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First post here. I've read and searched forever on this problem and I can't figure it out. I've watched every video I can find and nothing seems to address what I've got going on.

I've had my 1025r for 3 1/2 years (180 hours). I was doing my spring service and replaced the fuel filter in the sediment bowl. It was running perfectly before and now it won't start. I had filled the bowl before putting it back on. Ran for a few seconds and died.

From other posts, my fuel pump does not click or make noise. Never has. My system doesn't seem to self prime. I called my local dealer where I bought it. Their suggestion was to just keep cranking and they confimed I'd not hear the fuel pump clicking.

I cracked open the steel lines at the injectors and can see small bubbles coming out. But I've been trying for hours and hours. I've had to charge my battery several times (cranked till battery was dead 3 or 4 times just today)

Other things that have been suggested that I've tried or checked:
Fuel is on.
Filter seems correct and not leaking.
Tank is 3/4 full.
I've tried starting fluid and it won't take off.
When its cranking and not using and starting fluid, it does nothing but crank. Doesn't even try and fire.

I'm so frustrated at this. Something that is this routine and common should not be this difficult. Does anyone have any suggestions or ideas. I'm at a loss and about ready to trailer back to the dealer.
 

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Sounds like your fuel transfer pump is not working. If you are turning the key to the on position and are not hearing a clicking noise you are nut pumping fuel to the high pressure pump. These engines self prime with the fuel transfer pump. Make sure your fuel shut off valve is opened. You might also try and fill the fuel tank to the top of the tank. This might give you some gravity feed to the fuel system.

Do you see fuel in the fuel filter water separator? You shouldn't need to crank it over for more than a minute or so. Do not use ether on these engines with glow plugs. Bottom line is, you are not getting fuel to the engine.
 

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Not getting fuel makes sense and I've considered that. But here's my question. If my transfer fuel pump has died, would the tractor run normally without it? It was running fine until I changed the filter and can't believe that it just died at the exact same time as changing the filter.

Could it be weak? Is that pump going out common at 180 hours?

Thanx for the help
 

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I cracked open the steel lines at the injectors and can see small bubbles coming out.
be very careful cracking the steel line if its a high pressure common rail system the pressure could cause serious injury i don't have much experience with yanmar engines but have experience with Cummins and it sounds like the transfer pump went out as these systems are self priming i believe these systems work very similar except for the electronics and pressures but i attached the documents to explain how the Cummins system works since i think they are similar i also found a link on how to bleed a john deere engine http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjYpNLc0rvaAhXxs1kKHRnBBRQQFggvMAI&url=http://manuals.deere.com/omview/OMCD16564_19/CD03523,000039A_19_20130604.html&usg=AOvVaw3C3CT7Cmcek2H5ZgUqZQ9e
 

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So, how's the in-line filter under the L. floorboard? Might have picked up enough gunk from the tank to plug when the repriming business was going on. This filter should be changed way more often than most do it...
 

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So, how's the in-line filter under the L. floorboard? Might have picked up enough gunk from the tank to plug when the repriming business was going on. This filter should be changed way more often than most do it...
What HH said. There is another filter under tank in case you didn't know. Didn't see you mention it in your post.
 

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To answer your question, no the engine won't run if the pump died. That's why it's there. It's a noisy little thing and you should hear it clicking when the key is on but the engine off. You mentioned that your pump has never made noise/clicking. You should be able to feel it then if it's working, at least some.

When I changed my filter at the engine, I forgot to turn the fuel shutoff back on. When I turned the key on to prime the bowl, the pump didn't work. When I turned the shutoff back on the pump worked and primed the bowl. I didn't look hard, but there must be an electrical connection somewhere that disconnects the electrical circuit to the pump when the shutoff is closed. I looked at the parts catalog for my year tractor and found a electrical connector on the wiring harness called fuel shutoff solenoid connector (if I recall correctly). That makes sense in my case.

So...
Make sure your shutoff is completely on. Might try closing and opening a couple times. Try the ignition (key on, engine off) see if the pump "clicks". If not, disconnect the electrical connector from the pump and use a volt meter set to DC, to see if you are getting 12 volts when you turn the key on to run position. That'll tell you if it's the pump or if it's even getting power.

If you're satisfied the pump is working, change the under floorboard filter. It's most likely not letting enough fuel through to get to the pump. They are only about $5.

Let us know.

P.S. As Case said, DO NOT use starting fluid. You're asking for more trouble.
 

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Been almost there

We ran the fuel out of an IH 784 and absolutely drove ourselves nuts with similar issues. In our case, it turned out that debris had plugged the line coming out of the tank.

I doubt you have that issue but I would start at the tank and crack couplings to see if you have fuel flow. If you do, then move to the next spot coupling in the line. The post about the fuel shut off solenoid sounds likely but if you trace it systematically, you will know for sure where the issue is.

Cracking low pressure or no pressure lines is just messy. Cracking high pressure lines can be dangerous. Lay a cloth over the line to slow down the high pressure fuel. If you want to watch, make sure you have eye protection and protection for exposed skin. Diesel injected under the skin isn't good for your complexion or health.

Treefarmer
 

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We ran the fuel out of an IH 784 and absolutely drove ourselves nuts with similar issues. In our case, it turned out that debris had plugged the line coming out of the tank.

I doubt you have that issue but I would start at the tank and crack couplings to see if you have fuel flow. If you do, then move to the next spot coupling in the line. The post about the fuel shut off solenoid sounds likely but if you trace it systematically, you will know for sure where the issue is.

Cracking low pressure or no pressure lines is just messy. Cracking high pressure lines can be dangerous. Lay a cloth over the line to slow down the high pressure fuel. If you want to watch, make sure you have eye protection and protection for exposed skin. Diesel injected under the skin isn't good for your complexion or health.

Treefarmer
Hmmm, that must be common with the 784's. We had a similar issue and found a small fir branch inside the fuel line. There was also debris stuck in the elbow for the fuel filter housing. Once cleared out and put back together it still wouldn't start because it's gravity feed to the pump. I ended up putting a little air pressure in the tank, then cracked the lines open until fuel came out. I kept doing that until I had fuel at the pump and it started right up.
 

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You might also try and fill the fuel tank to the top of the tank. This might give you some gravity feed to the fuel system
This is what I was going to suggest trying. It worked for me one time. I changed the fuel filter and sediment bowl on a 1025r and it would start, but stall out or start and run super rough without smoothing out. I turned off and filled the tank full. Turned it back on and ran rough for a couple seconds and then smoothed right out. Worth trying at least.
 

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Your tractor *may* be able to run without the assistance of the transfer pump. The injection pump could have an internal pump or it was running ok because it never lost its prime. Once air was introduced during the filter change, the pump could air lock without some pressure being added by the transfer pump. It is possible.

Take the low pressure line off and clip it into a container. Turn on the ignition and observe the flow. No or low flow? Fix that first and I believe your tractor will jump back to life pretty easily.
 

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Your tractor *may* be able to run without the assistance of the transfer pump. The injection pump could have an internal pump or it was running ok because it never lost its prime. Once air was introduced during the filter change, the pump could air lock without some pressure being added by the transfer pump. It is possible.

Take the low pressure line off and clip it into a container. Turn on the ignition and observe the flow. No or low flow? Fix that first and I believe your tractor will jump back to life pretty easily.
This
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the replies.

I have tried putting a little air pressure in the tank to help push the fuel and no luck.

I just can't understand how that pump died at the exact same time as I was changing the filter. That makes no sense at all. I cannot hear a continued clicking (key on, engine off) and I've tried feeling it but can't tell if it's doing anything.

As for the under floor filter, I've not checked it but there was almost nothing in my sediment bowl. I know that doesn't mean it couldn't be clogged and I'll certainly check it. I'm normally very careful when I fuel up.

When I'm cracking the lines at the injectors, I see some small bubbles come out and a dribble of fuel. Bubbles don't come out every time I open them.

Is there a way to test the fuel solenoid?
 

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There is absolutely no need to open the high pressure lines. You have a self bleeding system. But you have to have positive fuel flow to the injector pump. Please test the low pressure side first and report to us if you get good flow with a low pressure hose removed and into a container. Turn the ignition on and observe the flow. Let us know what you get. If no or low flow, then your pump is bad (electrically or mechanically) or you have a blockage somewhere. Visual inspections won't find and correct this problem.
 

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There is absolutely no need to open the high pressure lines. You have a self bleeding system. But you have to have positive fuel flow to the injector pump. Please test the low pressure side first and report to us if you get good flow with a low pressure hose removed and into a container. Turn the ignition on and observe the flow. Let us know what you get. If no or low flow, then your pump is bad (electrically or mechanically) or you have a blockage somewhere. Visual inspections won't find and correct this problem.
Are the 1 series relays and pumps that quiet? I can hear a very audible click and the hum of the pump very clearly while my glow plugs are cycling. I'm in the habit of listening for the sequence so I know if something has changed or isn't right.
 

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Before you start tearing into stuff - keep it simple - change out that little 89¢ fuel filter. It doesn't matter how careful you are when fueling - that filter is very small and will clog easily over time.
This is what I would have done first as well...and did you say you checked all your fuses?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I pulled the line from the outflow side of the sediment bowl. There was almost no flow out while cranking engine. I guess that's what I should have called a clue.

If it can run without it but primed, that could make sense. Now that its lost its prime, it can't get fuel to reprime.

I know others have mentioned this being a self priming engine. I can only hope that's true if I replace the transfer pump.

As to fuses, those all look okay.
 

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Are the 1 series relays and pumps that quiet? I can hear a very audible click and the hum of the pump very clearly while my glow plugs are cycling. I'm in the habit of listening for the sequence so I know if something has changed or isn't right.
While sound is a nice normal indication that everything is working, I wouldn't trust it during troubleshooting. When I owned a 1 series, the fuel pump made a clicking sound, not normal noise from a fuel pump. They could've easily changed suppliers and designs making them even quieter or virtually silent. Relays can also be very quiet. Solenoids are by nature fairly loud.

Again, this is all great info, but that doesn't mean the pump is actually pumping fuel. If it normally makes noise, then making noise is a good indicator, but not proof its moving fuel. If you hear it making noise though, you can rule out the electrical side of the transfer pump as being the issue. :good2:
 

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As to fuses, those all look okay.
Fuses can look ok and still be bad. Do you have a meter? You can put one lead on the negative side of the battery or any good ground source on the frame. Put your other lead on the tiny metal exposed ends on the fuse. You should see battery voltage on BOTH contacts. You can also remove the fuse and either check for continuity or resistance. Low resistance is good, infinity or open circuit is bad.
 
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