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Discussion Starter #1
I want to make a floor for my ShelterLogic garage tent to keep the moisture away from the tractor's frame. A cheap and easy solution is to put down pallets and cover them with plywood. Do you guys think that can support the tractor with its various attachments?
 

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That’s tough without doing the math.

3/4” plywood - I would try it myself. I know exactly what you want to do and I hope something works. Nothing worse than parking on dirt.

I remember when we lived at our old place - in the spring mud season we had to park our vehicles on planks or they would be frozen in the mud every morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have stones down now...1" curshed or something around there. No mud, but when it rains, they get wet. Maybe water underneath condensing on the cold rocks above.
 

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I have stones down now...1" curshed or something around there. No mud, but when it rains, they get wet. Maybe water underneath condensing on the cold rocks above.
In my opinion there is always moisture coming out of ground - gravel or not. Plus the fact now your shelter is capturing it.

Have you thought of or tried a tarp? Not a very elegant solution but it may help and it’s cheap enough.....
 

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First, put plastic down under the pallets.

If the middle rail of the pallets is directly under the wheels then you will have no problem.

If the wheels end up half way between the rails of the pallets then I think you would need to have them covered with 3/4 plywood - not OSB. If the wheels are over the rails then 1/2 ply or OSB would probably be okay.

Also, depends upon the pallets. Sturdiness of pallets varies greatly. If you were to use those blue pallets (forget what they are called) then you wouldn't need to use any plywood over them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks! I'll give that a shot.

I also have a big shed, traditional construction. I plan to clear it out this summer. How can I tell if its floor can support the tractor? It's one thing if I crack some pallets, another if I break my shed.
 

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Thanks! I'll give that a shot.

I also have a big shed, traditional construction. I plan to clear it out this summer. How can I tell if its floor can support the tractor? It's one thing if I crack some pallets, another if I break my shed.
Hard to say unless we know how the floor is constructed.
 

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I also have a big shed, traditional construction. I plan to clear it out this summer. How can I tell if its floor can support the tractor? It's one thing if I crack some pallets, another if I break my shed.
No way to know that without looking under your shed. If it's typical shed construction, they built a platform using 2x6s, 16" on center and covered it with 3/4" PT plywood. That may either be set directly on the ground, on piers or they may have run 3 or 4 4x4s underneath and set it down on those.

If that's what they did, you'd probably be fine just laying down another layer of 3/4" plywood to disperse the load around. If the floor joists are perpendicular to your tractor, you could possibly lay down 2x12s and drive the tractor on top of those too. I just don't like doing that because I'm kind of a klutz and it leaves me something to trip over. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hard to say unless we know how the floor is constructed.
You mean like joist spacing? I can go measure that later, if I can figure out how to look under it. But I assume it's standard/meets code for sheds, whatever that is.

How do you generally tell if your shed floor can support your tractor? Just drive in and hope for the best? :p
 

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I think you really have to take a close look at how your shed was constructed. Can you see lines of nail heads in the floor? that might tell you how far apart your joists are spaced...

If it's a simple frame of 2x4's or 2x6's with 5/8" plywood on top and the joists are ONLY supported at the ends (no support in the center)... it's kind of iffy...

like this...
4-Floor-sheet-nailing.jpg


But, if there are several 4x4 or 4x6 stringers running the long way, with 2x6 or 2x4 joists spaced every 12" or 16", topped with 2 layers of 3/4" plywood.... Then that's different...

OK.....

shed-floor-joists.jpg

Better......

shed-kit-reassembling-floor.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's a large shed, 20'x30, and it appears to have stringers. So I guess it will do fine. Thanks!
 

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It's a large shed, 20'x30, and it appears to have stringers. So I guess it will do fine. Thanks!
Please make sure, it may work when you drive in but by tomorrow or a few days it may be a different story! The shelter logic thing with skids will work if the skids are built well, made of Oak and not pine and like someone said make sure where your tires will be is where the skid supports are and then cover with 3/4 plywood not OSB or use 3/4" Advantech, at least the Advantech is somewhat water resistant and much sturdier than just plain old OSB.. Make sure the skids are on solid ground too or you will be wasting your money for nothing. One more thing to do, go to church first! :lol:
 

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I want to make a floor for my ShelterLogic garage tent to keep the moisture away from the tractor's frame. A cheap and easy solution is to put down pallets and cover them with plywood. Do you guys think that can support the tractor with its various attachments?
Remember, it all comes down to PSI. Your 1025R only weighs around 2100 lbs with the loader. A proper ballast is going to be 600+ lbs. Do you really need to store the ballast on the wooden floor? It could easily be left outside.

The hardest part is going to be finding sturdy pallets that have the exact same dimensions and then getting them perfectly level so the floor doesn't have any sags.

Have you considered building the floor in the same manor as portable sheds? You could put down rows of treated 4x4's and lay the plywood on them. You could even attach them on the ends for rigidity.

Overall other than the ballast box I don't think your implements or tractor pose any real PSI issue. If you really want to put the ballast box inside you can also lay an additional 3/4" plywood section under it to spread out the load. That's what I do in my 16x32 wooden floor shed.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Have you considered building the floor in the same manor as portable sheds? You could put down rows of treated 4x4's and lay the plywood on them. You could even attach them on the ends for rigidity.
This is the best idea I've yet heard. Thanks! I'm going to do this.

What should the spacing be?
 

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This is the best idea I've yet heard. Thanks! I'm going to do this.

What should the spacing be?
My single car unit has 12" spacing on the floor joists with 3/4" floor and is rated for 430 lbs per square foot. I'm sure some folks will chime in with some more specific measurements. Since you are building your own floor you can use as many 4x4's as you like and orient them in a way which will give the most support. With a 3/4" floor and closely spaced 4x4s you should be able to park a tractor trailer in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My single car unit has 12" spacing on the floor joists with 3/4" floor and is rated for 430 lbs per square foot. I'm sure some folks will chime in with some more specific measurements. Since you are building your own floor you can use as many 4x4's as you like and orient them in a way which will give the most support. With a 3/4" floor and closely spaced 4x4s you should be able to park a tractor trailer in there.
Do you think I can use pressure treated 2x4s? My shelter is on a slope and I didn't quite level it with the rocks. I was thinking of 2x4s in the front transitioning to 4x4s towards the back. That would save quite a lot of money too, as 2x4s are 1/3rd the price.
 

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Do you think I can use pressure treated 2x4s? My shelter is on a slope and I didn't quite level it with the rocks. I was thinking of 2x4s in the front transitioning to 4x4s towards the back. That would save quite a lot of money too, as 2x4s are 1/3rd the price.
Maybe you can screw two 2x4 together? 4x4 are nice because they are naturally quite stable. I've never seen any large portable sheds or garages that used 2x4.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Maybe you can screw two 2x4 together? 4x4 are nice because they are naturally quite stable. I've never seen any large portable sheds or garages that used 2x4.
I was thinking of laying them down flat. As I mentioned, my shed floor is sloped. If I use all 4x4s I will either have to bury the first few or the floor won't be level, and I'll need little ramps for the front. If I use treated 2x4s lying flat in the front and a few 4x4s in the back, I can have a level floor.
 

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I was thinking of laying them down flat. As I mentioned, my shed floor is sloped. If I use all 4x4s I will either have to bury the first few or the floor won't be level, and I'll need little ramps for the front. If I use treated 2x4s lying flat in the front and a few 4x4s in the back, I can have a level floor.
The one issue I can think of with 2x4 laying flat is they have very little strength and will easily bow when any weight is applied.
 

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For a long term solution I suggest getting the stone level first, bring in more stone if needed.

Then use the pressure treated 4 x 4's on 12" centers and use 3/4" Advantech for the flooring.
 
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