Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I was wondering how you stabilize the tractor on a trailer?
Which way is the best way?

Straps around the wheels?
Straps attached to the frame?
Chains?

I'll have to move my 1025r from the house to the cottage at least a 1000000 times during the summer.

I purchased a flatbed trailer for that task, but I was wondering how you guys do that?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
I chain to the frame. I prefer to have chains come down at a 45 degree angle, use ratchet type load binders. I cant recall what size chain. Pull forward and back, left to right and vice versa. Prefer, but dont always do. Also, I am told US DOT requires a strap over the FEL arms or bucket. Check the laws in Canada.

Edit: make sure it is always tongue heavy, as in, enough weight towards front of trailer. If it gets too light, it can be very difficult or impossible to steer at higher speeds. Dont ask how I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
I chain to the frame. I prefer to have chains come down at a 45 degree angle, use ratchet type load binders. I cant recall what size chain. Pull forward and back, left to right and vice versa. Prefer, but dont always do. Also, I am told US DOT requires a strap over the FEL arms or bucket. Check the laws in Canada.

Edit: make sure it is always tongue heavy, as in, enough weight towards front of trailer. If it gets too light, it can be very difficult or impossible to steer at higher speeds. Dont ask how I know.
I've been pulling trailers for 35+ yrs. With that being said....you'd think I would have it down by now. I first learned about the tail wagging the dog when I was about 20 yrs old.(small trailer with long lumber hanging way out the back) I have always made sure that I didn't encounter that again. Well...it happened to me about a month ago ,again. But this time I had my tractor and some implements on the trailer. (2520 with backhoe and loaded tires) When leaving the deer lease I thought something didn't feel quite right...but I was tired and lazy. It drove Ok on the farm roads . But when I got it onto a faster road above 60 was when all he'' broke loose. I almost took out another car in the other lane as that 18' trailer was wagging my 9000lb van all over the road. Scared the crap out of me. I still don't know how I got it back under control...but I will never be lazy again and if it don't feel right, Ima be a stopping and repositioning fool.
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
37,816 Posts
rgd, That happened to me about 25 years ago and I was lucky nothing was coming from the other direction. I was just about to ditch the whole thing, reached down and hit the brake controller override slide switch. Boy was I lucky that day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
Been talked about lots, but a topic worth discussing.

I chain to the tractor frame, one in each corner, tightened with binders.

Others will argue straps are as good, or better. I say it's OK to be wrong in this world.....

Tee-hee!!!!

-J.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,899 Posts
Years ago I was taking my JD425 to the dealer for some repairs, using a Cheap set of nylon traps way under the weight of the 425. One of the traps broke ,going over a overpass I thought I noticed the tractor moving. Didn't stop only another mile or so , when I stopped , the front wheel was all on the very edge of trailer frame.
Another time I had put a load of 16' and longer saw lumber on a 14' trailer. Got up to speed and truck and load went every direction except straight above a certain speed. A 20 mile trip took a long long long time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eyeboltman

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
I use straps in four directions but never feel comfortable with them, they tend to loosen up on me sometimes. I don't haul very often but that is no excuse. I would prefer chains, I'm waiting for a sale on ratchet binders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
OK, I went to Norfolk to get 2 trailers, a flatbed which had bad tires when I arrived, and a weapons trailer. Considering condition, I had to put the weapons trailer on the bottom. (weapons trailers have the axles too far forward) I was fine up to 55 MPH, but at 56 the duals on the tractor walked around. I was in the hammer lane of I-95 when it got sideways. I was whippin that corn binder steering wheel L-R for all it was worth, one then the other. It all was surreal, kinda expected the end ya know? But it held it straight til my speed dropped under 55. I grabbed another gear and come on back to base. One trucker gave me the nod when he passed me. After that,, slow ride!

We used straps all the time, no problem as long as they didnt get cut. We used old pieces of firehose to pad against sharp steel. But Navy did ban the non ratchet type binders as a safety issue. I didnt mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,104 Posts
I use 10,000 lb straps on the rear of my 1025R and 5,000 lbs straps on the front, but will likely also change them over to 10,000 lbs straps. My understanding is that when using straps, you must "close" the ratchet handle when done to place them in the "lock" position so they maintain their tightness. The opposite is true when you open the ratchet fully to release the pressure. Secondly, you must make sure you have enough turns on the strap in the ratchet for the strap to "stick" in place, other wise it may pull out of the ratchet. Using straps is just like anything else, you have to know what you are doing and exercise caution at all times.

Next time you are driving down the interstate, take notice of the tie down methods used on many of the big loads being transported and you will see straps being used. However, I believe you will see chains/binders being used on heavy equipment.

By the way, I also run a strap over any attachments.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,079 Posts
Personally, I'm a big believer in chains and binders, on all 4 corners of the equipment.
I suppose exceptions can be made for short distance low speed hauling, if you can find 4 willing politicians to chain-bind to the front and rear of all 4 tires. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,056 Posts
I think the one first basic rule for someone who hasn't done this before is to be sure to be pulling in 2 opposite directions with your tie downs - not sideways. The rule here in Penna is 2 tie downs for equipment under 10k# and 4 for over 10k# plus one tie down for each attachment or implement.

For my zero turn mower, I used these Fastraps which I just loved:

Jungle Jim's Accessory Products | Transport Lockdowns | FaStrap

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
I use straps in four directions but never feel comfortable with them, they tend to loosen up on me sometimes. I don't haul very often but that is no excuse. I would prefer chains, I'm waiting for a sale on ratchet binders.
I grabbed mine at a Napa/Traction store in Hinton. I bet you won't have a problem finding one in oil country....

-J.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
I grabbed mine at a Napa/Traction store in Hinton. I bet you won't have a problem finding one in oil country....

-J.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Princess Auto puts them on sale a couple times per year as well as cargo chains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
770 Posts
Load the hitch so the weight is 60/40 and the tail wont wag the dog.

It's a trial and error thing to figure out the exact spot, but a strip of duct tape on the deck for a reference is quick and easy.

As far as frame or not, I dunno.

I have always run the front chain or strap through the weight bracket frame, and the back strap through the draw bar frame, and a strap over the loader, or through whatever impliment was on the back. Tension should be opposed, to control for and aft wiggling that will allow hooks to pop out of the trailer frame, Tractor in lowest gear, fuel shut off, brake on, and a wheel chock or two isn't a bad idea for longer trips and bumpy back roads with lighter tractors.

The Better 10K straps are fine, and in many ways better than chains these days.
Chains wear and get weak too. You just don't see the wear and weakened welds until they break. Straps are obvious when they get trashed.
Chains and Ratchet binders are a LOT quicker than fussing with straps though, and they aren't as much of a PITA in the wet and mud.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
For those in the U.S.A. :usa you might find this handy from the Dept of Transportation.

Which types of commercial motor vehicles are subject to the cargo securement standards of this subpart, and what general requirements apply?
Regulations Section | Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

What are the minimum performance criteria for cargo securement devices and systems?
Regulations Section | Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

What are the general requirements for securing articles of cargo?
Regulations Section | Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,826 Posts
I've been pulling trailers for 35+ yrs. With that being said....you'd think I would have it down by now. I first learned about the tail wagging the dog when I was about 20 yrs old.(small trailer with long lumber hanging way out the back) I have always made sure that I didn't encounter that again. Well...it happened to me about a month ago ,again. But this time I had my tractor and some implements on the trailer. (2520 with backhoe and loaded tires) When leaving the deer lease I thought something didn't feel quite right...but I was tired and lazy. It drove Ok on the farm roads . But when I got it onto a faster road above 60 was when all he'' broke loose. I almost took out another car in the other lane as that 18' trailer was wagging my 9000lb van all over the road. Scared the crap out of me. I still don't know how I got it back under control...but I will never be lazy again and if it don't feel right, Ima be a stopping and repositioning fool.
I am betting trailer brakes only or you slowed enough to regain control.

rgd, That happened to me about 25 years ago and I was lucky nothing was coming from the other direction. I was just about to ditch the whole thing, reached down and hit the brake controller override slide switch. Boy was I lucky that day.
I am sure good trailer brakes and proper use of the brake controller has saved many peoples bacon.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gizmo2

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Something I been experimenting with lately, I use a 4-5" diameter "face" type fence post as a chock. Lay it across the deck up, against the steel uprights. Makes for a very strong chock, but I need to bolt it down or something.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top