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Not sure of the year, but its a five speed manual. My friend is doing some work about an hour away, and she has a Chevy Colorado. We've towed the tractor WITHOUT fel and backhoe with my dad's 2014 wrangler with the v6, but I'm afraid this little truck just wont have the gumption for this..
 

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Not sure of the year, but its a five speed manual. My friend is doing some work about an hour away, and she has a Chevy Colorado. We've towed the tractor WITHOUT fel and backhoe with my dad's 2014 wrangler with the v6, but I'm afraid this little truck just wont have the gumption for this..
What does the owners manual say? It should have a tow rating clearly listed.

I'd estimate maybe 2500lb for 1025R FEL/backhoe + weight of the trailer.

Going back to 2005 shows a tow rating of 3100-3500lb depending on how it is equipped - I'm sure later years probably improved the tow rating to remain competitive with other players in the market.
 

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If that Colorado has the 5 cylinder motor, I'd say no. I think these trucks max out a 5000 lbs towing. You will be pushing the envelope with the combined weight of the trailer and tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What does the owners manual say? It should have a tow rating clearly listed.

I'd estimate maybe 2500lb for 1025R FEL/backhoe + weight of the trailer.

Going back to 2005 shows a tow rating of 3100-3500lb depending on how it is equipped - I'm sure later years probably improved the tow rating to remain competitive with other players in the market.
I haven't checked -- the truck has been parked in her garage for a while, since she normally drives a Subaru, and is her ex-husband's, I'm just trying to figure out how to get it there if we decide we do need it..
 

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If that Colorado has the 5 cylinder motor, I'd say no. I think these trucks max out a 5000 lbs towing. You will be pushing the envelope with the combined weight of the trailer and tractor.
The shipping weight of the 1025r is 1333lb, h120 is 541, 260a is 600. So all together, that's about 2500lb. I doubt the trailer weights 1.25 tons..
 

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The maximum towing capacity for the Colorado is 7,000 lbs but that's a 4x2 model WITH the towing package, a 3.6L V6 engine and an automatic transmission. The 2.4L 4-cyl, 4x2 with manual transmission models have a rated towing capacity of 3,500 lbs. Other configurations fall in between those two numbers.
 

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Next question is bumper pull or receiver hitch?

Properly balancing the load and keeping the tongue weight within hitch spec's will be difficult.

Other problem is stopping it.

I'd suggest finding someone with a full size half ton and good trailer at a minimum.
 
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The shipping weight of the 1025r is 1333lb, h120 is 541, 260a is 600. So all together, that's about 2500lb. I doubt the trailer weights 1.25 tons..
The U-Haul trailer I rented to bring my 1025R FILB from PA to TN weighed in at 2800#. I have an F150 5.4l V8 (9000 lb towing capacity) and had some trouble keeping it up to highway speeds going through VA on I-80.
 

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The U-Haul trailer I rented to bring my 1025R FILB from PA to TN weighed in at 2800#. I have an F150 5.4l V8 (9000 lb towing capacity) and had some trouble keeping it up to highway speeds going through VA on I-80.
The trailers that U-Haul rents are absolute tanks. I owned an Anderson 18' equipment trailer, 10k rating, that weight in excess of 2500 lbs. Similarly rated trailers from many other companies weigh around 2000 lbs. If this is a 7k trailer, it could be in the 1500-1700 lb range and could, conceivably work.

In order to know for sure, details about the truck are necessary - The easiest thing to do is look up the configuration and equipment style of the truck in the manual and get the rating. The next best thing would be to get the year, specific style (4x4, standard cab, etc.) and look it up on line. Whether it has the tow package or not is largely going to only matter in terms of what the final gearing is. A bolt-on hitch is more than capable of handling at least the weight rating it would have from the factory, but it may not have the necessary "oomph" if it isn't geared tall enough to tow 4000-5000 lbs.
 
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You can do it!

Weight-wise, you'll feel it, but you should be fine if you drive sensibly. Try not to slip the clutch too much. I pull a pair of jet skis and a loaded horse trailer occasionally with my wife's 2011 Colorado (5 cyl., 4x4, 4dr) A little weight on the back helps, so I'd try to position your 1025 so as to apply about 15 to 20% tongue weight, but no more than what it's rated for, which should be between 350 and 500 lbs, depending on your model.

EDIT: You'll want trailer brakes!
 
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Tow rating for her truck should be on the sticker just inside the driver's door located on the door jam.
 

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The U-Haul trailer I rented to bring my 1025R FILB from PA to TN weighed in at 2800#. I have an F150 5.4l V8 (9000 lb towing capacity) and had some trouble keeping it up to highway speeds going through VA on I-80.
This is the point I was going to make. Maybe it will pull it fine. With proper trailer brakes and controller it should stop fine. But what about sway? You can say that "I will just drive sensibly" but that doesn't take into account any emergency maneuvers that might be needed out there - or just plain wind.
 

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Aren't most larger U-Haul trailers equipped with hydraulic brakes? I so dislike hydraulic surge trailer brake actuators.
 
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Aren't most larger U-Haul trailers equipped with hydraulic brakes? I so dislike hydraulic surge trailer brake actuators.
I believe it most trailers in general from them have them. In order to ensure the biggest overall target "audience" to rent to, they can't rely on even vehicles with a 7-wire harness to have a brake controller. So, surge brakes it is.

They aren't great (they're the worst performers of the various types), but they work.
 

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I'm making a little bit of an assumption here, but 5 speed may mean 4 cylinder. That's not going to be a great "tow" package. My 1026R with tiller on an Aluma single axle trailer gives my Silverado 1500 with the 5.3 a decent workout in the hills. I've got 4.11 gears too. Just for reference.

You might also want to check the tires out on the truck. Are they still "LT" tires? Lots of people just throw cheapies on them and that could be an issue with that amount of weight.

-636
 

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I'm making a little bit of an assumption here, but 5 speed may mean 4 cylinder. That's not going to be a great "tow" package. My 1026R with tiller on an Aluma single axle trailer gives my Silverado 1500 with the 5.3 a decent workout in the hills. I've got 4.11 gears too. Just for reference.

You might also want to check the tires out on the truck. Are they still "LT" tires? Lots of people just throw cheapies on them and that could be an issue with that amount of weight.

-636
Sounds like it's a generation or two ago, back when the 5.3 was only making about 2/3 of the power it does now. Newer trucks also have the six-speed transmission with Tow/Haul mode to raise the shift points. The current 1500 with 5.3L and 3.42 gears is rated to tow up to about 9500 in 4x4 configuration.
 

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I think mine has 295hp. It's an '03 so it has mechanical fan. Mine is a 4 speed with tow/haul. It does a good job pulling, but I can tell my setup is back there. I can't imagine pulling with a 4 cylinder Colorado. I drive an '08 RCSB Colorado with the inline 5 for work. It does fine with a topper, but there isn't a ton of power to spare. That's why I'd use caution if you do end up pulling a similar setup.

-636
 

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I think mine has 295hp. It's an '03 so it has mechanical fan. Mine is a 4 speed with tow/haul. It does a good job pulling, but I can tell my setup is back there. I can't imagine pulling with a 4 cylinder Colorado. I drive an '08 RCSB Colorado with the inline 5 for work. It does fine with a topper, but there isn't a ton of power to spare. That's why I'd use caution if you do end up pulling a similar setup.

-636
Makes sense... The new ones are 355HP/383ftlb w/ 6-speed. What i was sort of getting at in my last post is that it's important to understand what that specific Colorado is rated at since they've made some significant gains in the last five years or so in terms of the payload they can carry and the towing weights they can pull.
 

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MY answer:
Can the truck do it: yes, if you aren't in a hurry and take extra safety precautions, the truck should survive. Before I had my M, I was hauling around a Model G (nearly 6000 pounds of machine on a 10k gwr trailer) with the F150 in my signature... A truck which 30 years and half-a-million miles ago only had 125 horsepower. I don't think I was ever able to go faster than about 45mph and by the time I got to the top of most hills, I was down in second gear with a line of cars behind me. We made a lot of "shall I get out and push" jokes. Being young and stupid has its advantages! :lol:

THE LOGICAL answer:
Should you do it with that truck: not if you have a better option. A lot of people, admittedly myself included, often have trouble finding the line between "can" and "should". Manufacturers are required by the DOT to come up with towing/hauling weights, but until recently the test to determine those numbers was arbitrary and not standard between manufacturers or even within companies. Thus, it is a number that can be questioned to a certain degree, but you still have to operate within the bounds of reason as well as the physical laws of nature. Depending on conditions, I would argue that towing/hauling ratings can technically be bent by about 5 to 15%. Even in a newer vehicle, there are going to be massive differences in towing performance between a level road at sea level and climbing the continental divide in the Rockies. A lot too boils down to driver comfort and experiance; never operate a vehicle outside of your own comfort bubble regardless of what a sticker on the door frame says!

THE LAWIER'S answer:
If the police/DOT catch you pulling a TLB on a two axle trailer with a mini-truck, they will stop you, weigh your rig on one of their mobile scales, and compare that number to the number on the door. They will take that number as the gospel truth. If the rig is overweight, they will ticket you and not let you go until a more suitable tow vehicle is found. Another thing to consider is the liability of an accident while overloaded. It may be very difficult to convince a judge of your innocence when you were knowingly breaking the law in the first place, even if an accident wasn't your fault. All it takes is one idiot pulling out in front of you and suddenly you and your overweight truck are to blame regardless of the fact that you still would have clobbered them had you been driving without any trailer at all.


In short, this question is a slippery slope. I would advise the original poster to take ALL advice on this subject with a certain degree of skepticism. Remember, you asked "can the truck do it" which is a different question than "should I do it".

Further, I would like to point out to those giving the advice that they should also observe a certain degree of caution. There are so many more factors at play than just power and gearing; the size and condition of the brakes, load distribution on the trailer, weather, traffic, terrain, hitch capacity, ball capacity, tire condition, and driver experience all are major factors as well. Most of these factors are unknown to you. A steep hill, bald tires, bad weather, and a Walmart hitch rated for 3500 pounds are a bad combination even if the tow vehicle is a brand new 1-ton Duramax diesel.
 
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