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Discussion Starter #1
My new 1025 r is up to 3.5 hrs on the clock. Still shiney and has only been used to blow wet heavy snow 1 time. Other than that, just been started to show friends, and yesterday with a wet heavy snow falling on my soft gravel drive after 3 days of rain, I actually just drove the tractor around to pack down the 2 inches of snow so when I do blow snow, maybe today, it wont dig in as much. Not being frozen, the shoes on this heavy blower have been digging in too much and pucking up stone even whenshoes are lowered all the way. Itll get better. Anyway I am wondering what I can expect to change as this engine breaks in. For the little I have used it, it seems to gulp fuel but I assume thats the wet heavy snow it blew and a tight engine. Does it get better? Also is there anything you suggest I keep an eye on as it breaks in? So far Ive spent more time standing and staring and waiting than actually using it. Keeping an eye open for rotary cutter and tiller but I guess I have a long winter to find those perfect deals. Im also thinking about a TSC carry all and/or bucket forks as well as the HH tooth bar. By spring it should be well decked out!
 

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When you're running at PTO speed you're going to use quite a bit of fuel, but it's still only something like a gallon an hour. Coming off a gas tractor I thought the fuel consumption was pretty low. As for the blower, you'll have to raise it a bit with the ground not being frozen or else it will dig in like you've experienced. Once the ground freezes and you can get a little layer of snow built up it should skid right over. Make sure your skids are set higher than the lowest bolt as well if you're going to be doing mainly a gravel driveway - my last tractor the dealer set the snowblower up for my driveway, with this one the skids weren't level or even tightened down.

I'm not really sure what you can expect as everything "breaks in," I just run mine and check the fluids\filters as it goes, and grease every so often. I've got about 50 hours on mine and plan on doing my oil\hydraulic change in the spring.

As for implements, Tractor Supply will run sales every few months on their rotary cutters and tillers. I got my tiller from there the last week of August when they were running a 15% of sale on them ($1349), but I remember the same sale in the early spring as well. I had to drive three hours to find it, but it happened to be in a state with no sales tax so that made up the difference. The only thing to really watch out for is that they don't take good care of their stuff and you might have to pick through to find a piece that's fairly rust free.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The shoes are already down as far as they will go. I learned that routine on my 425. Like you said, once the drive is frozen I will raise them up some. Right now they are leaving close to an inch of snow, which is fine with me. TSC said they have an annual event in December and if I sign up on their "Neighbors" list I will get 10% off anything from that event. Unless a steal comes along I am leaning toward their cutter. I do have a line on a sligjtly used 1149 tiller but it would be about tje same as a brand new TSC tiller so Im on the fence there. Im still getting used to tje machine but now that I have a weigjt bar and 400 lbs on the back I expect it to be even smoother blowing snow this time than the first time. Looks likenitll be 7 inches of wet heavy snow. More like a foot near the road. Should be a good test.
 

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*Always idle the engine down and let it run a minute or two at idle speed before shut down. Never shut it down at higher RPM's its hard on the engine.

My tractor uses 1.1 gallon of fuel when running nearly WOT and using the PTO. It burns just under 1 gallon per hour when not running the PTO.

*Avoid quick start up and shut down intervals. If you need to pull it out of the garage for a few minutes, leave it idling verses starting, shutting it off, starting it back up, etc. Idling for minutes won't do a thing except burn a small amount of fuel.

*ALWAYS, and I mean ALWAYS run only treated diesel fuel. Year around, every tank of fuel should be treated. No exceptions. Personally, I use Howe's diesel fuel treatment and like it. But there are several great choices, including Lucas, Red Line, Stanadyne, etc. Don't buy cheap fuel treatment as a quality product has added benefits such as fuel system lubricants to help the injector pump, etc. A $20 bottle of quality fuel treatment will treat up to 300 gallons of fuel.

*Make sure you are using only clean and proper Diesel Fuel storage jugs or cans. Never "re-purpose" another fuel jug for use with your new tractor. Get your tractor its own dedicated clean and proper fuel jugs. I started with (3) six gallon jugs and now I keep those plus another (6) 5 gallon fuel jugs. Remember, your machine will burn about 1 gallon of fuel per hour so you can determine how much fuel to keep on hand based upon your machine use. I do a lot of snow plowing so I keep a minimum of one weeks plowing fuel on hand. You won't need to start with the 48 gallons I have and use, but start with probably 2 of the 5 of 6 gallon diesel fuel jugs.

*Make sure to run the low viscosity hydro fluid in your machine year around. The cold weather thickens the hydro fluid and it makes the controls tough to move and the system slow to respond. The low viscosity is better than the regular viscosity for dealing with this issue.

*Follow the maintenance intervals and write down your service history in detail. I write mine on the blank pages of the Operators Manual, plus I keep it in my computer. Document the date, the machine hours, the exact things done. Please note that many of the service intervals are hourly or annually. So, if your machine clocks a lot of hours, plan to service based upon the hours. If your machine doesn't clock a lot of hours, then follow the service interval annually, and document the same way.

*Buy a Technical Service Manual for your use. Its the handiest tool for a new owner. Its the same information used by the Deere Service Technicians to service machines. Order this through your dealership and do NOT order one off Ebay unless it's from an authorized Deere dealer. These are not cheap, I think the CDRom is around $50 to $60 and the printed and bound book is about $125 to $140. Some like one style while others prefer the opposite. Get what suits you.

The lower cost service manuals often sold on Ebay and others are not the authentic Deere manuals and instead, are "general service manuals". Get the real Authorized and Authentic Deere information, it's the answer source to every technical question you are likely to have.


As my tractor broke in, I noticed the following;

- Fuel consumption has decreased to the level's I just indicated.

- The engine runs smoother and actually has less of the "diesel hammering" which is part of how these engines operate.

- It shakes less at start up and smokes much less at start up.

You are going to really enjoy your machine. If you have trouble with the b lower picking up too many stones, etc. you can add a 54" front blade for around $500. Often, it makes sense to have both snow removal systems. Certain snows are best dealt with by plowing where others by using the blower. Its nice to have the flexibility.

Congratulations on your new machine. Its exciting and these machines can help you complete tasks you didn't even know needed to be done. :good2:

And please make sure to post pictures and tell us about your use of the machine. The GTT family enjoys helping one another and answering questions regarding the myriad of implement and accessory choices. Welcome to GTT.....

:wgtt:
 

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*Always idle the engine down and let it run a minute or two at idle speed before shut down. Never shut it down at higher RPM's its hard on the engine.

My tractor uses 1.1 gallon of fuel when running nearly WOT and using the PTO. It burns just under 1 gallon per hour when not running the PTO.

*Avoid quick start up and shut down intervals. If you need to pull it out of the garage for a few minutes, leave it idling verses starting, shutting it off, starting it back up, etc. Idling for minutes won't do a thing except burn a small amount of fuel.

*ALWAYS, and I mean ALWAYS run only treated diesel fuel. Year around, every tank of fuel should be treated. No exceptions. Personally, I use Howe's diesel fuel treatment and like it. But there are several great choices, including Lucas, Red Line, Stanadyne, etc. Don't buy cheap fuel treatment as a quality product has added benefits such as fuel system lubricants to help the injector pump, etc. A $20 bottle of quality fuel treatment will treat up to 300 gallons of fuel.

*Make sure you are using only clean and proper Diesel Fuel storage jugs or cans. Never "re-purpose" another fuel jug for use with your new tractor. Get your tractor its own dedicated clean and proper fuel jugs. I started with (3) six gallon jugs and now I keep those plus another (6) 5 gallon fuel jugs. Remember, your machine will burn about 1 gallon of fuel per hour so you can determine how much fuel to keep on hand based upon your machine use. I do a lot of snow plowing so I keep a minimum of one weeks plowing fuel on hand. You won't need to start with the 48 gallons I have and use, but start with probably 2 of the 5 of 6 gallon diesel fuel jugs.

*Make sure to run the low viscosity hydro fluid in your machine year around. The cold weather thickens the hydro fluid and it makes the controls tough to move and the system slow to respond. The low viscosity is better than the regular viscosity for dealing with this issue.

*Follow the maintenance intervals and write down your service history in detail. I write mine on the blank pages of the Operators Manual, plus I keep it in my computer. Document the date, the machine hours, the exact things done. Please note that many of the service intervals are hourly or annually. So, if your machine clocks a lot of hours, plan to service based upon the hours. If your machine doesn't clock a lot of hours, then follow the service interval annually, and document the same way.

*Buy a Technical Service Manual for your use. Its the handiest tool for a new owner. Its the same information used by the Deere Service Technicians to service machines. Order this through your dealership and do NOT order one off Ebay unless it's from an authorized Deere dealer. These are not cheap, I think the CDRom is around $50 to $60 and the printed and bound book is about $125 to $140. Some like one style while others prefer the opposite. Get what suits you.

The lower cost service manuals often sold on Ebay and others are not the authentic Deere manuals and instead, are "general service manuals". Get the real Authorized and Authentic Deere information, it's the answer source to every technical question you are likely to have.


As my tractor broke in, I noticed the following;

- Fuel consumption has decreased to the level's I just indicated.

- The engine runs smoother and actually has less of the "diesel hammering" which is part of how these engines operate.

- It shakes less at start up and smokes much less at start up.

You are going to really enjoy your machine. If you have trouble with the b lower picking up too many stones, etc. you can add a 54" front blade for around $500. Often, it makes sense to have both snow removal systems. Certain snows are best dealt with by plowing where others by using the blower. Its nice to have the flexibility.

Congratulations on your new machine. Its exciting and these machines can help you complete tasks you didn't even know needed to be done. :good2:

And please make sure to post pictures and tell us about your use of the machine. The GTT family enjoys helping one another and answering questions regarding the myriad of implement and accessory choices. Welcome to GTT.....

:wgtt:
Is this the Howe's Diesel treatment you use?

https://www.howeslube.com/dieseltreat.php

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had read about Howes on here and I guess that stuck with me. I was at TSC and found it . I also picked up a nice shiney yellow can AND the replacemwnt nozzle and vent. I may pick up another 1 or 2 to keep a little more on hand. My intention iz to treat always, not just in the winter. Sully thankz for all the tips. Im always looking for a little edge. I have run Bobcats for about 35 years. Not my own but I always treated them like they were. Anything to make a piece of equipment last a little longer!
 

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*ALWAYS, and I mean ALWAYS run only treated diesel fuel. Year around, every tank of fuel should be treated. No exceptions. Personally, I use Howe's diesel fuel treatment and like it. But there are several great choices, including Lucas, Red Line, Stanadyne, etc. Don't buy cheap fuel treatment as a quality product has added benefits such as fuel system lubricants to help the injector pump, etc. A $20 bottle of quality fuel treatment will treat up to 300 gallons of fuel.
Everyone talks about other brand fuel treatments, I've just used the JD one in every tank. Only 37 hours and have switched to winter formula now but I am happy with it except for the awful odor of it!

Any reason others have swayed away from the JD one? I don't think it's that expensive for what you use in a tank, mind you the winter formula uses much more than the summer blend.

Kevin.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I saw it as an option and recognized it at TSC so grabbed it. Actually there were 3 bottles of Stanadyne also on the shelf. While I was trying to decide which to grab, a clerk came up with a customer on the phone, looked at the shelf, and told him "I have 3 bottles left". He took all 3 to set aside for him. Howes was my second choice. For $20 there may be enough there for a year.
A couple observations after my second snow blowing. I used almost a quarter tank, over a gallon, (I know thats an approximation) for running it a half hour. Yes, wet heavy snow, so Ill give it that. I sure miss the smaller blower on the 425 so far. With the extra width I admit it goes faster and has more traction, just harder to make fine adjustments and do a "pretty" job. Its also heavy on th skids and digs in to the driveway WAY more than the 47 did even with the skids all the way down. Im sure most of this is just adjusting to the new machine. I found the shute adjustment knob laying in the driveway. The bolt was a little long and Ive tighten3d it 3 times. I guess Ill leave it off. My plan is to put an actuator on it anyway. In scouting out the routing for wires I am amazed at how many things that were steel in 1994, are now plastic but I guess thats "progress". I know the JD videos brag about how they use plastic and the other guys still use steel which can rust and be dented. I guess Im a dinosaur. I still want steel. Im sure eventually I will love my 1025. I guess I better!
 

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Everyone talks about other brand fuel treatments, I've just used the JD one in every tank. Only 37 hours and have switched to winter formula now but I am happy with it except for the awful odor of it!

Any reason others have swayed away from the JD one? I don't think it's that expensive for what you use in a tank, mind you the winter formula uses much more than the summer blend.

Kevin.
I went with the Stanadyne because you use the same formula all year round. Trying to figure out when to switch from winter formula to summer formula and back the other way was making me crazy. To keep condensation out of the tank, I always keep mine full. Combine that with the unpredictability of the weather and you can be half way through winter before you've used up the summer formula in your tank. And to use up the previous season's tank full, you are going to get additional condensation in the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I dont see any reason not to use the Howse the same way except maybe back off the amount used a little in the summer. I am using the double dose they suggest for colder temps. Im sure the single dose would be fine in the summer and fall. In upstate NY we can be below zero without warning so better to be safe. We have already been below zero in November.
 

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The break in process is likely mentioned in your owners manual. There's really nothing to it, and I think for the most part just run it like you need to. The first oil change will come sooner than the normal interval. We have had many, many new pieces of equipment over the years. Never had an engine failure of any kind, but for the first 20 or so hours, we won't lug an engine or rev it over PTO rpm.

Regarding fuel treatment: In cold climates, I think it's a good idea in order to reduce the chance of fuel gelling. I personally have never used any fuel treatments and haven't had any injection pump or other fuel related problems. Is that the right choice? For me yes, others probably not.
 
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