Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
With the deep lugs, chains can't slide, made for a difficult install. I hope I have them tight enough. I'm concerned with them catching on the pin for 3pt side sway adjuster, if too loose.

I ended up using total length of inside adjustment chain. That is, I placed the hook in the longest length. The last link possible.

Then outside adjuster, with 4 possible links, I have 3 hanging loose, so it's the shortest possible length.

So I'm wondering from others what adjustments you ended up with. Did you use any kind of tool to draw them tight. I found a old. Ratchet Strap that had a cut strap. I cut the strap shorter, pounded a bit of the hooks flat. It worked very good to pull the ends together. Maybe help someone! Have a super day ! Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
Yep! PIA! I take my loose chain and wire tie them close so not to fly loose. I had one of my inside links come loose and catch on the bolt of the frame of the BH, going down hill. The tire locked up and made for an interesting ride sideways until it hit asphalt. I think I suck the whole seat up my @ss from the pucker factor. But survived and made mental note to not use zip ties again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'm glad you weren't hurt except for your pride and of course the pucker factor , ouch ! What are you doing with loose links now?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
If you can, a photo would assist is seeing how you have them installed. Installing the chains each winter is not something I look forward to. It seems I try a different technique each season.

I recommend safety wiring the latches and any loose ends you have flying around. If they come loose and catch on the fender, a hydraulic line or some other component it could be bad news.

Once you get your chains mounted "just right" I recommend trimming off any loose links. It makes reinstalling them next season a lot easier.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Agree on trimming extra links

I agree on trimming any extra lengths, unless the tires are old and new ones would likely be bigger. You can always buy repair links and add them back if you have to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,838 Posts
If you can, a photo would assist is seeing how you have them installed. Installing the chains each winter is not something I look forward to. It seems I try a different technique each season.

I recommend safety wiring the latches and any loose ends you have flying around. If they come loose and catch on the fender, a hydraulic line or some other component it could be bad news.

Once you get your chains mounted "just right" I recommend trimming off any loose links. It makes reinstalling them next season a lot easier.
I use hooks similar to the hooks from the factory rather than wiring. has that break in the past too. Cut a link and tighten one end around the last link, then stretch it tight at you can and hook on the last link you can. I have chain tighteners on mine, both front and rear. Made the fronts from a set I had just bought for the old tractor I sold. Work great, but you need to put a block on the turn stop, so the chains do not catch the hydraulic line on the cylinder. Just do not use 4x4 unless you really need it. Makes steering much better.

PS My chains are not the ones being discussed here.... Sorry.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Danbeck

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,554 Posts
I don't know how everybody else is doing it, but with my GX/turf tires I used to install them wheels on. I've found it far better with the R4's to remove the wheel, roll it onto a properly spread out chain and do the hookup that way. The tire can be flipped around or rolled around to work the slack out to get all the crosslinks down into the lug spaces and the side chains tight...

(Which reminds me I have to order the 2 cross links for my chains to fill in the open space at the connection...)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Danbeck

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
I've found it far better with the R4's to remove the wheel, roll it onto a properly spread out chain and do the hookup that way. The tire can be flipped around or rolled around to work the slack out to get all the crosslinks down into the lug spaces and the side chains tight...
Are your tires loaded? My loaded 2720 tires are close to 400 lbs. once I add the heavy chains. My method is to lay the chains out behind the tractor, tire side down, jack up one tire, lift the chain end closest the tractor and lay it on the tire, getting it caught in the lugs, rotate the tire by hand until the end of the chain hits the floor, then pull it under the tire and attach the hooks on the inside of the chain. Then hook the latch on the outside of the chain. Lower the tractor and repeat on the other side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,026 Posts
Are your tires loaded? My loaded 2720 tires are close to 400 lbs. once I add the heavy chains. My method is to lay the chains out behind the tractor, tire side down, jack up one tire, lift the chain end closest the tractor and lay it on the tire, getting it caught in the lugs, rotate the tire by hand until the end of the chain hits the floor, then pull it under the tire and attach the hooks on the inside of the chain. Then hook the latch on the outside of the chain. Lower the tractor and repeat on the other side.
This will be the first year installing chains on my 2520 w/loaded R4's this weekend. Since I can't man handle much of anything anymore I really like your method and am going to do just that. My wife already knows she will have to be out in the barn to help me.

I've been dealing with tire chains most of my life from cars/pickups to dump trucks to graders (heavy!!). One thing I haven't seen mentioned, which may of course be obvious, but I always install the chains, then run the machine/vehicle around for a minute or so, then go back and re-tighten the chains. No matter how tight you may think you have them the first time, after you run the machine around for a minute you'd be surprises how much more you can tighten them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for replies. HydroHarold on my outside side chain I was able to latch as short as possible. On my inside side chain it's hooked in last link. It's as long as possible. The cross links are between lugs and I'm unable to pull the inside side chain tighter. So the purpose of this post is to find out if this is what others encounter. When you pull the wheels, are you able to get that inside side chain tighter than I have with wheels on. I used tractor about a hour yesterday and the chains stayed put . So they might be ok as is. I need to purchase chain tighteners. I only plan to chain the rear wheels. I can see pulling the wheels would make the task somewhat easier. Good idea! At 76 I'm not sure I can lift to put them back on. Had a hard time when I pulled the left wheel for transmission fluid change. Thanks again for your replies, Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
My tires are not loaded. Jgayman I didn't even think of your method to start with a lug and rotate up and over. This was my first time for this machine. Can kind of adjust as the chain travels. Can you tell me where you end up with the side chains adjustments when done. I did the letting out of some air pressure to install. Tires so stiff, not sure that helped. Good idea, think I'll try this method next time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
This will be the first year installing chains on my 2520 w/loaded R4's this weekend. Since I can't man handle much of anything anymore I really like your method and am going to do just that. My wife already knows she will have to be out in the barn to help me.
I left out one step, I put the transmission in neutral to rotate the tire and then quickly bump it into low to stop the tire from rotating once I have some chain on the ground. Otherwise it is difficult to latch the chains while the tire continues to move.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
My tires are not loaded. Jgayman I didn't even think of your method to start with a lug and rotate up and over. This was my first time for this machine. Can kind of adjust as the chain travels. Can you tell me where you end up with the side chains adjustments when done. I did the letting out of some air pressure to install. Tires so stiff, not sure that helped. Good idea, think I'll try this method next time.
Once I have some chain on the floor I then shuffle the chain a bit to even it out and wiggle it back and forth to have about the same amount of sidewall coverage inside and out. This results in the chains being 95% centered and adjusted when I secure the end hooks.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by side chain adjustments. I have a circular rubber tensioner that goes on the outside.

I will take a photo of my chains tomorrow and post it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
Thanks for replies. HydroHarold on my outside side chain I was able to latch as short as possible. On my inside side chain it's hooked in last link. It's as long as possible.
You want to have each of the side chains the same length. When I lay mine on the ground both side chains are the same length and when mounted I am connecting the inside hook and outside latch at the same point in the chain.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Danbeck

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,026 Posts
I left out one step, I put the transmission in neutral to rotate the tire and then quickly bump it into low to stop the tire from rotating once I have some chain on the ground. Otherwise it is difficult to latch the chains while the tire continues to move.
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I know I'm not explaining my concern very well. I'll try another way. with my chains installed, on the outside, I have three links hanging loose, on the inside I have zero links hanging loose. I'm wondering how others end up. Should the inside and outside side chains be balanced. Same number of links hanging free. Did I do it ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,026 Posts
I know I'm not explaining my concern very well. I'll try another way. with my chains installed, on the outside, I have three links hanging loose, on the inside I have zero links hanging loose. I'm wondering how others end up. Should the inside and outside side chains be balanced. Same number of links hanging free. Did I do it ?
Yes - you should try to get them even just like you say.

If you have zero loose links on the inside, and 3 links loose on the outside, try to even it out by starting with one link loose on the inside. In all probability you'll end up with one link loose on the outside then.

They will work the way you have them as long as you can keep them tight (with stretchers). But myself, I get kind of OCD with all things like this and have to have them perfectly even for peace of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,554 Posts
No, my tires are not loaded so I never gave that a consideration (BOOOO!):laugh: A link or two of disparity between the inside and outside doesn't make much difference as long as there is enough side chain on each side to keep it off the tread. Run it, then check it, sometimes you can gain another link inside or outside after they "set". If you have the last link hooked on the inside and the side chain is riding away from the lugs it should be good. If you really want to "fiddle", you can try to get more cross chain to the back to gain a link... but, it's a big PIA.

I'm not a fan of "spreaders" (except on large plow truck tires where a broken cross link can cause too much slack and throw the chain). IF that inside chain is on the tire below the lugs and the outside is nearly the same there's no way that side chain can pass over the tire IF... IF the tire pressure is not too soft! With chains on I always ran tires at normal road pressures, dual singles or dual double chains. That worked for plowing but I can't say how it works on a semi on Soldier's Summit.

One useful tip:(?) A simple pry bar under the tread to lift a tire with one hand and start a lug with the other is a help. I use one of those flat "nail puller" curved "L bars" with a small block of wood for the fulcrum. FWIW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,838 Posts
No, my tires are not loaded so I never gave that a consideration (BOOOO!):laugh: A link or two of disparity between the inside and outside doesn't make much difference as long as there is enough side chain on each side to keep it off the tread. Run it, then check it, sometimes you can gain another link inside or outside after they "set". If you have the last link hooked on the inside and the side chain is riding away from the lugs it should be good. If you really want to "fiddle", you can try to get more cross chain to the back to gain a link... but, it's a big PIA.

I'm not a fan of "spreaders" (except on large plow truck tires where a broken cross link can cause too much slack and throw the chain). IF that inside chain is on the tire below the lugs and the outside is nearly the same there's no way that side chain can pass over the tire IF... IF the tire pressure is not too soft! With chains on I always ran tires at normal road pressures, dual singles or dual double chains. That worked for plowing but I can't say how it works on a semi on Soldier's Summit.

One useful tip:(?) A simple pry bar under the tread to lift a tire with one hand and start a lug with the other is a help. I use one of those flat "nail puller" curved "L bars" with a small block of wood for the fulcrum. FWIW
Like another has stated here, I jack it up. If the FEL or blower is on, I use the hydraulics to lift the front end of the tractor to stabilize it side to side, I then can jack the tractor from the rear with my floor jack simultaneously. Then putting jack stands under each rear axle for safety, I lower it back down on the jack stands. I then lay the chains out on the floor sliding them under the tires and hooking them on the lugs. Then just rotating the tires(yep in neutral) clockwise, the chains pull themselves up around. With everything in the air the other tire on the opposite side that will normally rotate counter-clockwise looking from the side you are working on will allow very easy rotation. Hook the back a little loose, hook the front a little loose then keep playing with them until you get them the way you want them. Then loosen the outside, tighten the inside and re tighten the outside, put the chain tension springs on and repeat on the other three wheels. I try to offset the back side chain from the front, so there is a diagonal on the cross links. helps to keep them from falling into the lugs as much. The lugs on the R4s keep them from re-aligning across from each other.
This is what works for me. Of course I have the 4 ton floor jack and the jack stands and would not recommend trying this method if you do not.:thumbup1gif:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Danbeck

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
As promised, below are some photos of the chains on my 2720. It was a bit frosty out there this morning (20 degrees). Snow will be here in Central PA before you know it. The first two photos are the rear chains and the third photo is the front chains.

IMG_1114.jpg IMG_1115.jpg IMG_1116.jpg
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top