Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My Dodge Ram 1500 has 215,000 miles on the engine. These days is sees very little use, maybe 2,000 miles a year if that. It does burn oil but not too bad. I recently put in a quart of Shell Rotella 15W40 diesel oil & noticed it burns less over 500 miles use. I'm thinking of using 15W40 on my next oil change with also a quart or so of Lucas oil mixed in. I don't think I will do any harm on an engine with 215 K on it. The truck is currently used for lumber & material pick up at the local lumber yard only five miles away & sometimes it make a 30 mile round trip into town. Average monthly use is less than 200 miles a month. It's an eight cylinder engine & I think the original oil spec is for 5W20(?). Thanks for the advice / opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Given your location and the miles on the engine I wouldn't worry about using that oil- and if it stops consumption/burning all the better.

You'll not experience any cold starts down south so you won't be working the engine on super thick cold oil and there are lots of folks who subscribe to the notion of going up a thickness grade in a motor to try and stop oil use out there.

Bottom line, at that mileage in your truck-do as you think is best. I don't think you'll cause any harm.

Added: original spec was likely 10w or 5w30, I had an '01 with the 5.9l.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,228 Posts
My Dodge Ram 1500 has 215,000 miles on the engine. These days is sees very little use, maybe 2,000 miles a year if that. It does burn oil but not too bad. I recently put in a quart of Shell Rotella 15W40 diesel oil & noticed it burns less over 500 miles use. I'm thinking of using 15W40 on my next oil change with also a quart or so of Lucas oil mixed in. I don't think I will do any harm on an engine with 215 K on it. The truck is currently used for lumber & material pick up at the local lumber yard only five miles away & sometimes it make a 30 mile round trip into town. Average monthly use is less than 200 miles a month. It's an eight cylinder engine & I think the original oil spec is for 5W20(?). Thanks for the advice / opinion.

Yes. It would probably work better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
I've never used Rotella T6 in my cars or trucks, but I've used it in my motorcycles for years. I started using it in an '03 Goldwing, used it in an '06 FJR and still use it in my '09 Zx14. I've used it those bikes since their first oil change. The Zx14 has over 52,000 miles on it and it uses no oil. It's very popular with motorcyclists! The label on the blue bottle says it meets JASO MA specs, same as most motorcycle specific oils, without the clutch slip causing "friction modifiers".

So, yes, it's safe to use Rotella in a gas engine... A little more $$ than conventional oil but great protection
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Given your location and the miles on the engine I wouldn't worry about using that oil- and if it stops consumption/burning all the better.

You'll not experience any cold starts down south so you won't be working the engine on super thick cold oil and there are lots of folks who subscribe to the notion of going up a thickness grade in a motor to try and stop oil use out there.

Bottom line, at that mileage in your truck-do as you think is best. I don't think you'll cause any harm.

Added: original spec was likely 10w or 5w30, I had an '01 with the 5.9l.
Thanks- That's exactly what I was thinking. Operating temps here in the south are on the warm to hot side. Overnight winter temp could drop as low as 20f, but by 10 a.m. it could reach 40 plus. And the truck is never on the road until late mornings if at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,965 Posts
My Dodge Ram 1500 has 215,000 miles on the engine. These days is sees very little use, maybe 2,000 miles a year if that. It does burn oil but not too bad. I recently put in a quart of Shell Rotella 15W40 diesel oil & noticed it burns less over 500 miles use. I'm thinking of using 15W40 on my next oil change with also a quart or so of Lucas oil mixed in. I don't think I will do any harm on an engine with 215 K on it. The truck is currently used for lumber & material pick up at the local lumber yard only five miles away & sometimes it make a 30 mile round trip into town. Average monthly use is less than 200 miles a month. It's an eight cylinder engine & I think the original oil spec is for 5W20(?). Thanks for the advice / opinion.
Hey Maddog,

There is a difference between "burning oil" and "oil consumption". Engines that "use oil", that is, require make up oil to be added between changes may not be "burning oil" in the traditional sense, for example loss of oil control by the rings or the guides resulting in blue smoke out the exhaust, but they be consuming oil because of the oil itself is boiling out it's volatile components and the PVC system is pulling them away to be burnt in the combustion chambers. Different quality/brands of oil have different volatility specs, generally the higher the price, the less it tends to evaporate in use as the less expensive brands include volatile components in order to achieve the lower viscosity rating, as these boil away, the oil thickens and falls out of the listed viscosity range. Synthetics for the most part have almost no volatile components and are considered viscosity stable over the service life of the oil.

Now I'm not saying that an engine with 225K on it may not be using oil, but before you go putting a 15w-40 in an engine designed for 5-30 or 10w-30 you may want to try a higher quality brand or one of the "high mileage" type oil of the recommended viscosity and see if you get less oil consumption.

I'm reluctant to recommend a higher viscosity oil to lessen consumption as that can have negative aspects in the engine such as reduced MPG, less splash lubrication of components, less flow for cooling components, slower delivery to components on cold start etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
yes its far better then any car only rated oil. more zinc,much stronger additive pack ect. look on the back of the bottle should show rated for road tractors (semi's) construction, and cars/pick up truck gas engines.. look on bottle of car oil and its not rated for diesels.. diesel oil is rated for gas and diesel engines

diesels have way more cylinder pressure and normally a turbo to oil .. a diesel still has pistons,valves,lifters,camshaft,crankshaft,rod,cam bearings ect
the diesel oil cleans very well and breaks down those particals to tiny microns and suspense them in the oil.. in a real diesel soot is why the oil turns black diesel rated oil takes that soot and breaks it down and keeps it from hurting the engine....

put car only rated oil in a diesel and the soot may clump up and become harmful in the engine.

bottom line yes its way better.. you can get rottella in a 10w30 weight if your worried about the 40wt being to thick (its not)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,736 Posts
As mentioned there is nothing in Diesel Engine oil that can't be used in a gas engine.

I also use it (T6) in a lot of motorcycles. They also make a T5 oil which you can get in a weight closer to what your truck calls for like a 10w-30.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,143 Posts
Our daughters FIL used 15w40 in his JDx590 for thinking 11 or 12 yrs and now JDx738 . Only difference it was JD brand oil instead of Rotella.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
Is this a magnum engine, the 4.7 or a hemi? If it's a magnum (5.2 or 5.9) Rotella usage wouldn't be an issue. On the other 2 newer style engines you might want to talk to a Dodge experienced mechanic or do a bit of Googling. The newer engines have higher tech stuff like cam phasers...and oil viscosity may be a concern.

That said, I buy Shell Rotella by the 5 gal bucket and run it in my 6.7 Cummins, two KTM dirt bikes, a Yamaha Stratoliner and my 1025R. I won't run it in my 2.5 Subaru, where 0w20 is recommended.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hey Maddog,

There is a difference between "burning oil" and "oil consumption". Engines that "use oil", that is, require make up oil to be added between changes may not be "burning oil" in the traditional sense, for example loss of oil control by the rings or the guides resulting in blue smoke out the exhaust, but they be consuming oil because of the oil itself is boiling out it's volatile components and the PVC system is pulling them away to be burnt in the combustion chambers. Different quality/brands of oil have different volatility specs, generally the higher the price, the less it tends to evaporate in use as the less expensive brands include volatile components in order to achieve the lower viscosity rating, as these boil away, the oil thickens and falls out of the listed viscosity range. Synthetics for the most part have almost no volatile components and are considered viscosity stable over the service life of the oil.

Now I'm not saying that an engine with 225K on it may not be using oil, but before you go putting a 15w-40 in an engine designed for 5-30 or 10w-30 you may want to try a higher quality brand or one of the "high mileage" type oil of the recommended viscosity and see if you get less oil consumption.

I'm reluctant to recommend a higher viscosity oil to lessen consumption as that can have negative aspects in the engine such as reduced MPG, less splash lubrication of components, less flow for cooling components, slower delivery to components on cold start etc.
Very interesting comment. However I believe that I'm "burning some oil". I don't buy Any lubricants based on price. I have always used high quality products. But beyond a brand name how do you determine "Quality". The only way the average customer can determine quality regardless of price is by the API ratings & certifications found on the package along with the warranty & claims made by the manufacturer. I don't think price enters into it at all or very little. I never use Re Refined or recycled oils at all.

I'm not sure Syn oils will do me any good in a 215K engine. But I have had success with High mileage oils (Penzoil) in another vehicle I had. It stopped a seal leak at a main bearing & the performance of the oil was great. Maybe I will try a high mileage oil & see if it does work better. But if not I will go to the 15W40. I see no harm in using that oil & I really don't care about any lost MPG, performance, etc. The engine has 215k on it and this truck has now become a light duty truck for me. I can't even put 500 miles a month on the engine. Thanks for your advice & opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Very interesting comment. However I believe that I'm "burning some oil". I don't buy Any lubricants based on price. I have always used high quality products. But beyond a brand name how do you determine "Quality". The only way the average customer can determine quality regardless of price is by the API ratings & certifications found on the package along with the warranty & claims made by the manufacturer. I don't think price enters into it at all or very little. I never use Re Refined or recycled oils at all.

I'm not sure Syn oils will do me any good in a 215K engine. But I have had success with High mileage oils (Penzoil) in another vehicle I had. It stopped a seal leak at a main bearing & the performance of the oil was great. Maybe I will try a high mileage oil & see if it does work better. But if not I will go to the 15W40. I see no harm in using that oil & I really don't care about any lost MPG, performance, etc. The engine has 215k on it and this truck has now become a light duty truck for me. I can't even put 500 miles a month on the engine. Thanks for your advice & opinion.
valvoine now makes a 15w40 diesel high mileage oil. got some at walmart price wasnt that bad:bigthumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
i took some pics of the bottle its a semi syn..... i think it was like 15$ a gallon:bigthumb:
SN spec on the back of the jug is for gas engines SN is the latest API spec for gas engines
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
i took some pics of the bottle its a semi syn..... i think it was like 15$ a gallon:bigthumb:
SN spec on the back of the jug is for gas engines SN is the latest API spec for gas engines
I was just in Wal Mart yesterday. I did not buy any oil but I was looking. I did see Valvoline High Mileage there but did not catch the "Diesel" on the label. I will have to look again. I think this is an oil I might try over the Shell 15-40. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
I was just in Wal Mart yesterday. I did not buy any oil but I was looking. I did see Valvoline High Mileage there but did not catch the "Diesel" on the label. I will have to look again. I think this is an oil I might try over the Shell 15-40. Thanks[/Q


it might not be at your local store. first time i seen it at my local walmart

but you can go here

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Valvoline-Heavy-Duty-with-MaxLife-Technology-High-Mileage-15W-40-Motor-Oil-1-Gallon/49660457?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&adid=22222222227037596028&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=80419490809&wl4=pla-177646306129&wl5=9022943&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=49660457&wl13=&veh=sem
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I have been around engines all my life up to about 2000hp Cat diesels and the main issue that I see using diesel grade oil in an older petrol engine is that the higher detergent level in the oil will start cleaning up the sludge & gunk and could block the filter prematurely, causing the filter bypass valve to open and allow unfiltered oil to circulate around the engine. My advice would be to shorten the oil & filter change interval for the first couple of changes to get the engine cleaned up. Alternatively, a flushing oil could be used prior to change-over.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,046 Posts
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top