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My 1025R has the Mauser cab and frankly, I have been extremely pleased with the cabs fit, finish, quality and it has dramatically altered my snow plowing experiences. The cab also caused my driveway snow plowing business to drastically expand, up to about 24 driveways in my neighborhood.

The cab changes the balance of the tractor, and I would say the change is "profound". I have been careful and properly ballasted my tractor. Between the narrow wheel tracking of this machine with the outside measurement of the rear tires at a mere 48" and the added 400 plus pounds of the cab weight, it was clear more was needed to help stabilize the machine.

I watched others make changes to their machine and I considered many different products, brands and approaches. After extensive consideration, I recently contacted Richard at Bro Tek Wheel spacers and spoke with him about the wheel spacers he makes and sells. He recommended the 3" rear wheel spacers and that was the width I was planning on purchasing.

Please note, he will make pretty much anything you need. Just because its not on his website, doesn't mean its not available. Call him and speak with him, he is a very knowledgeable and helpful man. He was pleasant and thorough and assured me I would be pleased with the wheel spacers he was sending me.

I ordered the wheel spacers and the total cost was $285. He mentioned he was giving me a break on the shipping costs, which I think reduced the cost from $300 to the $285. I ordered them during the days just before Labor Day and it took a week for them to get to me via the USPS.

Once I gave Richard the information about the product I wanted, and my contact information, he emailed me an Invoice and I paid the invoice and he promptly sent me a paid receipt and information about tracking the shipping.

The product was packed extremely well, here are photos of the package as I was opening it. Note, the way the wheel spacers were packed perfectly and the hardware was in the center of the two spacers.

The product is very nicely made and the machining is outstanding. My wife asked me why the wheel spacers are made "so pretty" if no one can even see them. I explained it's all part of the machining process of the billet aluminum blocks. The attention to detail is impressive, they fit PERFECTLY......
 

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Here is the stock wheel and tire position on the 1025R before the installation of the wheel spacers. The outside to outside measurement of the rear tire width in its stock configuration is 48". This picture really makes it look narrow.....:laugh:
 

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The installation process is very straight forward. Jack up the rear of the tractor and use safety jack stands to prevent any accidents or injuries. You will need a 19MM socket and extension and a torque wrench which accurately measures 89 foot pounds or 200 newton meters. These are the torque wrenches I use.
 

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A major improvement on the tractor using these wheel spacers is you end up using the new hardware and have wheel studs on which to set the wheels and secure the wheels, which is far easier than trying to align the wheel bolts when taking the wheels off and on the tractor.

Here is a comparison of the factory wheel bolts and the hardware which secures the wheel spacer to the axle. The longer wheel bolts are what hold the wheel spacers on the axle. All of the new hardware from Bro-Tek is very high quality.

I also took a picture of the wheel spacer inserted into the wheel so I could show how much the mounting position of the wheel spacers relocates the wheel position.
 

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Once I cleaned the wheel hub as well as the inside and outside of the wheel (hey, might as well shine them up while in there....) I mounted the wheel spacer on the hub and then systematically torqued the new spacer hardware to 89 foot pounds of torque, which for our metric friends, is 200 newton meters.......

Note the amount of the wheel spacer bolts extending through the axle flange when properly torqued.

Here is what the spacer looks like on the axle. I couldn't help but double up the spacers, envisioning the radical look of the machine. By the way, the 6" for the rear wheels would not be recommended by Bro-Tek. However, it is important to note that you could stack wheel spacers in this manner using the hardware and following directions.

I should mention at this point that I don't have a MMM, therefore I am not concerned about any clearance issues. If you do have a MMM, talk to Richard at Bro-Tek and he will explain what spacers would best work for your application.
 

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Once you mount the wheels on the properly torqued wheel spacers and triple check the spacer bolts to make sure they are properly torqued and tight as they should be, its time to mount the rear wheels on the new spacers.

Note the center position of the axle plate flange when the wheel is put on the wheel spacer and hand tightened. When the wheels are properly torqued, the center positioning flange of the axle pulls through the center of the wheel and everything is very nice and snug. The fit between the wheel spacers positioning flange and the wheels center is absolutely perfect.....

First picture is the position when the wheels are hand tight on the spacers.

Second picture shows the correct position of the wheel on the spacer and the positioning flange protruding through the center of the wheel, once the wheels are properly torqued.
 

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What a difference on the appearance of the tractor. More importantly, what an amazing difference in the stability. I drove the tractor over the transition from our driveway to the street, which is angled so the tractor doesn't cross the transition squarely, which previously meant the tractor would tip one direction and then the other, swaying due to the weight and the narrow tire track. I didn't notice the sway when crossing the transition, like I had before.

The appearance of the rear tires is also pretty radical from the stock position. I like the look of the tractor with the new wheel spacers and the wider tire tracks on the rear.

Its important to note that now, the outside of the rear tires is the same width as the front loader bucket, at 54'. Also, the new wheel position and tire track stance is the same as the factory 54" Deere / Frontier Snow plow when using the plow squared to the tractor. If you plow with the snow plow angled, the rear tires are going to be wider than the results of the angled snow plow. This is a good time for either the plow extensions or a wider snow plow. . The stock width went from 48" outside to outside on the rear tires and now it is 54", outside to outside.

Nice product, well made, expertly packed and shipped promptly and the wheel spacers fit with precision. I like the switch from using the wheel bolts to secure the wheels to wheel studs, which make mounting the tires and wheels easier.

Overall, I am very pleased with the product and extremely pleased with the improvement in the stability of the machine. While 3" per side is likely near the limit for this size machine, the impact it has on the tractor is profound. The tire track increase from 48" to 54' is a 12.5% increase in the track, which really helps stabilize the machine. I should have done this sooner, but its now done and that's what is important for increased safety.
 

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Those look like well made spacers.

Everyone seems to love wheel spacers on the 1025, maybe I'm weird but i like the factory offset, I've never felt unstable but I also don't have a loader on it.
 

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Those look like well made spacers.

Everyone seems to love wheel spacers on the 1025, maybe I'm weird but i like the factory offset, I've never felt unstable but I also don't have a loader on it.
The loader changes the machines balance and operation. You would be very surprised at the difference.

I took a video over the weekend while I was mowing with my rear RC2048 rear 3 point Frontier mower. I had one camera mounted on the upper part of the right loader arm upright and the other camera on the high point on the rear mower deck, looking backwards.

I need to get the video edited and posted (which is something I haven't done and haven't spent the time to learn. Too bad my 10 year old buddy next door moved, he could have shown me how to do it..:laugh:..) as the one thing which really surprised me was the amount of movement of the FEL frame on the tractor as it works across the field. Since the camera is mounted right on top of the loader arm, you could see the movement of the loader arms, which I had never noticed before. As you navigate the bumps and rest of the field, there is a lot of shifting and movement by the entire loader frame.

The wheel spacers were precisely because of the movement and side to side pitch in the field and in the bumps. The loader is the first change to the stock machine. The second and greatest change to the machines balance is the cab.

Having a wider foot print will help with both of these on any machine which has them.

I drove a 1025r at the dealer which didn't have a FEL or a cab and its balance felt similar to that of the x700 series. Most of us who have Mauser cabs won't end up removing them seasonally, as its quite a project and involves many electrical components and harnesses, etc. plus the ROPS has to be reinstalled when the cab is removed. Even the ROPS changes the balance of the machine when you put it down. Its not a great deal, but on sidehills, etc. the weight up higher is noticeable with the ROPS up, verses down.

The base 1025R weighs 1,444 pounds according to John Deere. The 120R Loader weighs 543 pounds, the bucket weighs 155 pounds, according to Deere. I would assume the listed weight of 543 includes the 155 for the bucket. So the FEL adds more than 35% of the tractor's base weight to the machine. Carrying the FEL with any load in it with the bucket up higher than the hood height really changes the machines balance, to the point of making it potentially dangerous.

Every option added changes the machines balance.

The backhoe weighs another 610 pounds with the 16" bucket.

You hang 550 pounds on the front for a FEL and then 610 pounds on the back for a backhoe now the 1,444 pound machine weighs 2,600 pounds in round numbers, and that doesn't include the operator.

Deere lists the front axle capacity at 1,349 pounds and 1,576 pounds for the rear axle. That's a total weight on the machine of 2,925 pounds, which is only 325 pounds more than the machine weighs with the FEL and Backhoe on it..........I find that interesting.....

Here is the listed source of the weights and specifications.....

Sub-Compact Utility Tractors | 1025R | John Deere US
 
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What a difference on the appearance of the tractor. More importantly, what an amazing difference in the stability. I drove the tractor over the transition from our driveway to the street, which is angled so the tractor doesn't cross the transition squarely, which previously meant the tractor would tip one direction and then the other, swaying due to the weight and the narrow tire track. I didn't notice the sway when crossing the transition, like I had before.

The appearance of the rear tires is also pretty radical from the stock position. I like the look of the tractor with the new wheel spacers and the wider tire tracks on the rear.

Its important to note that now, the outside of the rear tires is the same width as the front loader bucket, at 54'. Also, the new wheel position and tire track stance is the same as the factory 54" Deere / Frontier Snow plow when using the plow squared to the tractor. If you plow with the snow plow angled, the rear tires are going to be wider than the results of the angled snow plow. This is a good time for either the plow extensions or a wider snow plow. . The stock width went from 48" outside to outside on the rear tires and now it is 54", outside to outside.

Nice product, well made, expertly packed and shipped promptly and the wheel spacers fit with precision. I like the switch from using the wheel bolts to secure the wheels to wheel studs, which make mounting the tires and wheels easier.

Overall, I am very pleased with the product and extremely pleased with the improvement in the stability of the machine. While 3" per side is likely near the limit for this size machine, the impact it has on the tractor is profound. The tire track increase from 48" to 54' is a 12.5% increase in the track, which really helps stabilize the machine. I should have done this sooner, but its now done and that's what is important for increased safety.
Hi SB, what does that do to the front? Does he recommend putting spacers on the front too? Did it change the 4x4 operation at all? Curious to know how it turns in 4x4 in the dirt of course with a loaded fel and without? Have you tried that yet?

I have been thinking about adding some width to mine just to improve the ride.

Thanks!
WB
 

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Hi SB, what does that do to the front? Does he recommend putting spacers on the front too? Did it change the 4x4 operation at all? Curious to know how it turns in 4x4 in the dirt of course with a loaded fel and without? Have you tried that yet?

I have been thinking about adding some width to mine just to improve the ride.

Thanks!
WB
Wenton - I only have the inch and a half spacers (Bro-tek, and I also had a great experience with them), but it has not made any noticeable difference to to the tractor's performance in 4x4 or while using the loader, OTHER THAN A FAIRLY DRAMATIC INCREASE IN STABILITY! The 3" spacers must feel incredible. It almost makes me sad i have a MMM limiting my wheel width.

Btw... great looking tractor, Sully... and welcome to the wheel spacer fan club!
 

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Wenton - I only have the inch and a half spacers (Bro-tek, and I also had a great experience with them), but it has not made any noticeable difference to to the tractor's performance in 4x4 or while using the loader, OTHER THAN A FAIRLY DRAMATIC INCREASE IN STABILITY! The 3" spacers must feel incredible. It almost makes me sad i have a MMM limiting my wheel width

Thanks. :thumbup1gif: I have the mmm to so I will be limited also. Thats ok though. I just want to improve the ride! I haven't had any issues so far.
 
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Hi SB, what does that do to the front? Does he recommend putting spacers on the front too? Did it change the 4x4 operation at all? Curious to know how it turns in 4x4 in the dirt of course with a loaded fel and without? Have you tried that yet?

I have been thinking about adding some width to mine just to improve the ride.

Thanks!
WB
No, it is not suggested that you add any wheel spacers on the front, with the exception being if you have to run front wheel chains or terra grips and need the clearance, then a minimal wheel spacer could be used. Since the front axle has a center pivot, it doesn't benefit from a stability perspective to add the front wheel spacer as the tractor will pivot on the axle center pivot, which is going to impact the additional benefit of adding front wheel spacers.

The turning seems more sure footed than it did before. I noticed no reduction in turning dimensions or did it seem to negatively impact the use of the machine. The only down side I can see is that the added width of the tires will track outside of some implements, like the angled front stock sized 54" snow plow, rototillers, etc. But my snow plow is 87" wide and I don't have a rototiller. My core aerator is 60" wide so that's not an issue and with the core aerator, it really wouldn't matter if the tires were running wider than the attached implement.

Other than the tires now protruding well outside of the fenders which will cause some tire debris to be thrown up on the side of the cab and fenders, the added stability far outweighs the issues with the possibly having extra dirt to deal with.............

If you are looking for greater stability, I would encourage you to consider the wheel spacers. Just be aware that there are width limitations on what you can put on the machine when you use a Mid Mount Mower. Talk to Richard at Bro-Tek and he can advise you the maximum widths which will work with the MMM................

It sure is nice to put the rear wheels on wheel studs and not have to balance the wheels and tires while trying to line up the wheel bolts. Slide the wheels on the wheel studs, add the lug nuts and torque.....:good2:

Let me know if you decide to proceed with wheel spacers.......and what size you choose.
 
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Awesome presentation Sulley. I have some sloped ditches at the front of my property by the road, and I really put my 1025R on the edge when I go in them to mow. I been thinking about spacers, and your statement of having a MMM will limit the width of application to 1.5”? I wonder how much of a difference it will make and if it’s worth the time and investment.
 
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Awesome presentation Sulley. I have some sloped ditches at the front of my property by the road, and I really put my 1025R on the edge when I go in them to mow. I been thinking about spacers, and your statement of having a MMM will limit the width of application to 1.5”? I wonder how much of a difference it will make and if it’s worth the time and investment.
I while I don't have a mmm I ended up putting 1.5 spacers on my 1025 and it made a huge difference to the stability of my tractor:bigthumb:
 

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I while I don't have a mmm I ended up putting 1.5 spacers on my 1025 and it made a huge difference to the stability of my tractor:bigthumb:
You wouldnt think 3" would make that much difference. I'm gonna have to put some on my 2032r. I'm just concerned about bearing loading with the spacers
 

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Dealer is setting up my 2025 this week. I am am having them install 2" spacers with juice in the tires which will add over 400 lbs at the base. This is my first 2025, so I dont have anything to compare to, but fluid should help.

My Mauser will have extra lights, strobe, sound, rear wiper, almost every option possible except air conditioning. So that will add to the weight upstairs also. If I still think its tippy I may add wheel weights also. That's my 2 cents, great info in this thread and happy to be add a tad.
 

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Dealer is setting up my 2025 this week. I am am having them install 2" spacers with juice in the tires which will add over 400 lbs at the base. This is my first 2025, so I dont have anything to compare to, but fluid should help.

My Mauser will have extra lights, strobe, sound, rear wiper, almost every option possible except air conditioning. So that will add to the weight upstairs also. If I still think its tippy I may add wheel weights also. That's my 2 cents, great info in this thread and happy to be add a tad.
I've found my 2032r a bit tippy and wish i had of had the dealer add spacers. Guess i will have to do it myself this winter
 

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Awesome presentation Sulley. I have some sloped ditches at the front of my property by the road, and I really put my 1025R on the edge when I go in them to mow. I been thinking about spacers, and your statement of having a MMM will limit the width of application to 1.5”? I wonder how much of a difference it will make and if it’s worth the time and investment.
I have the 1.4” spacers because I have the 54” mmm. My tractor has the Mauser cab now which I purchased with the tractor but didn’t have it installed for about 4 months. I cut grass all last summer without the cab and it was not quite as stable as my old x728 but it was acceptable. When I had the cab installed cutting my slopes alongside the house created an Extreme “pucker factor”. I immediately had to change to straight up and down cutting along the road and a very slow side cut on the slopes which was far scarier then I expected. I was concerned enough to add my 8 suitcase weights onto the heavy hitch 3 point mount. To my surprise, the rear weights didn’t really help with the side stability.

I added the 1.4” spacers because that was the widest recommendation for my 54” mmm. They did help but did not alleviate the problem. I then added 200# of wheel weights and that improved the side to side stability and the tractor felt more planted on the slopes.

I’m satisfied that I will not tip the tractor over but it is still not as good as it was before the cab install or anywhere near as stable as my x728. I really wanted the Mauser cab but never expected how much it would change the center of gravity. Without the cab I’m convinced the spacer and wheel weights would have made the 1025r feel like my x728 or better.

I would recommend the 3” spacers if you don’t have the mmm. Sometimes I wish I would have just kept my x728 to cut the grass. The additional costs increasing the stability of the 1025r were never anticipated. I found the 200# of wheel weights on Craigslist for $175.00 which was about 1/2 of what I would have spent if I purchased new.

If you have any concerns about stability, spend whatever amount of money it takes to alleviate the problem. Without the cab I’m confident the 1.4” spacers will make a big difference in 1025r stability.
 
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