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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have experience with Bluegrass Utility Trailers? A local guy sells them, but I can't find many reviews or comments about them online. They look solid. This one is 16' long, 76" wide with tandem axles (3500lb axles) and a brake on one axle. I know the market is flooded with many different types of these trailers, but these seem better than most. I just haven't heard of them before.
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I have not seen that brand, doesn't make it good or bad. I have PJ trailer witch I think is well made if you have a dealer take a look and compare.

Doug

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Brakes and load limit would be my concern, appears to be a very little to 'light duty' trailer.
 
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X2 on what coaltrain said

Doug

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Offering brakes standard on only one axle in a tandem setup tells me they are building to price point, NOT to quality. I'd be gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is amazing how many trailer manufacturers offer brakes on only one axle. Most have the option for adding a brake to the second axle though.
 

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Lots of strong opinions against brakes only one axle. I would like to hear some details on why this is so bad.
Is there not enough braking power to stop the trailer?
 

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Single brake axles are fine with the right tow vehicle and the proper load. As Meburdick said, they're built that way to hit a certain price point. The trailer business has a lot of small, regional builders and margins are thin.

I prefer brakes on all axles just because it has more stopping power and wears the components less. There are more components to wear though, so it's not as much a cost savings on maintenance as it is extending the intervals that shoes need to be replaced. It's also easier on the tow vehicle. I wouldn't write off an entire brand just because they build a trailer with one axle brakes. That would be like writing off all Fords trucks because you test drove a Ranger but want an F-450. Talk to them, inspect the trailers in person and see what else they offer. Personally I'm not a fan of trailers with side rails and gates for tractors and equipment, I prefer a flat deck car/ equipment trailer style, most of which have brakes on both axles.
 

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Lots of strong opinions against brakes only one axle. I would like to hear some details on why this is so bad.
Is there not enough braking power to stop the trailer?
2 reasons on my part:

1. More is always better than less when it comes to stopping tons of weight from crushing me (and possibly killing other people!)

2. Some states require brakes on all wheels. I'd rather not have to worry about whether I'm legal or not every time I cross a State line. I live in MA and State law here doesn't require any brakes at all until you get to a trailer rated for 10,000 lbs. CT is only about 40 miles south of me and they require brakes on all wheels for any trailer over 3000 lbs. I could stick with MA laws and hope I never get caught in CT but why risk it?
 
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Lots of strong opinions against brakes only one axle. I would like to hear some details on why this is so bad.
Is there not enough braking power to stop the trailer?
2 reasons on my part:

1. More is always better than less when it comes to stopping tons of weight from crushing me (and possibly killing other people!)

2. Some states require brakes on all wheels. I'd rather not have to worry about whether I'm legal or not every time I cross a State line. I live in MA and State law here doesn't require any brakes at all until you get to a trailer rated for 10,000 lbs. CT is only about 40 miles south of me and they require brakes on all wheels for any trailer over 3000 lbs. I could stick with MA laws and hope I never get caught in CT but why risk it?

As JimR stated in his second point, some states are already requiring it, likely fueled at least in part by my next point:

What's the point of having brakes on a trailer over a certain GTWR if they aren't going to be on all axles? Most states require brakes on trailers over 3000lbs GTWR because it makes towing that much weight significantly safer. If you have a tandem trailer with a pair of 3500 lb axles, you likely have a trailer capable of 7000 GTWR. Law requires brakes at 3000, why WOULDN'T you add another set of brakes to handle "the other 4000 lbs"?

Any trailer manufacturer that puts brakes on one axle of a tandem trailer is doing the bare minimum to meet state laws and regulations while keeping their prices artificially low. I don't have an interest in doing business with companies that do the bare minimum.
 
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