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I have a land pride brush hog hooked up to my John Deere 5210 tractor. I have been experiencing the issue the bolt that hooks from the pto shaft into the gear box keeps breaking amidst the middle of brush hogging my meadow. Is there a reason for this, I have two bolts break in the matter of 2 days now, and replacing the bolt isn't fun because I can't get my hands inside there guard to slide the bolt into the pto shaft and the gear box at the same time. So I had to remove the guard after yesterday the bolt breaking. Is there a way to avoid from having the bolts break. Any help would be greatly appreciated, also got tractor last year so beginner.
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That's a shear bolt, to protect the tractor and implement from damage when you encounter something that stops the blades from spinning. You also have a slip clutch, I would say the slip clutch is not adjusted properly therefore not slipping, that is what is causing the shear bolts to break.
 

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His slip clutch may be fine (or may not) and what he is using for bolts are entirely too soft.
 

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What did you hit that caused the bolts to shear?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When I purchased the tractor last year the guy salesmen I bought it from had the people put it together for me, so I have personally not done anything besides replace the bolt that keeps breaking. How would I go about adjusting the clutch? Will post a photo of the bolts I am using at the moment. I had to replace the one last year when I first got it as well. But that held up through the year but broke this year first time using it. Then I replaced and it broke this one as well. I am brush hogging a meadow, although it is hilly I didn't hit any branches or rocks or anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When I purchased the tractor last year the guy salesmen I bought it from had the people put it together for me, so I have personally not done anything besides replace the bolt that keeps breaking. How would I go about adjusting the clutch? Will post a photo of the bolts I am using at the moment. I had to replace the one last year when I first got it as well. But that held up through the year but broke this year first time using it. Then I replaced and it broke this one as well. I am brush hogging a meadow, although it is hilly I didn't hit any branches or rocks or anything.
 

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I have never adjusted it, only have used this like 3 times, but I just watched a video on how to do so. I may go ahead and give it a try and see if it stops it from breaking.
Do you have the manual for the cutter? If you do, the steps to adjust the clutch should be in that. I run the same combination of bolts and a slip clutch on mine and have never broke a bolt. Once adjusted it should take care of this.
 

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I've heard that those County Line shear bolts are junk (too soft). Mike Morgan from Outdoors with the Morgan's (on YouTube) just did a video where he broke 3 in 1 day.
 
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Shear bolt is supposed to be grade 2 hardness. People do go up to 5 sometimes. 8 if you would rather break something more expensive than a bolt during failure....
A grade 5 bolt with the slip clutch is probably a good combination.
 

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Slip clutches are affected by the weather. As such, they no longer slip and have to be adjusted. Put a mark on the slip clutch. Then loosen up the bolts a little at a time until that mark moves. Tighten up a little bit and go mow. If the mark moves again, tighten up a little more until the mark no longer moves.

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I think slip clutches have a torque value that is determined by the horsepower the implement is rated for. Somewhere in the manual there should be a horsepower rating for the implement. Then the bolts are adjusted to the implement’s rating. That way you aren’t destroying a 40hp rated mower with a 70 hp tractor. I have seen manuals that are very specific and some that are vague as far as the bolt tightening/loosening procedure. It sounds like these are set too high and the shear bolt is the”fuse”. But before I would mess with adjustments I would go buy a US made grade 2 bolt and see if that solves the problem. And it is possible for a slip clutch to seize and be useless for what it’s designed to do. It’s usually recommended to check them yearly especially if it sits outside. I have a Landpride like yours and have yet to break a bolt, and an old Woods with no slip clutch that breaks bolts every year.
 
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I’ve seen slip clutch instructions that say to compress the spring to a certain length, leave so many exposed threads on the end of the bolt or my baler says to adjust the clutch so it slips with 100 pounds at the end of a 2’ wrench on the PTO shaft.
I’d loosen the spring bolts on the clutch a half turn at a time then run the PTO until you get it to slip then tighten up 1/2 turn at a time until it no longer slips when cutting.
 
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