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Discussion Starter #1
I upgraded to a Android Motorola Droid Maxx 2 smart phone the first of the year. Things worked well until about a month ago when there was a system software update.
About 2 weeks ago, I could not hear people when they called. Also I could not hear voice mails that they left. I could hear voice mails that were left before the issue with me not being able to hear callers. That eliminated an internal speaker problem. I went into settings, the only change I made was to turn on video calling. That solved the problem then.

Last night we went out to dinner, I set the phone to vibrate. After I got home, I checked the phone & someone had called & left a voice mail. I could not hear the voice mail, but again I could hear older voice mails. I called the person back, I could not hear the phone ring & could not hear the person I called. They called right back, but I could not hear them. I called them back on a work phone & they stated they could hear me fine.

I did a Google search on this issue & found hundreds of complaint on this issue going back to 2010. Also there were hundreds of things to try, but not surefire solution.
I did find that in the search that if I use the external speaker, I can hear the caller & their voice mails.
This appears to me to be limited to phone calls.

I am about ready to go back to a flip phone. That is what the work phone is.

Anyone had this problem or have any idea on how to solve it?
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
After lunch I did some more google searching on this issue. I found this solution in an Apple board.

"Just push the top area (near the speaker and front camera) gently with your thumb.

That's it."

I thought that it cannot be that simple + I do not have an Apple phone, but I had nothing to lose. I have a full defender case on my phone, so I removed the case, pushed on the phone as described above. I can now hear phone calls again.

Is there some hidden feature in smart phones that only a few know about?
Or is it that the internals of all smart phones are really the same & there is a defect in them.
 

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Is it an android? if so that explains it.... Android sucks.:laugh:
 

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After lunch I did some more google searching on this issue. I found this solution in an Apple board.

"Just push the top area (near the speaker and front camera) gently with your thumb.

That's it."

I thought that it cannot be that simple + I do not have an Apple phone, but I had nothing to lose. I have a full defender case on my phone, so I removed the case, pushed on the phone as described above. I can now hear phone calls again.

Is there some hidden feature in smart phones that only a few know about?
Or is it that the internals of all smart phones are really the same & there is a defect in them.
Cell phones are all surface mount devices of one type or another. Much of the componentry in modern phones isn't soldered to the board. It is pressure glued on with contact pads for the electric connection. This makes them less susceptible to vibration and torsional stresses( like being in a pocket) but can come with other side effects. Basically you re-bonded your speaker and some other components. Hope it stays well for you

Is it an android? if so that explains it.... Android sucks.:laugh:
Hmm...... interesting opinion.... I'd have to completely disagree :nunu:
 

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Cell phones are all surface mount devices of one type or another. Much of the componentry in modern phones isn't soldered to the board. It is pressure glued on with contact pads for the electric connection. This makes them less susceptible to vibration and torsional stresses( like being in a pocket) but can come with other side effects. Basically you re-bonded your speaker and some other components. Hope it stays well for you
Actually, it depends on the phone, and the component. In an iPhone, for example, the speaker has actual metal contacts that are pressed against a flat cable and the speaker is held in place with a cover that is screwed down. On the other end of that, however, is a snap-in connector that allows the "front" of the phone to be removed and re-installed to the body if necessary.

What is ACTUALLY happening when you squeeze the phone is that you are re-seating this connector that has most likely separated (partially) because the device was dropped.

I would bet that the actual change in ability to hear audio would also be partially tied to an operating system upgrade that changed the audio codecs and started using different signaling. The cable may not have been seated correctly prior, and there was never an observed problem because certain pins weren't being used. If the problem started "on its own" (not correlated to an OS upgrade), then it's likely that the phone was dropped face-down and within a couple of days the problem started.
 

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Hmm...... interesting opinion.... I'd have to completely disagree :nunu:
I have a Motorola moto something running android 4. I hate it. I can never get the screen brightness high enough, and the icons are kind of small for my taste. on top of that, it will not call or receive calls unless i'm in town (but that may just be Verizon, even though they say they have the best network) I used to have an iphone 2 before I got this one. Everything was different on this phone, which is somewhat understandable, but it is where I acquired most of my distaste for android. kind of like if I had a deere and switched to an allis.

JMHO.:hide:
 

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I have a Motorola moto something running android 4. I hate it. I can never get the screen brightness high enough, and the icons are kind of small for my taste. on top of that, it will not call or receive calls unless i'm in town (but that may just be Verizon, even though they say they have the best network) I used to have an iphone 2 before I got this one. Everything was different on this phone, which is somewhat understandable, but it is where I acquired most of my distaste for android. kind of like if I had a deere and switched to an allis.

JMHO.:hide:
I've had the Samsung Galaxy S, Motorola Droid, Galaxy S3, Galaxy S4, Galaxy S5, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Note5, iPhone 5, iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, iPhone 6S+.

While the -concepts- of Android are very appealing to me, and the flexibility in many areas is terrific, the operating system is NOT ready for mass deployment. Upgrades go horribly wrong, whether or not you can get an upgrade is entirely up to the carrier, and there is no reliable way to back a device up so that you can easily switch to a new one. I've had multiple handsets replaced under warranty (all Samsung), some new some refurbished. Never have I been able to cleanly and easily switch to a new device, it involves HOURS of setup, and the specific user interface is completely up to a combination of the manufacturer and the carrier. Seriously? If I switch carriers but use the same model handset it might work entirely different?

I love the idea, but there is absolutely NO consistency to it. And the only way to get new versions of the operation system are to buy new handsets. By comparison, the iPhone 5S, came with iOS 7 and now runs iOS 10. And it works almost exactly the same as my iPhone 6S+ does except for a couple of small things (like raise to wake which only works if the handset has the M9 motion coprocessor chip).

As much as I absolutely HATE how little Apple lets you configure as a consumer, I do appreciate spending 99.9% of my time with a device just using it and not tinkering.
 
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