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Discussion Starter #1
Evening folks,

Have a question ... I just finished clearing the driveway of about 11" of wet snow. I got so frustrated with the 47" blower, that I ended using the back blade. The issue I am having is in wet heavy snow, every time I finish a pass, and go to backup and lift the blower, the chute clogs every time. Have tried spraying with WD40 and Sno Jet and works better for awhile but then starts doing it all over again. I don't have a problem using the back blade, and once I get the package from R2 I will use the FEL. Any thoughts or recommendations would be welcome. :banghead:
 

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Wet snow is tough. I usually use a blade instead. But have ok luck taking smaller passes. Especially that deep. Try taking a 1/2 pass and see how it goes. May just be the volume you are trying to get through it. But slushy snow is tough. Get a blade for the front as a snow removal option and save your neck!


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Something doesn't sound right. I have the 54" blower which is the same mechanism in a 7" wider housing and I have never had a clog... ever... regardless of how wet the snow is, how big of a bite I take, or how fast or slow I go.

Questions:

1. What tractor are you using?
2. Are you running your engine at the rated PTO RPM? (It is marked on your tach and should be around 3200 RPM)
3. When you stop and before you start reversing, do you pause and let the blower clear of snow?
4. Does your tractor automatically shut off the blower when you go in reverse?
5. Is your tractor and blower stored in a heated garage?

Granted there are certain snow conditions when a back blade is more suitable for the task but your 47" blower should not be clogging that badly.
 

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Just a thought here? Does your 47SB have the plastic or steel fan blade? The cupped steel fan does a much better job throwing wet snow & slush.

I just got in from making another pass on my ~800'+ driveway. This time clearing 3-4" of sleet and snow. It was very heavy and wet but no chute clogging issues. Make sure you're running at PTO rated speed. I don't use SnoJet or any other lubricant on the auger or chute housings.
 

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My snowblower manual (54D) says to blow snow with the throttle set wide open, not at the PTO mark. I had much better performance when I did this. I also used fluid film as a lubricant on the augur, the chute, and innards of the blower chambers. I haven't had a clog since I made these 2 changes. I also modified my exhaust port so that it is not heating the blower chamber, but the clogs disappeared with just the first 2 changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Something doesn't sound right. I have the 54" blower which is the same mechanism in a 7" wider housing and I have never had a clog... ever... regardless of how wet the snow is, how big of a bite I take, or how fast or slow I go.

Questions:

1. What tractor are you using?
2. Are you running your engine at the rated PTO RPM? (It is marked on your tach and should be around 3200 RPM)
3. When you stop and before you start reversing, do you pause and let the blower clear of snow?
4. Does your tractor automatically shut off the blower when you go in reverse?
5. Is your tractor and blower stored in a heated garage?

Granted there are certain snow conditions when a back blade is more suitable for the task but your 47" blower should not be clogging that badly.
I am using 2210
Yes I run at PTO Speed
I may need to give the blower more time to clear, will give that a go
No the PTO does not auto disengage when in reverse
I do store it in the garage, but not heated (to cheap for that)
The blower never skips a beat when in dry snow, maybe I was taking to big of passes for the conditions, will try going 1/4 to 3rd in future.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just a thought here? Does your 47SB have the plastic or steel fan blade? The cupped steel fan does a much better job throwing wet snow & slush.

I just got in from making another pass on my ~800'+ driveway. This time clearing 3-4" of sleet and snow. It was very heavy and wet but no chute clogging issues. Make sure you're running at PTO rated speed. I don't use SnoJet or any other lubricant on the auger or chute housings.
The blower head was on my 425, so it is steel fan blade. and running at 3200 RPM
 

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My snowblower manual (54D) says to blow snow with the throttle set wide open, not at the PTO mark. I had much better performance when I did this. I also used fluid film as a lubricant on the augur, the chute, and innards of the blower chambers. I haven't had a clog since I made these 2 changes. I also modified my exhaust port so that it is not heating the blower chamber, but the clogs disappeared with just the first 2 changes.
Ill need to go back and look at the manual about the throttle setting, have always run at PTO speed.
 

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And perhaps go slower, let it have time to eat snow....my 47" blower did fine but I ran it at WOT for this snow...very wet and heavy.....
 

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Definitely give it time to eat before moving forward again. Especially with heavy wet snow. Even first gear was not low enough with my walk behind blower. You got to move/chew/move/chew until you get it done.

Definitely give it time to clean out before backing up or shutting it down. This will help minimize the clogging.

When done clean out any remaining snow from the housing. This is so it doesn't freeze and lock up the blower.

Of course you should never stick anything (especially you hand) inside your blower with the engine running.

Back when I was 16 a friend and I were enjoying a snow day at the mall. On the way home this guy stumbled out into the road in front of my car. My friend said stop he's bleeding! So I did. His hand was wrapped up in a bloody rag. You guessed it. Stuck his hand in a running blower. It looked like an old unit without a dead man lever. He got in and I took him to the local hospital down the road. We also left the blower running in his parking lot as we drove away. lol

The place was a small lot for his upholstery shop. So he definitely needed his hand to make a living. We finally met back up with him a few months later. His fingers actually healed up nicely without permanent damage. Not everyone is so lucky.
 

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My snowblower manual (54D) says to blow snow with the throttle set wide open, not at the PTO mark.
According to the 1025R manual, the PTO mark is 3200 RPM which also is the rated engine RPM.

It is typical for garden tractor manuals to use the term "wide open throttle" when specifying the engine speed for mowing or other PTO implements.
 

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According to the 1025R manual, the PTO mark is 3200 RPM which also is the rated engine RPM.

It is typical for garden tractor manuals to use the term "wide open throttle" when specifying the engine speed for mowing or other PTO implements.
I think the term wide open throttle is for tractors without a tachometer.
 

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I think the term wide open throttle is for tractors without a tachometer.
Actually, it appears to just be typical JD manual confusionism. :) I dug up the manual for the 54" blower and here is what it says:

Engaging Snowblower

1. Start tractor engine.
IMPORTANT: Avoid damage! Lever must be in float position to allow implement to follow ground contours.

2. Push dual SCV lever forward to completely lower snowblower to the ground and lock in float position.
3. Adjust engine throttle setting to rpm indicated in tractor operator's manual.
4. Engage PTO.
NOTE: Operate snowblower at full throttle position for best performance.
5. Move engine throttle to full throttle position.
6. Unlock tractor park brake.
7. Begin forward travel slowly.

Quite generic, eh? The front blowers (47" & 54") are designed to operate at a mid-PTO speed of 2100 RPM, which is the speed you get when the tach is at the "PTO" mark. Some tractors, depending on how the governor is set will rev past this point which would result in the implement being driven faster than its intended speed. That is not necessarily a good thing.

Mid and Rear PTO implements should never be driven faster than their rated RPM.


 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all

Thank you all for the comments and feedback. I will chock it up to operator error, which is cool because at my age my dad can no longer knock me upside the head when I do something wrong. I'll go slower, take smaller passes and give it more time to clear the chute before backing away.

Am really hoping I dont have to deal with any more snow this year ... ready from spring.
 
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