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I'm trying to decide what implement is best suited for a project at my hunting property. We've got 110 acres that are centered along a ridge. We have pasture and plots on both sides and ride 4-wheelers, side by sides and tractors all along the hillside. We stick to the edges of the fields, but they're all well up the hill, which makes it a full-body workout on a 4-wheeler, a three-person pileup on the bench seat of a side by side, and just a hairy ride on a tractor. This summer, I'd like to use my inbound 3033R to work the dirt where we ride into a more level and comfortable place to travel.

My first thought was a box scraper on a tractor equipped with TnT. If I have a large enough scraper (I'm planning on a 66" or 72"), I should able to angle the box in a manner to begin cutting into the hillside to level things out. Would a simple hydraulic rear blade be a better option for this? Or maybe some other implement that I haven't thought of?

In total, it's about 1,000yds of project and I know it will be many hours of work, but as my kids get old enough to ride out there, I want it to be safe for them.

I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Our property includes a large portion of the ridge that runs for NNE to SSW.



And just for fun to show you what's running around on the property...



 

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yep. box blade is a good tool for that.
 

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If you can only have one rear implement, it would have to be the box blade as you can use the scarifiers to dig with. If you can swing another implement, get the rear blade also as it offers some options not available with the box blade, such as using it at an angle to move dirt sideways. With the box blade, you can wind up with dirt all along the outer edge of the trail and an angled rear blade can move it quickly back onto the trail.

Dave
 
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To level and even out what you have, a box blade or land plane would be a good choice. The box blade can carry more material to fill in low spots, but the land plane will give you a smoother surface. If you could only have one, the box blade is more versatile. The box blade can angle up and down with a side link or front to back with a top link, but can't be angled to put one end further away from the tractor like you could a rear blade to move dirt across the blade.

For what you want to do, I would consider a rear blade. You can angle it to move dirt sideways, and if you get one with a blade that can be offset to one side you can use that to cut into your hill and widen the road without having to drive the tractor half on the road, half off and attempt to level it with the side link. With any rear grading implement, TnT is a great addition. :good2:
 

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It sounds like you may be needing to cut a level road into a hillside? If that is the case a rear blade will do better.
 

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FWIW - I tilt my boxblade to help grade my ditch by shortening/lengthening the sidelinks to tilt it. One of these days I'll put a full hydraulic 3-link kit on it to get maximum flexibility.

I think of my boxblade like a swiss army knife - it does all kinds of things.
 
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A box blade is a useful tool.
 

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Gee, to really have some input, I'd need to see this first hand....I'll bring my bow!:thumbup1gif:
 

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Both. . .

If I was limited to one implement it would be the best rear blade I could afford and make sure I could offset it. Ideally you could have both the box blade and rear blade. The box blade is useful for starting the initial cut with the scarifiers and move material from a high spot to a low spot. The rear blade will work much better to level out hillsides where you are running along the side of the hill as you can cut into the bank and move dirt to the low side in a continuous ribbon. A FEL will also come in for all sorts of uses if you have that. One word of caution is that if the grade is too steep for an ATV, you will need to be cautious on the tractor as well. One good thing is that both the box and rear blades can have some stabilizing effect. It's really not fun to be on a tractor that's sliding down a hill, at least not for me. I've only tried it a couple of times and didn't like it at all. Nothing bad happened either time except to my nerves. If you have really steep areas, you might consider renting a backhoe or track hoe for those and knock out the dangerous areas first.

No matter what you use, this will be a long term project with smaller equipment. That just means more seat time!

Treefarmer
 

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If it is in fact cutting into a hillside and 1000 yards+ I would entertain hiring a bulldozer to carve out the initial road. Then a box blade/rear blade will be great for maintaining it.

When working on a hillside you have to remember the need to provide proper drainage also which an initial run through with a dozer can easily provide.
 

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If it is in fact cutting into a hillside and 1000 yards+ I would entertain hiring a bulldozer to carve out the initial road. Then a box blade/rear blade will be great for maintaining it.

When working on a hillside you have to remember the need to provide proper drainage also which an initial run through with a dozer can easily provide.
This is what I was going to suggest also.
 
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box blade

The problem I have found in my years is a 3 point mounted box or scraper will dig when the front wheel raise or will raise when they drop in hole. The best for fine grading and to get things level isa pull type as the wheels behind the blade or box keep things level. Have included 2 pics for reference only. That is why I bought the pull type old raod grader that I did
 

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The problem I have found in my years is a 3 point mounted box or scraper will dig when the front wheel raise or will raise when they drop in hole. The best for fine grading and to get things level isa pull type as the wheels behind the blade or box keep things level. Have included 2 pics for reference only. That is why I bought the pull type old raod grader that I did
I don't use rears blades so I can't comment on them, but I do use a box blade regularly. You should always have the rockshaft fully lowered when using a boxblade. If you do so the front of the tractor will have no effect on what the boxblade is doing and neither will the rear tires. This means that you can get a smooth finish on the first try even if the tractor is going over bumps and holes.

The type you sent pics of are still supported by the wheels of the tractor (although their effect is mostly diminished) and the wheels of the implement itself. If moving dirt over ruts or potholes the newly deposited dirt can be squished by the wheels which will cause the blade to dip.


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Box blade

Unless you have your 3 pt in float any movement up and down on the front will effect the implement simple physics. The back wheels are the fulcrum what one side does the other will be opposite. Just like a teeter tooter one side goes up the other down, Years ago the Dearborn company made a 3 pt scraper that had a adjustable trailing wheel and that made a perfectly smooth surface. And if the box is in float it will not smooth out anything. That is why they offer trailing wheels on land scape rakes. Your right the tongue on a pull type does not move as much as the 3 pt.
 

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If it is in fact cutting into a hillside and 1000 yards+ I would entertain hiring a bulldozer to carve out the initial road. Then a box blade/rear blade will be great for maintaining it.

When working on a hillside you have to remember the need to provide proper drainage also which an initial run through with a dozer can easily provide.
I'm in this court.
Rent a small dozer or hire a local to blast out what you want.
Then a box blade or scraper blade would be a great maintaining tool.
...and those are some nice bucks. :good2:
 
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Your rear 3 point hitch is always in float mode Tony. Unless you have a down pressure kit, the 3 point is able to float up at any time. All your hitch control does is set the down limit. :good2:
 

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Hitch

Your rear 3 point hitch is always in float mode Tony. Unless you have a down pressure kit, the 3 point is able to float up at any time. All your hitch control does is set the down limit. :good2:
OK once again did not convey what I was thinking. As you noted it is always in float and if your depth control is set to the position it was when you started any movement down on the front will raise the box Right ??
 

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OK once again did not convey what I was thinking. As you noted it is always in float and if your depth control is set to the position it was when you started any movement down on the front will raise the box Right ??
That's why I said to have the rockshaft in the fully lowered position (lever all the way down). Then the movement of the front has no bearing on what the boxblade does, and yes, you can get a perfectly level surface like that. Just keep material in your box at all times. If when you use a boxblade you try to keep it at a certain height then that's your problem. You'll never get a smooth surface when doing it that way. Just push that lever to the floor and drive forward!!


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Two different uses going on here. Hard ground vs soft fill. You both are correct. Box blade works best on compacted ground. On soft fill it really isn't the correct tool. You can get close and then use a disc and drag to smooth out fill. Been there done that. :thumbup1gif:
 
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To get back on topic. I think that the OP, like others have said, should go with a rear blade and a boxblade. You can, however, dig into a hillside, create ditches, and crown the road with a boxblade only. I just think that it will go faster with both.

Here is an in fished photo of a road I built with just a boxblade. It's hard to see but the road is quite level side to side with a nice crown and ditches on either side.

I do have to note. It is almost a requirement that if you use a boxblade to get a hydraulic top link. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1452524667.070224.jpg


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