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Finally, I can justify having a Scut. My 1025r hasn’t been sweated yet. That being said, we are buying 4 acres of farm flat land and building our dream house. What attachments do I need and want! I already know a 260B because of all my landscaping needs.

I am thinking a post hole attachment for the needed fence. That being said, how do these tractors do handling it? It’s clay but no roots or rocks.

Debating if my 60D is sufficient or if a bush hog is waned for the larger open field mows until I really have it landscaped.

Go! Budget isn’t unlimited but it’s realistic. CFO already approved. Realistic things please.


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If the table is wide open then get ALL of the implements. One of everything.
 

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Early 2017 Vintage 1025R TLB (260/H120)
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I guess I don’t understand this. How can you buy implements without knowing your actual needs?

Now once you are there and see a need - then buy that implement.
This - storing implements that you don't use is expensive (if you keep them covered) and takes up a lot of space. Get what you need for the task at hand (I'd take the approved CFO money and put it in a bucket for those projects for when they're needed.) Things like a PHD, if you need it for one task really, rent it from CL... i.e. buy a used one, use it, and sell it for about what you paid (or more if you get a good deal).
 

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If you have a good rental place in your area who rents SCUT implements, I would start there for the limited use items, like post Hole Diggers, etc. Things like the landscape rake will be handy for the final site work, but then you likely won't need it much afterwards. Rent what you are going to use just a few times if you can.

I have sold a number of Frontier Implements which I used and then no longer needed and they sell very easily in my area. I don't think it took more than a week to sell a single one on WasteBook Marketplace. Just be careful to not pay too much and make sure you know what you have in each implement when you sell them. In most cases, I sold them for anywhere between 80% to 95% of what I paid for them when I bought them in a group.

If you don't have pallet forks, you will definately need those and keep them, so get what you want. Don't waste extra capacity consuming the lifting capacity as the lightest weight forks are likely just fine. other stuff, i would wait until closer to the project as its likely to change.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you have a good rental place in your area who rents SCUT implements, I would start there for the limited use items, like post Hole Diggers, etc. Things like the landscape rake will be handy for the final site work, but then you likely won't need it much afterwards. Rent what you are going to use just a few times if you can.

I have sold a number of Frontier Implements which I used and then no longer needed and they sell very easily in my area. I don't think it took more than a week to sell a single one on WasteBook Marketplace. Just be careful to not pay too much and make sure you know what you have in each implement when you sell them. In most cases, I sold them for anywhere between 80% to 95% of what I paid for them when I bought them in a group.

If you don't have pallet forks, you will definately need those and keep them, so get what you want. Don't waste extra capacity consuming the lifting capacity as the lightest weight forks are likely just fine. other stuff, i would wait until closer to the project as its likely to change.
Good idea with the rentals. I didn’t realize I could rent a post hole 3pt. That would be great because it is just a weekend used project overall. Does this machine handle them well?

Good call with a rake - will have a lot of that needed.


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I can tell you the 60D is not for cleaning up rough ground. It is only for finish mowing. Seems like you're confused as to your needs. I may suggest to get someone to clean up the property, bushog, land level and etc. Then use your 1025R for mowing and light maintenance. Maybe pickup a box blade, grader blade. One can have tons of equipment that they never use or use only a time or two a year. I've had all types and generally just a minimum would have surficed.
 

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We bought 2.6 acres with an OLD farmhouse and barn.
We then bought a 1025r TLB.
Over the course of the addition and landscaping we added:
Pallet forks
5' Box blade (doubles as ballast)
6' rear blade
Rotary tiller
40 gal boom sprayer
54" Mid Mount Mower
Post Hole Digger
3 point chipper
FEL mounted snow blade (home made)
2 point receiver hitch (home made)

We have been very happy to have all of it over the last 5 years.
I have backfilled foundations, dug out stumps, mowed weeds, prepped for lawn, installed irrigation lines and drainage lines, sprayed fertilizer/herbicides, planted orchard, installed 8' tall deer exclusion fencing, plowed snow, unloaded trucks, spread gravel, moved sand and mulch and probably more that I have forgotten about.

We bought implements as we saw a need.
 

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Pallet forks are a must. Bucket teeth are very helpful for digging. Rather than a rotary cutter I’d prefer to have a flail mower, but I have a rotary cutter that does the job and I’ve had it a long time. Buying new I’d go with a flail mower. Landscape rake and box blade are two things I use a lot for many different tasks. For best advice, I’d start a post for each project and ask what everyone on here suggests would work best and make the job the easiest. There are many small manufacturers out here that make high quality products at fair price that you will find out about too.
*update your location on your profile too. That makes it easier to give you more specific advice to your geography.
 

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Forgot to mention rear ballast. You NEED that with a front loader. And wheel weights and or filled rear tires. Check your loafers manual for exact minimum weights required for your tractor.
 

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I am thinking a post hole attachment for the needed fence. That being said, how do these tractors do handling it? It’s clay but no roots or rocks.
Unlike most suggestions here, I bought almost all my implements when I bought the tractor. Why? Because I got 0% interest for 5 years, and I knew I would rather roll it all into that than try to come up with $500 here and $2000 there later on.

I got a 1025r TLB with a PHD, a rotary cutter, a tiller, a rear blade, and a box blade. I later added a boom pole and a quick hitch. The only one I haven't gotten use from has been the rear blade, which I got for clearing snow off the driveway. And I haven't been there when it was snowing yet. But I bought them all with specific uses in mind and needed them all. Figure out what you need to do and buy the tool to do it.

Re the PHD in clay soil, I have clay soil and it does a decent job when it works. Sometimes it can be an exercise in frustration. My advice, buy plenty of shear bolts. 😄 Also, in my area, it works well in all seasons but summer. When that clay is dried and hard it's like trying to drill into ceramics! It will still work, but it takes way more time and effort!
 

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Pallet forks are a must. Bucket teeth are very helpful for digging. Rather than a rotary cutter I’d prefer to have a flail mower, but I have a rotary cutter that does the job and I’ve had it a long time. Buying new I’d go with a flail mower. Landscape rake and box blade are two things I use a lot for many different tasks. For best advice, I’d start a post for each project and ask what everyone on here suggests would work best and make the job the easiest. There are many small manufacturers out here that make high quality products at fair price that you will find out about too.
*update your location on your profile too. That makes it easier to give you more specific advice to your geography.
I agree with the flail mower comment, with an important asterisk. It has to be a proven brand with parts availability and supported by a dealership network, hopefully with a dealer in my area. Too many of the Flail mowers I have seen are made in China, Ebay sold units which is what the Titan unit is. I would want not part of that.

Some of the very good Flail mowers seem to come from Italy and Everything Attachments was one online source that sold them last time I looked. But they are about triple the cost of a rotary mower..........I too would prefer a flail mower for how they cut and for cutting the road sides, etc. Buyers of the flail mowers need to understand how they are maintained as well, as the cutting mechanism is completely different and involves 40 to 80 blades, depending upon the size of the mower.

I used the 60" mower on my 455 to cut rough fields and it handles it, but it wrecks the blades and it always requires at least one cross cutting or simply driving forward 8' cutting, backing over and mowing the same area and then pulling forward again. Its time consuming and a rear rotary cutter is certainly more efficient and more task suited.

You pound on the spindle bearings really hard cutting stuff with the MMM that should be cut with the rotary cutter. You have to grease them with every use and watch them carefully. Knock out a spindle or two or break a gear box hitting something with the MMM and it will cost half or more for what one would have paid for the rotary cutter with the slip clutch.............
 

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You definitely want a bush hog or flail mower for cutting taller grass. I took my 2305 out to my church's serve day project last summer and cut about 3 or 4 acre's of grass that had been previously bush hogged with the 54c deck, and it did cut it, but it was a little taxing for it. I had to stop a few times and let the coolant temp get back down to a safer level.
 

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We were in your position a year ago. We decided to get the 1025R with all the expensive proprietary equipment with the tractor to finance everything. Purchased a 60D, 120R and a 260B with the tractor and rolled them all into one payment plan. Outside those items, there are plenty of options for other attachments and implements from 3rd party manufacturers.

For brush and longer grass, you'll want a rotary cutter. If you get one, get a quick hitch as well. They can be found most farm stores and online. I say get on e before you start accumulating 3pt attachments because you don't want to fit PTO shafts without a QH and then decide later that you want one. I think the two most used 3pt attachments are the rotary cutters and tillers.

I've seen good and bad about post hole diggers on a 1025R, but generally they are good as long as you're watching the dig. I would go too big, if you want to put in 4" posts, it should be fine.

Don't forget to load the back tires for added weight. Other things like pallet forks, and other attachments can be bought later, so it is really up to you and what you can get through your dealer.

Good luck.
 

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A different viewpoint here, the 60" MMM will do everything you need to cut on a flat 4 acres. I just mowed 1 1/2 ac of 3 foot tall weeds with mine and it did a great job. Only the first mowing will be more difficult, After the first cutting you will be able to keep all the grass less than 5" high with the 60"MMM. So, that being sail, I would not buy any other flail mower or brush hog mower. Whey you are mowing use low range and watch the temp gauge, if it starts getting hot, stop and clean the screens and remove any grass blockage, Keep a paint brush in your tool box to brush off the screens. When mowing regular grass it is OK to do it in High Range.
 

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I would suggest a landscape rake to start. VERY handy to clean up stuff. Add wheels if you can. A lot depends on how your "lawn" looks now, and what you want to do with it. Bucket and backhoe are as handy as a pocket on a t-shirt!:)

A little trailer might come in handy, or something like bigtoolrack.com I got some stuff from Heavy Hitch to make weights easier to store/move/mount, and a cool dolly to move my 54" mower deck. Grub and skidding chains are good to have. Out of all my stuff, I guess I use my pallet forks the most.
 

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PHD in clay is no problem as long as you don’t screw it into the ground. You will want to pop it up a bit repeatedly as you dril to clear the hole. I have seen if you just let it run it will auger down and lift your front tires off the ground. At that point you are digging our spinning the PTO shaft backwards with a pipe wrench to get it out.
 
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I was in your shoes about 3 years ago. My wife and I parceled off 18 acres from my family farm and built our house on it. I purchased a 3025e though, I felt like the larger frame was better suited for some of the 3pt implements I wanted to rent / purchase. I would recommend a 4 in 1 bucket on your tractor, this will come in handy for backfilling your foundation, spreading gravel for your driveway, grading. The challenge I had mainly was grading the lot, we moved about 6k yards of dirt total and seeded the 5 acre lawn area.

I rented a Harley rake, seeder, landscape rake to help grade and seed my lawn. Fortunately, I also had the use of a D4 cat dozer 333g deer skid steer and excavator to do the big stuff.

I agree with the other comments, rent what you can, and purchase attachments as needed. What type of work / tasks are you planning to tackle during the construction of your home?
 

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PHD in clay is no problem as long as you don’t screw it into the ground. You will want to pop it up a bit repeatedly as you dril to clear the hole. I have seen if you just let it run it will auger down and lift your front tires off the ground. At that point you are digging our spinning the PTO shaft backwards with a pipe wrench to get it out.
I don't know about a PHD on a SCUT but even with larger tractors you have to lift the auger out to keep it from becoming a screw. The worst thing for us is if we happen to get right beside a large root and the cutting edge slides past but the flights catch. The same thing could happen with a rock. In our case we have to be careful with the 3ph to not bend the digger frame. I would think on a SCUT would lift the front wheels or run out of lift.

I would think the auger on a SCUT would have to be shorter than the 4' or so we have on our digger. We've only got a foot or so of ground clearance when the 3ph is all the way up and that's on a 70 hp tractor.

Treefarmer
 

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Thinking outloud, after just spending more than I would like to on suitcase weights, that's something I wish I had rolled in to the 0% loan. I plan to buy the same amount (2-42s, 2-70's) again after the bank recovers, but if it had been rolled in to the loan I'd have 8-70s and 4-42s. Another positive is there's usually further discounts on attachments saving some more money when bought with the tractor. Adding an extra ~16.67/mo (5yr @ 0%) for 728lbs of flexible ballast is totally worth it. Further thinking outloud- paying for suitcase weight ballast outright is painful, considering how expensive it is for what it is. When rolled in to a 0% loan is so much more palatable cause you don't see the line items for every payment.
 
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