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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey,all

Someday, I'm probably gonna need to get another tractor. One of the many things i will use it for is snow removal. Down in southern Indiana, we only get around 9.5" at most plus drifting. I love the idea of a blower, being able to throw snow far away, but I've heard that snowblowers need to be "Fed", and I'm not sure if I get enough snow for a blower. Oh, and I like the blower because of all of the moving parts and added complexity :lol:

So what do you all think?

Thanks!!!
 

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What tractor do you have? We have a similar situation here. Mostly get a few inches that can be plowed but every now and then we get dumped on which can only be properly handled with a blower. I used to have an old Ford 9N with a back blade for plowing and a 13HP 33" walk-behind for the big stuff. My knees aren't what they used to be so a couple years ago I sold everything and got a 2720 with a 54" front blower and a 5' rear blade. It is the perfect combo. I plow when plowing is appropriate and blow snow when needed. Sometimes I even plow snow onto a big pile and then blow it out of the way.

It's the best of both worlds.
 
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Hey,all
Oh, and I like the blower because of all of the moving parts and added complexity :lol:

So what do you all think?

!
What do I think...? Uhhhh.... I think yer nutz!:laugh::crazy::laugh:

Blowers do need to be fed, especially the older single stage type. 2 stages are more forgiving and when you get used to doing 1"-3" snow falls the blower is just as good as a plow. The secret to small snows is to blow the first row right down close on top of where the next pass is going to be. Keep doing that each pass until you have the depth of snow accumulated that your blower "likes". The right travelling speed is essential in lighter snows (big snows as well, not too fast to bog the engine). One can blow any depth of snow. The same can't be said for plowing, it gets much harder the deeper it gets and then there is the "stacking" thing...

All that aside, I enjoy plowing more. No "Snowman Effects" collecting on your clothes when the wind is fickle and less noise. I have my standby GX335/42" single stage if things get out of hand for the plow so I'm fixed OK.

BTW, if you are going 54" JD blade be sure to check out (Pay Now button:laugh) Artillion's rubber cutting edge and blade wings. It is the plow "icing on the cake" for efficiency especially on pavement.
 

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I have both front mounted. I start by plowing early. After a few weeks and some decent snows I have an ice road built then I switch to the blower. (gravel drives) I am often out of room to push the snow by then as well. If I had to choose one it would be the blower, one pass and done. That said when I looked on CL for a used blower I searched INd, they just don't get used enough down there. I bought a like new 47 out of indy for 700 bucks. It had sat for a couple years, lack of snow. I once lived near Jasper in and all I needed there was a back blade. Here we get 100 plus a year and I plow a 850 and 1000 plus ft drive. I moved snow over 100 hours last year. Not near that this but still glad I have the big guns. I have a heated cab as well so I can run down the road from place to place.
 

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For southern Indiana, I'd highly recommend a blade mounted on a front end loader. Depending on the areas you have to clear would determine if you need a blade that angles. I have short distances to push so a non angling blade works great. I've piled snow eight feet high many times in the last 20 years that I've pushed snow with my antique tractor, loader, and blade. If I had a long drive to clear I'd have an angling blade on a loader. Maybe even a hyd angle.

I used a mounted snow blower on a garden tractor for several years when I lived in town, but getting covered with snow gets real old. Everybody says to blow with the wind but around buildings and trees, wind direction changes constantly. Upkeep of the blower is much more costly than a blade too. PTO clutches for the garden tractor lasted 4-5 years instead of 10-15 just mowing. Even front wheel bearings wore out from being soaked in ice/water in 3-5 years versus 15-20 years of normal use.

I've pushed four foot tall drifts with my 35 HP 7000# 2wd tractor with chains. SON and I had a snow moving event several years ago when we had over 100 inches of snow and moved several hundred cubic yards of snow out of the front yard of our house in just a couple hours. I had my tractor, SON had his, 50 HP 2wd 7500# tractor with loader, chains, and 80 inch wide bucket that I had moved snow with as a 10 year old 45 years before.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What tractor do you have? We have a similar situation here. Mostly get a few inches that can be plowed but every now and then we get dumped on which can only be properly handled with a blower. I used to have an old Ford 9N with a back blade for plowing and a 13HP 33" walk-behind for the big stuff. My knees aren't what they used to be so a couple years ago I sold everything and got a 2720 with a 54" front blower and a 5' rear blade. It is the perfect combo. I plow when plowing is appropriate and blow snow when needed. Sometimes I even plow snow onto a big pile and then blow it out of the way.

It's the best of both worlds.

I'm probably gonna need another tractor. I currently only have the 4510, but I've got my eye on a 2032R.

Jh123
 

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Discussion Starter #7
For southern Indiana, I'd highly recommend a blade mounted on a front end loader. Depending on the areas you have to clear would determine if you need a blade that angles. I have short distances to push so a non angling blade works great. I've piled snow eight feet high many times in the last 20 years that I've pushed snow with my antique tractor, loader, and blade. If I had a long drive to clear I'd have an angling blade on a loader. Maybe even a hyd angle.

I used a mounted snow blower on a garden tractor for several years when I lived in town, but getting covered with snow gets real old. Everybody says to blow with the wind but around buildings and trees, wind direction changes constantly. Upkeep of the blower is much more costly than a blade too. PTO clutches for the garden tractor lasted 4-5 years instead of 10-15 just mowing. Even front wheel bearings wore out from being soaked in ice/water in 3-5 years versus 15-20 years of normal use.

I've pushed four foot tall drifts with my 35 HP 7000# 2wd tractor with chains. SON and I had a snow moving event several years ago when we had over 100 inches of snow and moved several hundred cubic yards of snow out of the front yard of our house in just a couple hours. I had my tractor, SON had his, 50 HP 2wd 7500# tractor with loader, chains, and 80 inch wide bucket that I had moved snow with as a 10 year old 45 years before.
I looked at that. But it's very expensive and my tractor isn't properly equipped.
 

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Here in Washington, Illinois, the best choice for me is the FEL with a 5' blade on the back of my 4100. I can clear my shop drive on the way up to the house drive, clear the house drive with the turnaround / parking area all in about 20 minutes each time I do it. It'd be quicker if I had a hydraulic cylinder on the blade to change the angle. Hmm, I feel another project coming on.
 
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After having lived all over Michigan and having owned several types of each, here's my list of pro/cons:

Blade - pro:
Good for light to moderate snowfall
Mechanically simple
Lightweight (easy to hook up)
Higher working speeds
Easy to use around buildings
Good for scraping packed snow
Inexpensive
Depending on the type of blade they can be used for grading/landscaping in summer

Blade - con:
The need to push snow piles back into 'holding areas'
Not good for clearing extreme amounts of snow
Can increase wear on a vehicle's chassis when used incorrectly
Can be hard to use to clear large areas (barnyards)

Blower - pro:
Best choice for clearing large amounts of snowfall
Fairly simple if pto driven
The ability to pile snow far from where it fell
Great for use on large areas
Great for areas that drift in

Blower - con:
Poor choice for less than 2" of snowfall
Slow working speeds
Not as simple if hydraulically driven
Heavy
Shear-pins... :banghead:
Extremely expensive (compared to a blade)
Unless you have a cab they are not fun to use around buildings or in shifting winds
Takes lots of HP to run... Ok, maybe this is one is not always a bad thing!


Match your equipment to the conditions and you'll have no problem.
 

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I would choose a blade over a blower for my uses.. There are times a blower would be nice, but the cost of them and to only use on snow, I cant justify one.. You can use a blade year round if you have a use..


Here in Washington, Illinois, the best choice for me is the FEL with a 5' blade on the back of my 4100. I can clear my shop drive on the way up to the house drive, clear the house drive with the turnaround / parking area all in about 20 minutes each time I do it. It'd be quicker if I had a hydraulic cylinder on the blade to change the angle. Hmm, I feel another project coming on.
Hi neighbor!!! :bigbeer:
 

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As Per Evergreen's post
My simple answer would be to get BOTH. And a heated cab for extreme weather conditions would be nice
Of course only you know what you need / want
Wants and Needs :hide:
 

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Hey,all

Someday, I'm probably gonna need to get another tractor. One of the many things i will use it for is snow removal. Down in southern Indiana, we only get around 9.5" at most plus drifting. I love the idea of a blower, being able to throw snow far away, but I've heard that snowblowers need to be "Fed", and I'm not sure if I get enough snow for a blower. Oh, and I like the blower because of all of the moving parts and added complexity :lol:

So what do you all think?

Thanks!!!
I think there are more choices for snow management than there are for models of tractor.

Just like choosing a model of tractor, the right choice of snow tools depends on many variables. Annual snowfall, type of surface(s) being cleaned, hills, flats, long narrow roads or wide open spaces, budget, etc. Even just having a bad back or neck can affect the decision process.
 

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S5300022.JPG S5300024.JPG

We just had a similar discussion last week or so on here. This is always a popular question with differing opinions. I live in NW Wisconsin on the tip of mighty Lake Superior. We get plenty of snow here and we see it from late October - early May. We can get dumpings of 12" - 24" often in the winter. I have a hydraulic V-blade in the front and a 3 point blower on the rear. I hardly use my blower. It's a pain to drive backwards and it is very slow compared to a blade. If you don't have a cab be prepared to get snowed on when using your blower. I use my blower mostly for added weight on the rear tires and to blow my snow banks back once in a while. I have no problem moving snow with my blade regardless of how much we get. Before I got my hydraulic v-blade, I had a manual angle plow. I can move 24 inches of wet heavy snow in the angle, non v position. In the v position I have yet to hit enough snow where I can't move it.

In areas with little snow fall I could not imagine getting a snow blower. Snow blowers are costly, slow, and messy in regards to the operator getting hit with snow from the blower. The only way i would consider a snow blower in areas where you get little snow would be if you had a very small tractor. A snow blower would be a good option on a lawn tractor sized machine where you may lack power, weight, and traction to push snow over a decent distance.

I would get a blade 1st and foremost. It will do all of your snow needs effectively and in a fast, cost effective manner. Hold off on getting a blower unless you see a killer price that is way too cheap to pass up. The bucket on a loader will work too, but I personally do not like using a bucket. It makes a windrow on both sides when plowing and leaves a mess. In heavy snow you will run out of traction fast with a bucket because it pushes the snow ahead of the tractor and keeps it there rather than rolling off to the side as a blade does.
 

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I let my 47 snow blower & original cab go with my 2720 when I upgraded to a 4120 last spring.
I have not missed them one bit this winter. The 1026R & front blade work just fine & are a lot faster.
I have the 4120 & loader as backup to stack the snow higher if needed.
 

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In areas with little snow fall I could not imagine getting a snow blower. Snow blowers are costly, slow, and messy in regards to the operator getting hit with snow from the blower. The only way i would consider a snow blower in areas where you get little snow would be if you had a very small tractor. A snow blower would be a good option on a lawn tractor sized machine where you may lack power, weight, and traction to push snow over a decent distance.
I was initially trying to remain impartial with my pro/con list but this is 100% spot on. Indiana will probably never get enough snow for you to need a blower... and if it does, it is a lot cheaper to know a buddy who has one!

I live in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and a blade on the front of my Model M has handled the last two winters with ease. 10" overnight is neither uncommon nor is it a big deal for the little machine, provided it has a few hours on the block heater to wake up first. Plowing every flake of snow off of a 250' of driveway and a 60'x60' parking area takes an hour. I spent less on that tractor and a blade than most people spend on just a blower.
 

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Get both -- not that much more

I decided to get both and have been happy with the decision. On my 1025R, they share the front quick hitch. So if you can afford the blower and quick hitch, adding the blade just isn't that much more money. The blade is useful for landscaping work, so I didn't want to be without one. With drifting and wet snows in the foothills of Northern Colorado, the blower is a necessity at times. And there are times with light snows that I just use the blade.
 

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Here in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts I started out using my 54" front blade until my driveway "shrank" due to thermal contraction. I finally had to switch to my 47" snowblower to get the snow over the snow banks as the front blade cannot do. The only problem with the snowblower is the snow at the edge of the driveway that the state plows push in is wet and sloppy and the discharge chute can get clogged if I drive too fast. I have to watch my discharge chute and take it very slow.

Bob
 
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