Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Newbie here just got my 1025R about a month ago and I'm loving it but it is my first tractor so still learning a lot. I've read a lot a great posts and garnered some great information from the forums but I haven't been able to find anyone with my exact issue.

I have 5 acres of land that were once used as a hay field, as a result the yard I now mow has a lot of ruts and makes for a very bumpy ride. I'm wondering if anyone has leveled a yard that is grass? I've seen quite a few posts on road leveling but not sure if it will work the same trying to level sod. I'm looking at back blades, box blades, land planers but still not sure if any of them would work to cut through the sod and level it out or if that is even worth trying. Just wondering if anyone has experience on such a project as my bumpy yard is negatively affecting my beer's carbonation:drinks:

Thanks again for all the great info I've read through so far.
 

·
GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
I can't help with your question, but wanted to say:

:gtfam:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
Till the high spots and go over it with a land plane or box blade to fill in the low spots. It might be easiest to get a farmer to disc it up and replant the whole field. :unknown: If you don't want to work the whole thing up filling in the low spots with top soil may work.
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
37,776 Posts
First and foremost, welcome to GTT GTHOE.
With ejb69's post in mind, is the plan to level ALL 5 acres?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
Welcome to GTT!

I've done some spot touch ups on my yard,using a box blade. I dont know if I would want to do the whole yard like this tho. Here's what I did:
I dumped top soil in the area then using my box blade with the front cutting blade tilted back (top link extended). I pulled the new soil along with the BB just riding along the existing surface. With the BB tilted back, the blade wasnt actually cutting into the existing soil...or grass.But it filled the low spots and sort of knocked off the high's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Some areas it may be best to bring in some dirt to fill the ruts or low areas. Some areas you may be able to use a box blade to knock off the high spots. Depending on how big the high spots are and on the type of dirt you are working you may have some problems due to the smaller size of your tractor and the lack of hydraulic down pressure on the 3 point. There are always ways to work around this.

If you're in hard dirt such as clay the lack of hydraulic down pressure on the 3 point will be an issue for larger bumps. If you have some bumps that are a bit big you can make multiple passes with the box blade or scoop them with your bucket. I found sometimes it's easier to use a tiller on these larger hills and then move the dirt with a box blade or your bucket. If you don't have a box blade I would get one. It will definitely be your main tool for leveling.
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
37,776 Posts
A nice big heavy roller may work after a good rain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Or run the tiller around and then roll it. I've done that and it worked well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,626 Posts
I've used a tiller on bad spots in my yard. Also used the loader to fill in some low spots. In the spring when the grass is flat from snowpack I know my yard is pretty easy to see where trouble spots are.

-636
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,067 Posts
There's no 'one' solution to the problem. Working on my yard has been a mixture of cutting off high spots with the loader and a box blade, filling other spots and it could use a good flattening with a big roller.

A roller will do the least grass damage, which may make things tolerable. Beyond that, you will need scarifer teeth on a box blade or land plane to cut through the existing turf and level it, then reseed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
937 Posts
I believe that the best plan of attack would be to get a power rake with gauge wheels on the back. That pretty much is what it's made to do. The only problem with that is the price tag...

I till 2-3 yards on average a week and sometimes people will try to get me to do some extra work and get me to level their yard after I have tilled it. I will say that the type of grass does play a factor in the ease of leveling but any grass will make using a box blade after tilling a complete nightmare. We mostly have Bermuda grass out here and it will clump up like crazy after it is tilled (if you try to smooth it off with a blade of any kind, the tiller does level it off pretty well and there is no clumping caused by the tiller itself). This will cause the BB to dig ruts, not deposit the soil as it should, and can prevent it from digging in. My experience of leveling yards with a BB involves dumping fill dirt on top of a yard that has not been tilled and then using the BB tilted back to smooth it off. It will glide over the grass and do as you want it too. If you wish to till the yard it can be done afterwards.

These were just my experiences and thoughts on the matter. Good luck with getting it smoothed out.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks everyone

Great advise there. I believe the tiller would be the best option and it is the next implement I wanted to buy anyhow. It can't make it any worse than it is at any rate. Again thanks for the input.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,626 Posts
If you end up tilling it I would also try and find a harrow on Craigslist. They work great and smoothing out the ground and giving it a nice finish. When I till up sections of my yard I then hit them with the harrow a few times to make sure everything it nice and flat. Then I throw some grass seed out and run over everything to mix in the seed real nice. Once that's done I run my yard roller over everything to make sure the grass seed is nice and cozy. It has been a great system for me.

Here's a shot of a section that has been smoothed and then rolled. I use my 318 along with the 1026R because unhooking the tiller to pull the harrow and roller would be a P.I.T.A.



There were two crappy retaining walls where the second picture shows.


-636
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Pasture smoothing

I did my front pasture (10 acres) last summer from a forest of old stumps. After all the stumps were gone I used a double bottom plow going two directions (cross cutting) to get the soil, roots, etc cut up. After that I used a set of discs in two different directions (a tiller would have been nice) but things were well tilled. I had to spend the better part of each afternoon of plowing/discing picking up roots and whatever but I had a nice clean pasture. What I did last was hook pallets on the back of my 4 wheelers and the wife and I drove two 4 wheelers for a couple hours. If you align the slats on the pallets perpindicular to your direction of travel it will act like a cheese grater. Dirt gets up in the pallets and some is carried over and shakes out over low spots. You can hook at least two pallets one right after the other and drag a long cheese grater (the only way I know how to describe it) over your land. In the end it will be as smooth as any lawn. In fact I learned this method doing my lawn several years ago. After you seed you can run one pallet over all the newly seeded ground or a piece of chain link fence to get your seed set in. It's cheap and it works so well. Believe me I'm all about cheap. Haa haa A poor boy land plane for tilled soil.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top