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Thinking about this coming winter and what rear wheel set up will provide the best traction for plowing snow. Would you guy's go with turf tires and (2-link) chains or lug tires for the best traction in snow? Tractor is a 455 with rear weights......driveway is paved.

Thanks!
 

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Owned a 425 yrs ago. with lug tires I still needed chains ,FEL has a MF 1455 over 35 yrs old he bought his with turf tires and he still needed chains.
Biggest difference during the summer I could mow all of our yards without chains, he never could he needed chains till he bought lug tires about 2 yrs after I bought the 425.
We do have 15 -20% slopes in our backyards my driveway is sloped,and we plowed our church parking lot and it is sloped not as bad as my drive but sloped.
Oh our driveways has concrete and church is paved. It also makes a difference if sun shines on drive during the day, to melt snow and then freezes before you can get out and plow.
 

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This is very debatable. Chains work best for packed snow and ice, but can cause damage to paved or concrete driveways. Lug tires work good in snow, but not so good on ice, but won't damage asphalt or concrete drives. And if you have a large slope or grade on your drive, chains is also best. 2 links is the better choice as it puts more cross chains onto the surface. Also 2 links work better on lug tires, though chains on lugs usually don't do as well as chains on turf tires. The chains tend to fall in the valley between the raised lugs and are not as effective as they are on turfs
 

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What kind of terrain are you working with?

If you're mostly level (slight grades), you would probably be just fine with wheel weights and the bare turfs. If you get a little slip, you could fill the rears to add another 100 lbs or so. Worst case would be to add some light chains. This would give you the most flexibility, including being able to pull the chains (if you end up using them) in the summer and going right back to mowing without missing a beat.
 

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Chains, the one's that have two links between cross links.

Doug
 

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Are you in Boston proper? North burbs? West? South? If you're NW (outside of 495 especially), you'll likely want filled rears, weights, AND chains. If you're more South Shore or inside of 128, chains are probably less of a need.
 

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Mid Hudson River Valley NY: First winter with the GX I tried "The Grand Experiment", plowing with turfs/no chains. (Cue the "wrong answer" horn!) I made the first pass to the street OK, it's downhill and even with the diff-lock engaged I almost didn't make it back up that single row with the blade up. Granted, it's on a hill, but if you have so much as a small strip of packed snow you are going to lose traction.

I'm a well chiseled 200+lbs (insert "B.S" emoticon here):laugh:, have 160lbs of suitcases on the back frame and 50lbs. of cast concrete behind them and it's still chains all the way. Even more weight would not help. Too many situations where you can get into trouble without chains. Pushing off the side into deeper snow with no chains = stuck, no backing out. Going in too far bunching up a pile with no chains = stuck. Chains allow you to plow way more snow than loading the tractor down with excessive weight which in most cases you have to take off in the mowing season anyway. Bar tires may put more weight on less rubber, but they'll ride right on top of snow just like turfs without chains and will slip. Been there, done that with a Gravely.

If the plowed surface scratching is a issue, try a rubber edge on the plow blade (not snowblower). It will reduce the amount of surface damage to near zero since it cleans so well the chains won't slip as much. (IF your plowing technique is good!) I found on my "painted" blacktop driveway that the damage wasn't coming from the chains, but from the steel plow edge.

Rubber edge caveat: You MUST do your plowing before the surfaces gets too packed down! After a few passes by cars the rubber will plow off only the loose snow and leave the "slider strips" of packed snow. I put the rubber edge on about 5 years ago and never took it off again. It also makes the plow very useful for cleaning up white pine storm damaged branches, you can push them into piles right on the frozen lawn with no damage. Up until I got the Johnny Bucket Jr. I used the plow to crowd firewood splits up to the stacks without tearing up too much soil with the plow edge...
 

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Mid Hudson River Valley NY: First winter with the GX I tried "The Grand Experiment", plowing with turfs/no chains. (Cue the "wrong answer" horn!) I made the first pass to the street OK, it's downhill and even with the diff-lock engaged I almost didn't make it back up that single row with the blade up. Granted, it's on a hill, but if you have so much as a small strip of packed snow you are going to lose traction.

I'm a well chiseled 200+lbs (insert "B.S" emoticon here):laugh:, have 160lbs of suitcases on the back frame and 50lbs. of cast concrete behind them and it's still chains all the way. Even more weight would not help. Too many situations where you can get into trouble without chains. Pushing off the side into deeper snow with no chains = stuck, no backing out. Going in too far bunching up a pile with no chains = stuck. Chains allow you to plow way more snow than loading the tractor down with excessive weight which in most cases you have to take off in the mowing season anyway. Bar tires may put more weight on less rubber, but they'll ride right on top of snow just like turfs without chains and will slip. Been there, done that with a Gravely.

If the plowed surface scratching is a issue, try a rubber edge on the plow blade (not snowblower). It will reduce the amount of surface damage to near zero since it cleans so well the chains won't slip as much. (IF your plowing technique is good!) I found on my "painted" blacktop driveway that the damage wasn't coming from the chains, but from the steel plow edge.

Rubber edge caveat: You MUST do your plowing before the surfaces gets too packed down! After a few passes by cars the rubber will plow off only the loose snow and leave the "slider strips" of packed snow. I put the rubber edge on about 5 years ago and never took it off again. It also makes the plow very useful for cleaning up white pine storm damaged branches, you can push them into piles right on the frozen lawn with no damage. Up until I got the Johnny Bucket Jr. I used the plow to crowd firewood splits up to the stacks without tearing up too much soil with the plow edge...
Nice write up!
 

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Poncho:

I plowed my dirt driveway (600 feet on a grade with a curve) for 16 years with my 445 equipped as follows:

54 Blade
Wheel weights (1 pair)
Six JD suitcase weights mounted on rear weight bracket
JD chains (cross chain on every other link on the side chains)
Ag tires

It plows snow like a little bulldozer, but I have been stuck a few times over the years, mostly due to my own stupidity. Like Hydroharold says, in deep snow, you have to push off to the side. However, it will handle a foot of snow or more with no problem. Plowing snow would be fun if you could do the job at 50 or 60 degrees.:laugh:

This year I will use the 2320 and 200CX loader, with no chains, eight suitcase weights on an Omni hitch and 4WD. I may have to add weight, but I am going to try to avoid chains, because they are such a PITA to deal with.

Don
 

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I have to admit, I was not in the "plowing" mindset for some reason when I commented before... I was thinking snowblowing, and the needs there are reduced. For plowing, chains makes the most sense.

My gut says that turfs would still be preferable since they're better for mowing and it's a more even tread to keep the chains in contact with the ground.
 

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Chains. Ordered rear chains the first week after the tractor was delivered. I installed the rear chains and have never taken them off.
 

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Chains. Ordered rear chains the first week after the tractor was delivered. I installed the rear chains and have never taken them off.
Do you mean that you leave them all year round?
 

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I know of a few people that leave chains on lawn tractors year round. Some need them to mow. I all most had to do this with my murrey.
 

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gotdeeres:

Is that picture taken in Georgia? I didn't realize that you all got that much snow.

Don
 

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This is my 455 with nine suitcase weights, fluid in the tires and bar lugs. I stopped to take a picture, not because I could not push more. The key to using bar lugs is a lot of weight and scrape the pavement so they have something to grip.

GotDeeres

View attachment 11157
Thats just a light dusting. :lol:
 

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I grew up on a farm in NW Indiana and know about big snows! This was a snow/ice storm last year which shut down Atlanta until the temperature warmed up. Snow equipment is sparse in Atlanta. The schools were closed for 10 days and then it was uncertain the buses could make it. My little 455 and bucket made me $650 plowing a car dealership's car lot because there was nothing else available. I actually did a very good job with my Compact Loader.

Just got to love John Deeres ,

GotDeeres
 

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Thats just a light dusting. :lol:
I was thiniking the same. But, it was a moneymaker for gotdeeres.:thumbup1gif:
 
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