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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had any experience using a tilt trailer for a 2305 sized tractor? it is rated for GVRW of 6000 lbs so am assuming I can put 4700 lbs of weight on it, GVWR - empty weight (1360#). Thoughts? Would be using for tractor, mower and bucket at times, no BH...or tractor and snowblower

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Bonehead Club Lackey
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I have a single axle trailer that is 12 feet long and 6½ feet wide. I use it to haul my 1026 with a loader and BB or tiller hooked to it all at the same time. Works great.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thought the rule of thumb was 10% of load weight on the hitch....
 

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I go by the way my truck sits after it's hooked up and loaded. Don't like the front or back of the truck sitting to high because of it. I like traction on both the front and rear of my truck.
 
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A 12' trailer for that combo isn't long enough. And I have an aversion to tilt trailers myself.

Most tilt trailers have the axle forward of the trailer centerline to allow the trailer to tilt, non tilt trailers have the axle mounted a little behind the center.

This creates two problems, 1) harder to back up, 2) harder to get the proper tongue weight.

But how do you move the tractor forward or back to get the proper weight distribution?
Agreed, 12' length doesn't give you enough room to move the load to get the proper weight distribution...

Isn't most of the weight supposed to go over the wheels on a trailer? Keeps the weight OFF hitch
You should have 60% of the weight forward of the trailer axle and that should give you 10% of the total weight on the hitch. i.e. 6,000# load equals 600# tongue weight. You want weight on the hitch for two reasons - the weight keeps the tongue on the ball and the proper load distribution keeps the trailer from "wagging".

I go by the way my truck sits after it's hooked up and loaded. Don't like the front or back of the truck sitting to high because of it. I like traction on both the front and rear of my truck.
This is where weight distribution hitches work their magic. Proper tongue weight and a level trailer / tow rig.
 
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Isn't most of the weight supposed to go over the wheels on a trailer? Keeps the weight OFF hitch
Grammatically speaking, YES. "Most" of the weight goes over the wheels. Some behind, most over, and some in front. That doesn't mean that "almost all" of the weight goes over the wheels.

A trailer is generally built so that about 10% of its own weight is what will be pushing straight down on the hitch when there is no payload. As you add cargo to the trailer, it is up to you to position it properly to maintain this general ratio. That might mean you add some weight in front of the trailer axles to add tongue weight, add some weight behind the axles to offset weight in front of the axles to reduce weight, or simply move the weight more directly over the axles and away from the front or rear.

If there is too little weight on the tongue, you will lose rear end traction and you will introduce significant sway as the trailer will attempt to "walk" back and forth on you. If you have too much weight on the tongue, you might damage the truck frame, the rear suspension, or might "unload" some of the weight up front and reduce braking and steering input. Maybe a combination of things!

When I've transported my tractor on an equipment trailer, I've used positioning of the machine to achieve the correct weight ratio on the tongue. In/on a trailer that is too short, you don't get any variability for positioning and you're sort of stuck with whatever the default is.

I go by the way my truck sits after it's hooked up and loaded. Don't like the front or back of the truck sitting to high because of it. I like traction on both the front and rear of my truck.
While the second half of your statement is perfectly reasonable, you could still be set up wrong. Too much weight on the tongue would put too much weight on the rear of the truck and remove weight from the front. That would be bad. So, you roll the machine back a little on the trailer and the trucks comes to rest at a better position for -the truck- to be in. The issue now is that you may not have ENOUGH tongue weight and the trailer is going to sway like crazy.

As rtgt stated - this is where a WDH comes in to ensure that you achieve:

1) Correct tongue weight as far as the trailer is initially concerned. This ensures that the trailer will track properly.
2) Correct tongue weight as far as the truck is concerned. This ensures no overloading of the rear of the truck.
3) Redistribution of excess weight to the front of the truck. This ensures correct weight on the front of the truck for steering and braking input.
 
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