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Discussion Starter #1
I found this little camp stove online for $100. Been looking for a way to heat a 10x20 greenhouse for the winter. I used a kerosene heater last year but that got a bit expensive. So I was thinking run the wood stove when I am around and use kerosene when I'm not. I found propane to be a little inefficient compared to the kerosene heater. Would a stove work? I thought I might pipe it out one of the endwalls through some sort of material that won't mind heat or catch fire. (Not greenhouse film)
 

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I found this little camp stove online for $100. Been looking for a way to heat a 10x20 greenhouse for the winter. I used a kerosene heater last year but that got a bit expensive. So I was thinking run the wood stove when I am around and use kerosene when I'm not. I found propane to be a little inefficient compared to the kerosene heater. Would a stove work? I thought I might pipe it out one of the endwalls through some sort of material that won't mind heat or catch fire. (Not greenhouse film)
I know you say you are are trying to heat a greenhouse but id personaally be darn careful using anything not rated for indoor use. Ive had carbon monoxide poisoning one time and between the puking and horrible headache, it was a cheap lesson. That was 25 years ago but ive never forgotten. The crazy thing was the heater that caused it was installed properly but the wind was coming from just the right direction that it pushed the exhaust back in the building. By the time i realized something was wrong, it was too late. That was before purge fans, sail switches, and proof switches. Lesson learned. I even have a sunflower heater that i will not use without ventilation. :hi:
 

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Do you have a photo or give a representative photo of the stove? It will just help us give you a better answer. :usa
 

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I looked into this same stove a couple of years ago to use in my unheated detached garage sized shop, but the stove it turned out to be way smaller than the picture led me to believe. For a 10x20 structure like your greenhouse the reviews indicate that it would be fine.

As small as it is, I have to think that it would need very frequent attention to keep it supplied with wood. If you like to sit and read in the greenhouse, or spend a lot of time planting, grafting, and potting then it might work well for you.
 

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A lot of people said they used them in small she'd or wall tents. I figured those were building close to my greenhouse that is not technically air tight.
I thought you were talking dinasour fuel of some sort. Carry on. :hi:
 

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I found this little camp stove online for $100. Been looking for a way to heat a 10x20 greenhouse for the winter. I used a kerosene heater last year but that got a bit expensive. So I was thinking run the wood stove when I am around and use kerosene when I'm not. I found propane to be a little inefficient compared to the kerosene heater. Would a stove work? I thought I might pipe it out one of the endwalls through some sort of material that won't mind heat or catch fire. (Not greenhouse film)
What kind of heat are you using in the rest of the house?
If you have a boiler of some kind. You could be able to add a zone/loop. Then you wouldn't risk running out of oxygen inside the space.
Another thought would be a self feeding pellet or coal stove. Most can be direct vented through a wall. Also requires less babysitting.
Just be sure to use double wall stove pipe and insulate it correctly.
We have been doing HVAC work on a house that caught fire just before last Xmas. The people are just now starting to move back in. A "buddy" installed a fire place kit wrong! The surrounding wood got to hot and lit. Now there insurance company is taking him to court.
 

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What kind of heat are you using in the rest of the house?
If you have a boiler of some kind. You could be able to add a zone/loop. Then you wouldn't risk running out of oxygen inside the space.
Another thought would be a self feeding pellet or coal stove. Most can be direct vented through a wall. Also requires less babysitting.
Just be sure to use double wall stove pipe and insulate it correctly.
We have been doing HVAC work on a house that caught fire just before last Xmas. The people are just now starting to move back in. A "buddy" installed a fire place kit wrong! The surrounding wood got to hot and lit. Now there insurance company is taking him to court.
Insurance taking him to court is some scary stuff!! :scared: :hide2:
 

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Insurance taking him to court is some scary stuff!! :scared: :hide2:
The manufacturer puts combustable clearance ratings on everything and the numbers are minimum. Different stack material has different ratings and fudging those numbers will certainlly end in disaster. I went to look at a home a few years back to do an estimate on a remodel and met the guy in his garage. It was mid February and snowing and cold. We walked through his nice warm garage and i see a woodburner in the back corner. I habitually follow the black stack up and saw it running directly through the OSB cut right up to the stack. I stopped instantly and asked the guy how much he liked his garage. I got a blank stare followed by, "uh, waddya mean." Turns out him and his buddy had "just" put it in. I explained the mistakes, that i could see, made my notes for the the estimate and went on my way. I never got a call back so he was either pissed at me for saying something or, god forbid, his house caught fire. I always hoped he got it fixed pissed or not. I made a comment, in another thread, about us being our own worse enemies. This is another shining example that could very easily turn tragic in an instant.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The house and shop are all heated with wood. This building is temporary and was heated with kerosene last winter. The kerosene was more efficient than propane but still expensive. When I finish the full size greenhouse (20x56), it will have wood heat but over the course of a year or two be phased out and switched to hot water. Our furnace in the shop has the ability to be hydronic and the large greenhouse is bolted right to the shop. This small one, it's out in the field behind the shop.
 
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