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Discussion Starter #1
I've been searching for a piece of pipe to build a lawn roller. I think I found one today. Is there a consensus about how much weight per foot is needed for a lawn roller?

Based on my calculations if I filled it full of water I could have 240lbs per foot or 66lbs per foot if it's bone dry. The pipe is 10' and make a 6' roller for myself and maybe build and sell a 4'roller to cover navigation costs.

Is 240lbs/foot enough to knock down high spots?
 

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I would think it depends on the type of soil and how dry it is.
Mine is a bit like clay, once it gets real dry it is real hard.
At the moment it is still wet and I'm more likely to get stuck again.
Sadly, my yard tends to dry out in different areas at different times so I would have optimum rolling in stages. The real challenge is to get through the wet spots to get to the almost dry spots.
This year has been very wet (still is) and I have a lot of ruts to roll. The mower already complains of running across the train tracks no matter what direction I go. Unless I get stuck again.
Then there are the rocks I haven't dug up yet. They can change the shape of many rollers.

I really have no idea what is a good weight per foot. I have a store bought, 4' wide that when filled with water is supposed to be 920 lbs. I just haven't been able to use it yet.
 

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....if your rolling mud with ruts you will create ruts...

....if your rolling rocks into the dirt you need the roller shell thick enough not to dent....

....if your rolling down mole tracks etc.....about anything will work

....if your trying to roll mounds of dirt ...get a box blade....

...in dozers a ground pressure of 6-7psi will start to displace soft soil a bit....ground pressures of 3-5psi will usually float in soft soils so do the math...i would proably want 10psi if i were building a field roller for pushing in rocks..

...at 240# a foot ..if it has a effective contact patch of 2" (contact would depend on pipe size)_ ...240/12=20#/2"=10psi
 

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...240/12=20#/2"=10psi
Should that be 20 psi?

Oops my mistake - 2" X 12" of ground contact = 10 psi. Good thing I don't design bridges....
 

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You need to know the number of square inches of contact area your roller will have with the ground. So if your roller touches 2 inches wide of ground and it is 60 inches wide then it has a contact area of 2 x 60 = 120 square inches of contact area.

If your roller filled with water weighs 480 pounds than the pressure per square inch is 480 divided by 120 which is 4 pounds per square inch.
 

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I'm thinking of using a 300 gallon propane tank to make mine...some day...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the responses, if I build this roller in the near future I will post pictures of the final product.
 

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This is the roller that I made.

24" concrete culvert that I got from a local plant that was damaged.
I cut it down to 5', 1 1/2" axle, 22-60# bags of concrete.
I haven't weighed it but I figure it weighs about 2300#.
 

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I have a DIY roller,,,
what I have found is that velocity has much to do with the capability to flatten.

the force pushing obstacles equals the weight times the velocity squared.

If you increase the weight by 4X,, the force increases 4X,,,

but,,
if you move the roller 4X faster,,, the force increases 16X,,, :flag_of_truce:

Make the tow vehicle go as fast as possible,, for better flattening,,,:good2:

NOTE,, this requires a STRONG roller,, my roller is made out of 1/2" thick ductile iron,,
I have hit rocks in the driveway at full tractor speed,, my concrete filled roller can jump 6 inches into the air!!
 
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