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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all! I have a 1026r that I've had since 2012 and have been looking at getting additional attachments for it, as well as possibly making some of my own, in the future (still learning about hydraulics). For the most part, turning the tractor off to (dis)connect a rear attachment, via the Power Beyond kit, isn't an issue, but when you do it frequently enough, I would imagine that's quite hard on the starter and engine. What I'd like to know is if anyone is aware of a valve I could install that would allow me to safely redirect the constant flow of the power beyond and depressurize the part of the line that normally carries the flow to the attachment so I can disconnect said attachment without having to constantly turn the machine on and off? I'm guessing the return line isn't pressurized, so that part might not be as important, but a valve that would allow me to redirect the flow without overheating the system would still be needed. Anyone know if such a valve exists in a size suitable for a 1-series?
 

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Short answer is no, just turn off the machine-it's really not that much wear-and-tear.
 

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Though you probably couldn't disconnect a pressurized QD, I wouldn't feel comfortable disconnecting any line with the engine running. Valves can leak with wear, be not fully turned/diverted, forgot to be turned etc. etc. so I couldn't be absolutely certain that there was no pressure behind the disconnect. High pressure hydraulics and skin don't mix very well, so why take the chance. Shutting off the engine and relieving the pressure by exercising the control valves is (in my own mind) the ONLY way to be certain there is no pressure in the system and safe to disconnect. Matter of fact, I'd turn off the engine and relieve pressure before placing my hands near anything that may have hydraulic pressure behind it, which means hoses, cylinders, QD's, etc (as much as possible). A high pressure microscopic stream from a tiny leak is almost invisible, but will inject through the skin before you know it.

Good advice above, shut off the engine.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hmm, main reason I asked is I had plans to eventually build a dump-trailer that could be connected via a quick-hitch and have a shielded block for connecting and disconnecting said trailer while protecting the user from any residual pressure that might not get relieved; the user's hands would never be able to be in direct contact with the hydraulic couplers until well after they've been disconnected (and possibly even then). The valve for operating the trailer would remain with it, when disconnected, allowing the user to depressurize the trailer's hydraulics once the system is bypassed and before disconnecting. In fact, the safety feature I planned to implement would REQUIRE that the user remove all residual energy from the system, before they would even be able to attempt a disconnect, and any pressure remaining on the system would keep the locking mechanism in place, preventing any attempts to disconnect it, protecting the user from disconnecting a pressurized system, regardless of whether the system is active or inactive.

I got the valve idea from a CNC mill I work with that has a built-in clamping system for each pallet, and operates in a similar fashion, allowing pallets to swap while the system is still running, and shielding the users from any possible leakage. Unlike my idea, though, the pressure on this system remains until the disconnect process has already begun, due to the way the clamping system works. That said, it's impossible to get anywhere near this system, while it's active, unless you bypass multiple safety locks, in which case, you get what you deserve...

The connector system I want to build you would have to physically cut thick steel in order to bypass the safety mechanism. Not something anyone is likely to do. The safety mechanism ideas are still a work in progress, but are something I always prioritize over all else. I always try to consider all possible ways someone can be injured by a faulty, or even non-faulty system and how to protect against it (it is part of my job, after all).

I've seen the horrors of what happens when things go wrong when working with hydraulic systems. I've also seen what happens when an "inactive" and "depressurized" system (engine shut off and valve actuated) suddenly receives pressure due to unforeseen residual energy (thanks gravity...) and suddenly pressurizes the system. Shutting the engine off and actuating the valve does not 100% guarantee safety from hydraulic pressure injury, either, it only reduces the likelihood of it by a significant degree. The only reason I even bothered asking about such a valve is to save myself having to "reinvent the wheel".
 
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