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I'd like some opinions on the idea of utilizing a carport as a base frame for a Loafing shed. Carports are cheap to buy in my area, and it seems like it would work well as a base frame and roof structure. Any thoughts?
 

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I'd like some opinions on the idea of utilizing a carport as a base frame for a Loafing shed. Carports are cheap to buy in my area, and it seems like it would work well as a base frame and roof structure. Any thoughts?
A loafing shed for animals or people?
 

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A couple of horses.
Like grnspot110 said, watch out for sharp edges. Horses seem to, well...horse around allot. They like to chew on word corners also, but otherwise, compared to cattle, they treat buildings pretty well.
 

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A loafing shed for animals or people?
Arlen, had the same question myself, I just caught two of our custodians yesterday "loafing" in our carport/shed where we keep our lawn equipment and I smelled something way out of the ordinary too, like they were burning their socks.. When I asked them why they weren't working one of them says; I didn't see you coming! Great answer, and for his prize for being such a smart-aleck; three days off with no pay, and I never want to smell that smell again either :nunu:.. Why can't we just get horses or some cattle, so what its a town hall? Becker college is right next door and they are all about animals, most of them will be veterinarians after they graduate. Animals are so much better to deal with than these kids who you can never find when you want them! :banghead:
 

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I'd like some opinions on the idea of utilizing a carport as a base frame for a Loafing shed. Carports are cheap to buy in my area, and it seems like it would work well as a base frame and roof structure. Any thoughts?
A couple of horses.
We have thought about this many times over the years, never took the plunge.
 

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We have thought about this many times over the years, never took the plunge.
Giz, with all the money you've made selling Peanut Brittle along with invention patents, take that plunge and see how it works before Tonton spends his hard earned dough! He's got two kids (that we've seen anyway) with Four Wheelers to keep after! :good2:
 

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Tonton, the only thing I know to watch out for is snow on the roof. We don't get much down here but a wet heavy snow can and will collapse a roof. When my parents moved after we broke away from the Amish in Michigan the place they bought had a car port. Roof collapsed the first winter, right on top of their car. On the other hand they do make them stronger now days. Oh and you do want to make sure it's anchored down good because of the wind.
 

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i dont see why not. just bend the corners of the trim back so they are not sharp.

we built a carport back in 2010. in the last six years, it has been the end of the line for over 3500 chickens, turkeys, and rabbits, with a few sheep mixed in. it has served us well, and makes a great selter.
 

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Tonton, the only thing I know to watch out for is snow on the roof. We don't get much down here but a wet heavy snow can and will collapse a roof. When my parents moved after we broke away from the Amish in Michigan the place they bought had a car port. Roof collapsed the first winter, right on top of their car. On the other hand they do make them stronger now days. Oh and you do want to make sure it's anchored down good because of the wind.
this^^^^

yes, make sure you get a good brand. i think we have an all-steel carport. it is on a 6" pad and is anchored with concrete bolts that were drilled in the concrete.
 

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Tonton, the only thing I know to watch out for is snow on the roof. We don't get much down here but a wet heavy snow can and will collapse a roof. When my parents moved after we broke away from the Amish in Michigan the place they bought had a car port. Roof collapsed the first winter, right on top of their car. On the other hand they do make them stronger now days. Oh and you do want to make sure it's anchored down good because of the wind.
That's why you won't see car ports around here - snow load.

Have you thought about building one? Do you have any small saw mills around?

We built our pavilion with rough sawn lumber which at the time was 1/3 the cost of planed lumber - just used treated 4x4 for the posts. My father-in-law built the trusses in the barn the week prior and I also set the posts - the rest went up in 1 afternoon with 3 people.

You could easily do something similar with a shed style roof. I now use this more as an equipment shed - would close in 3 sides for that purpose but that would ruin our view of the creek.

IMGP1289.JPG
 

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If you look at a lot of the sties that sell steel buildings, most of the carports and loafing sheds they sell are the same basic structures. Take a carport, add three side walls and some wood panels to the interior of the walls so the animals don't dent the walls when they kick and you've got a loafing shed.

You just need to make sure you're covered for snow and wind loads.
 

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The car ports I looked at all seemed thin and flimsy, and some of the portable ones look like they would be tough to anchor very well. The ones I'm thinking of are also open on an end instead of the side, which for a loafing shed I think open on the long side would be preferable.

I built our 12X24 post frame, steel roof and siding loafing shed for about $2,000. By the time you buy a carport, add sides, anchor it, etc I think you'd be getting close to that price.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Have you thought about building one?
Yes, this is a consideration. I've built a similar structure that, once completed, will serve as our chicken coop for our backyard flock. It has turned out pretty nice so far, but it is taking me too long to finish with just the wife and I as the labor (kids are too young to effectively help out). I've calculated the cost on the coop so far, and it is exceeding $800 in materials for an 8' x 8' structure. A carport will get me a structure 12' x 21' with a roof for just under $600, then I would add the siding and interior walls (lumber) as we go along. The carport would give the horses a roof to get out of the rain and sun right away, and I can add the sides/interior at my own pace throughout the spring, summer, and fall months. I realize it will ultimately cost a bit more than building it all myself, but the instant shelter is very appealing.
 

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Yes, this is a consideration. I've built a similar structure that, once completed, will serve as our chicken coop for our backyard flock. It has turned out pretty nice so far, but it is taking me too long to finish with just the wife and I as the labor (kids are too young to effectively help out). I've calculated the cost on the coop so far, and it is exceeding $800 in materials for an 8' x 8' structure. A carport will get me a structure 12' x 21' with a roof for just under $600, then I would add the siding and interior walls (lumber) as we go along. The carport would give the horses a roof to get out of the rain and sun right away, and I can add the sides/interior at my own pace throughout the spring, summer, and fall months. I realize it will ultimately cost a bit more than building it all myself, but the instant shelter is very appealing.
I understand your plan. For the time being ignoring snow load, is there a way you could positively anchor the carport before you started adding anything. I am thinking of something like sinking 4x4's at each corner (and maybe a center side) and attach the car port uprights to these posts. It doesn't take long to dig 4-6 holes with a post hole digger (read hand tool), set the posts with a bag of quick-crete poured in around the posts dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I understand your plan. For the time being ignoring snow load, is there a way you could positively anchor the carport before you started adding anything. I am thinking of something like sinking 4x4's at each corner (and maybe a center side) and attach the car port uprights to these posts. It doesn't take long to dig 4-6 holes with a post hole digger (read hand tool), set the posts with a bag of quick-crete poured in around the posts dry.
We think similarly Stan. I have a PHD and 4" x 4" treated posts here at the house. I can get this done quick, just dropping posts at the four corners and attaching the carport to them.

As for snow load, I think our worst snowfall here in my area in recent memory was 6", which was the blizzard of '93.
 

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We think similarly Stan. I have a PHD and 4" x 4" treated posts here at the house. I can get this done quick, just dropping posts at the four corners and attaching the carport to them.

As for snow load, I think our worst snowfall here in my area in recent memory was 6", which was the blizzard of '93.
They do make screw anchors and not those small cheap things for prefab carports; fabric or metal.. If you have the availability of using a hammer drill you can use a 1/2" drive socket (or better) that fits the top of the anchor and get those anchors pretty deep without busting your butt, and they will hold in the wind.
I also know a guy down the street with a PhD in electrical engineering, he make pickles with his wife that they sell at flea markets!!!!! :laugh::laugh: He also mows my grass at times!
 
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