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While putting mulch out around my Mom's house in central Indiana, I tangled with this bush and it put me in the hospital with an allergic reaction of epic proportions. My mom called it a mock cedar, but that isn't turning up much when I search for it. I'd really like to know what it is, so that I can avoid it in the future.

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I don't have a clue what it is, but I'm glad to hear you're ok. :thumbup1gif:
 

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It looks like every cedar shrub I've ever seen.


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Sorry no help! ,but glad you're doing OK
 

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Whatever it is I think it's time for it to go.
You think? :mocking:


I'll bet that sucker is either long gone or at least on the short list. :nunu:
 

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While putting mulch out around my Mom's house in central Indiana, I tangled with this bush and it put me in the hospital with an allergic reaction of epic proportions. My mom called it a mock cedar, but that isn't turning up much when I search for it. I'd really like to know what it is, so that I can avoid it in the future.

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Looks like a dwarf pyramid arborvitae? We had a few of those and I too would itch like crazy if scratched. They are no longer living in my yard.. JT
 

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Do you know with certainty any items that you're allergic to? If not, you may want to get tested.

As far as what it is, why not take a couple of pictures and some branch samples in to a local landscape company / arborist? Well, not YOU, per se... Maybe get someone to take them for you? :)
 

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Arborvitae

Yep that's an arborvitae or thuja. There are hundreds of cultivars of it out there some growing as tall as 200 ft. They are extremely common as ornamental shrubs and hedges.

It is often called "Whitecedar" or "Redcedar" but they are not true cedars.

The foliage can give off an irritant oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the replies, it's good to know what they are. They are in Mom's yard. I won't be coming in contact with them again. Next time mulch needs to be done, my banker brother will actually have to help. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Thanks for the replies, it's good to know what they are. They are in Mom's yard. I won't be coming in contact with them again. Next time mulch needs to be done, my banker brother will actually have to help. :thumbup1gif:
That's what brothers are for,, hopefully he does not have a reaction.. Wear gloves and long sleeve shirts and don't rub your eyes.. These things (like junipers) affect other shrubs and trees too. Read up on what they can spread to fruit trees or ornamental trees like flowering crabs. Spores blow in the wind and infect others in a negative way.. I was loosing leaves right after the blossoms on my flowering crabs and couldn't figure it out until an arborist told me to get rid of the arborvitaes.. he was right.. hornets love them too, nice and thick to make hives.. Can't tell you how many times I was stung just walking by.. They have one heck of a root system too, very tough to pull out if they are old.. Good luck Bubber
 

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Yep that's an arborvitae or thuja. There are hundreds of cultivars of it out there some growing as tall as 200 ft. They are extremely common as ornamental shrubs and hedges.

It is often called "Whitecedar" or "Redcedar" but they are not true cedars.

The foliage can give off an irritant oil.
And the oil is highly flammable. IMO they should never be planted close to a house as they go up like you poured a can of gasoline on them when dead/dry. :nunu: Never tried when they're green like yours, but who wants to try that?? :laugh:
 

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I've never seen anything like it. Glad there are none around here. They would have to go. With their being oil in/on them it could oil the chipper in places I can't get to. :bigthumb:
 

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Yep that's an arborvitae or thuja. There are hundreds of cultivars of it out there some growing as tall as 200 ft. They are extremely common as ornamental shrubs and hedges.

It is often called "Whitecedar" or "Redcedar" but they are not true cedars.

The foliage can give off an irritant oil.
I can't see the 'green parts' well enough, but they do not like an Arborvitae (which is in the Cypress family).
 

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I can't see the 'green parts' well enough, but they do not like an Arborvitae (which is in the Cypress family).
It is difficult to tell from the photo like you said. There is abundant new growth on the tree which makes it even more difficult as the foliage shapes of many evergreens "loosen" as they grow and make identification easier further into the growing season. Also for some reason the second picture didn't load when I looked at the thread earlier :lol:

I classified it largely upon the location, the Arborvitae is actually native to that area, commonality of cultivars used in landscaping in that area, and on the dead foliage under the greenery in the tree photo.

It very well may not be an Arborvitae cultivar. It could be an Eastern Red-cedar (Juniperus virginiana) or one of a number of other evergreens.

a sharper close up shot of a small group of foliage would make a definitive answer more likely to obtain.
 

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It is difficult to tell from the photo like you said. There is abundant new growth on the tree which makes it even more difficult as the foliage shapes of many evergreens "loosen" as they grow and make identification easier further into the growing season. Also for some reason the second picture didn't load when I looked at the thread earlier :lol:

I classified it largely upon the location, the Arborvitae is actually native to that area, commonality of cultivars used in landscaping in that area, and on the dead foliage under the greenery in the tree photo.

It very well may not be an Arborvitae cultivar. It could be an Eastern Red-cedar (Juniperus virginiana) or one of a number of other evergreens.

a sharper close up shot of a small group of foliage would make a definitive answer more likely to obtain.
Something in the Juniper family would seem reasonable as the foliage appears to be more "bristly" than flat, and the Arborvitae is very flat. I have about 40-50 of them ringing a very large chunk of my yard, standing 25' tall or more each (I'm in CT, they are pretty abundant around here although I have no idea if they are a truly native shrub or not)... The basic shape of the shrub seems to match, but the apparent needle-like texture to the foliage (pic 2) is what made me say "Nah".
 

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