Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 4310 with a 420 FEL. I would like to get a 3 point blade for dirt work, spreading gravel, and possibly clearing snow. Right now I will only be getting 1 blade, so I am wondering which type would work best for me. I have never used a box blade, so I don't know how it would work with gravel.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,636 Posts
I recently purchased a 4310 with a 420 FEL. I would like to get a 3 point blade for dirt work, spreading gravel, and possibly clearing snow. Right now I will only be getting 1 blade, so I am wondering which type would work best for me. I have never used a box blade, so I don't know how it would work with gravel.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
well the plain back blade u want will be cheafer than a box blade for sure, unless u go with a hydraulic back blade:dunno: which then would probably be more money than a box blade:laugh:

didn't mean to mix u up:laugh: u will fine we like to kid a lot here, and have fun also at it. i have a 6 ft frontier back blade, and i have used it for all the reason's u have said, and it did a good job at it. i don't have a box blade, so i can't help u out-ok. but good luck

and welcome from south central PA. :wgtt:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,867 Posts
Either/both

I have both and find they somewhat interchangeable but each has it's points. For snow and putting a crown on a gravel road, the back blade works better for me. It's also better for cleaning out a ditch of debris or cutting a new ditch. A rear blade is probably more versatile but also a bit harder to learn. Each adjustment actually changes something else. Change the angle and the side to side level changes. Same with the top link, etc.

For spreading topsoil or filling in potholes, the box blade seems to work better. It's also better if you have to cut into hard ground or gravel as you can drop the scarifiers and break up the hard stuff. I bought both of mine used and probably didn't pay much more than the cost of one new. Somewhere on here is good advice on the box blade. Weight matters so get the heaviest built one that works for your tractor. Get a replaceable, curved cutting edge so it bites into the ground. Instead of lift pins look for the hitch that uses pins through the side plates so you can back up and simply move the lift arms straight up. That's also a stronger rig for when you hit a root or rock. I didn't get any of those things buying used but still am satisfied with what I have except for the cutting edge will be better when I replace it.

If I had to go with only one, it would be the rear blade but plenty of other people would choose the box blade.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Buy the box first since it is more money.
Then a month or two later you will say: "Hey the back blade is only $300 so I guess I will get one." :gizmo:

Seriously, I have both. I use the box blade for the rough work and initial grading. Then I will sometimes finish grade with the back blade. If I could ONLY buy one it would probably be the back blade.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,068 Posts
They both have advantages. A rear blade will work better for cutting ditches, crowning a road or moving snow because you can angle the blade to move material across it while you drive forward. However, you really can't drag a lot of material from point A to B because it will spill off the sides so a box blade would work better if you had long ruts to fill in. Another advantage of the box is the scarifier teeth. When repairing potholes, you don't want to just fill them in. You need to break up the hard packed area around the hole, otherwise it's like filling a bowl full of water. When someone drives over it, the dirt just splashes out of the pothole like if you slapped your hand down into a bowl of water. With a box blade, you can rip the pothole with the scarifiers and if you have a box full of material you can fill it in all on the same pass. With a rear blade you have to cut out the hole, which disturbs a larger section of the road base.

If you do a lot of grading, a hydraulic top and side link will be huge improvements. You can tilt the implement forward and back to adjust how aggressively it cuts, and tilt it side to side all from your seat. For cutting ditches or crowning a road the side tile is a big advantage. If the road you're driving on is uneven, when your tractor leans the blade will lean also which makes getting an even surface tricky. With the side link, when the tractor leans I can adjust the tilt of the blade to compensate so the road surface behind me is even. Most rear blades will tilt and angle on the implement, but with a box blade you have to tilt the three point hitch on the tractor in order to cut at an angle like a ditch. If you have hydraulic links (top and tilt) to do this, no big deal. If you're using the factory threaded links, tilting an implement sideways is a pain. A rear blade would be easier to work with if you don't have top and tilt links in my opinion, but I wouldn't let that be my only deciding factor.
 

·
Fit Rite Hydraulics
Joined
·
663 Posts
A rear blade is going to work by far better for snow. Everything else can be done with either unit, some things easier with one vs the other. Ideally you will end up with both types of implements. They each excel at certain tasks. My opinion would be to get a rear blade first and then a box blade.

Also, get the best heaviest units that you can afford. The perfect width box blade for your tractor is 66" in my opinion, but one between 5'-6' would be fine. For a rear blade, I would get a 7 footer, but 6' will work also.

Here are a couple of recommendations.

Rear blade

Roll over box blade. 65" unit would be great. A big advantage to a ROBB is that the rippers are engaged by pulling the lever from the tractor seat and that typically once the top link is set, it does not need any other adjustments that are often required with a std box blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
I just finished making a gravel strip for my implements to sit on. I had at my disposal my 2720 with 53" bucket, 6ft box blade, land plane and rear blade. I dug up the sod with the bucket and then graded it with the land plane. Next I started using the box blade to spread the gravel but actually found it more cumbersome than just spreading it with the bucket and back blading it. Then I went over it again with the land plane to smooth it out. Then I packed it with an old paving roller. Turned out awesome!

What type of dirt work are you wanting to do? Personally I find my land plane way more useful than the box blade. About the only time the rear blade comes out is for snow work.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BigJim55

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies, especially those explaining the advantages of each type.

I recently purchased a home on 5 acres, so there will be a variety of tasks to be done. I know I will need to put in some gravel drives leading to out buildings since right now there is nothing but grass/mud. Also, grading areas for new concrete, leveling uneven areas of the yard, etc. I also have a gravel parking lot at business I own which needs a new layer of gravel spread on it. I would say that the majority of what I would use a blade for would be spreading gravel and dirt. I don't see much need for cutting ditches, and I will do most of my snow removal with the plow on my truck.

Eventually, I'm sure I will get both types of blades, but right now I think I am leaning toward the box blade. The biggest advantage I can see is the scarifier teeth for breaking through the tough clay soil we have here.

Any other advice is appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,867 Posts
Thinking it through

Thanks for the replies, especially those explaining the advantages of each type.

I recently purchased a home on 5 acres, so there will be a variety of tasks to be done. I know I will need to put in some gravel drives leading to out buildings since right now there is nothing but grass/mud. Also, grading areas for new concrete, leveling uneven areas of the yard, etc. I also have a gravel parking lot at business I own which needs a new layer of gravel spread on it. I would say that the majority of what I would use a blade for would be spreading gravel and dirt. I don't see much need for cutting ditches, and I will do most of my snow removal with the plow on my truck.

Eventually, I'm sure I will get both types of blades, but right now I think I am leaning toward the box blade. The biggest advantage I can see is the scarifier teeth for breaking through the tough clay soil we have here.

Any other advice is appreciated.
I'd say you've done a good job of thinking through what you need, and what you already have.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,787 Posts
Thanks for the replies, especially those explaining the advantages of each type.

I recently purchased a home on 5 acres, so there will be a variety of tasks to be done. I know I will need to put in some gravel drives leading to out buildings since right now there is nothing but grass/mud. Also, grading areas for new concrete, leveling uneven areas of the yard, etc. I also have a gravel parking lot at business I own which needs a new layer of gravel spread on it. I would say that the majority of what I would use a blade for would be spreading gravel and dirt. I don't see much need for cutting ditches, and I will do most of my snow removal with the plow on my truck.

Eventually, I'm sure I will get both types of blades, but right now I think I am leaning toward the box blade. The biggest advantage I can see is the scarifier teeth for breaking through the tough clay soil we have here.

Any other advice is appreciated.
The box blade with the drop down scarifiers will be more valuable if you need to get down and break up heavier compacted soils.
The 3 point relies on weight of the implement for down force as there is no down pressure so having the teeth helps a ton.
I have the frontier box blade and it works great. You can cut crowns by adjusting side arms of three point.
I did my gravely clay based driveway by angling box down on right side and dropping the right side scarifier. It cut the gutter nicely and i just kept working material to center to build up the crown.

The blade is a great implement as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
Don't discount what you can do with the front bucket either. For stripping the sod for my parking pad I found it easier to use the bucket. Once I got under the sod with the bucket I just drove ahead till the bucket was full then scooped it and then took it somewhere to dump. My 2720 doesn't have enough power/traction to break through the prairie grass with a box blade.
Back dragging with the bucket can give some nice results once you've got some practice in and is especially useful in tight areas where you may not be able to get an implement in.

If you want to do your own gravel driveways and parking pads keep an eye out for Heavy Duty roller. I picked an old paving roller up at an auction last fall and its been great for for all sorts of things.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top