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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of changing out my auger bearings on my 47" JD snow blower and my question is; When I re-install the auger with new bearings should I leave the eccentric collars loose until I bolt the auger back in or set those before I re-install? Seems the auger needs to be somewhat tight on the blower case Help please.
Thanks for any help in this regard.
Jeff
 

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Bolt up and then set the collars. Also set them aginst the direction of rotation. There are YouTube videos showing how.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bolt up and then set the collars. Also set them aginst the direction of rotation. There are YouTube videos showing how.
Thanks, I figured that was the way to go but I did watch one video and the guy set everything before he installed the auger back in the case and I said; to me it seems like you need to bolt it back up then set the collars. Thanks for the answer. Now to get the old bearings off the shaft!!! I haven't tried that yet, ran out of time yesterday and I'm expecting it not to be quite so easy..
 

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I have never had any problems removing these bearings. I have changed them once on my original blower I bought in 1995 and twice on the blower I bought in 2009. The 95 blower when I scrapped it, the bearing on the drivers side actually was loose and wore the shaft down to where I could not salvage it. I had clamped the bearing in the wrong direction and the collar was loose. Learned my lesson then. The newer blower bearings were changed as a preventative measure when I installed the enclosed chain drive last year. I kept the old bearings as they are still feeling good.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I too changed out the new chain case and just last storm I had an awful vibration and the chain case is really sloppy this year. So I started it up and observed the front auger and saw the play back and forth and my heart sank. I drive her in take the blower off and put it up on the lift and I could hear a thump rotating the auger. Took off the parallel case and removed the auger assembly.
The right side looking at the blower was loose so bearing is junk. I'm hoping all the bearings in the blower from the old chain drive deal are the same because I have 5 of those with new bearing housings and collars.
I'll be changing out both bearings and installing my "spare" new parallel chain case I bought just in case. I will keep the case I installed last year, maybe nothing wrong with it but there was a lot of back and forth in that auger! I don't want to do this twice this winter!!!
Thanks for your reply, I can always count on you guys here on GTT..
 

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Use an angle grinder with a cutoff disk and with one quick slice the bearing will come loose. Cut almost all the way through and then drive a wedge punch in there to split it the rest of the way.
 

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I too changed out the new chain case and just last storm I had an awful vibration and the chain case is really sloppy this year. So I started it up and observed the front auger and saw the play back and forth and my heart sank. I drive her in take the blower off and put it up on the lift and I could hear a thump rotating the auger. Took off the parallel case and removed the auger assembly.
The right side looking at the blower was loose so bearing is junk. I'm hoping all the bearings in the blower from the old chain drive deal are the same because I have 5 of those with new bearing housings and collars.
I'll be changing out both bearings and installing my "spare" new parallel chain case I bought just in case. I will keep the case I installed last year, maybe nothing wrong with it but there was a lot of back and forth in that auger! I don't want to do this twice this winter!!!
Thanks for your reply, I can always count on you guys here on GTT..
Check the Auger shaft where it enters the front gear box. I had to cut new key ways in my shaft as the key and way were worn so bad. The key was almost cut in half. Fortunately my brother has a small machine shop for his hobby and I didn't have to pay for it. All the bearings used on the Quick Hitch 47" and 54" blowers are the same.
 
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Thanks, I figured that was the way to go but I did watch one video and the guy set everything before he installed the auger back in the case and I said; to me it seems like you need to bolt it back up then set the collars. Thanks for the answer. Now to get the old bearings off the shaft!!! I haven't tried that yet, ran out of time yesterday and I'm expecting it not to be quite so easy..
Jeff,

It might be too late for this tip but as far as the auger shaft side bearings are concerned, leave the locking collars loose before reinstallation.

I usually install the locking collar, inner retainer, bearing, outer retainer and spacer on each shaft end. Move the assemblies as far inboard as possible to allow additional room for the auger assembly upon reinstallation.

Then I use a couple of small zip ties to keep bearing retainers and side spacers aligned and contained leaving one bolt hole open. Roll the auger assembly into position, fit it up then after catching the top carriage bolt on each side, cut and remove the zip ties holding everything together. Bolt the side retainers in place. Then drive the locking collars over the eccentric bearing hub against the direction of rotation and you're good to go.
 
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Just an FYI if you are in need of the bearing for the blower. This is the Timken part number for the bearing shipped with the locking collar. They have a better load rating than the JD bearings.


Yellow Automotive tire Material property Tin Bumper
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Guy's, all very good information, now to head out and finish this project today,,,,, before Monday's storm! I hope.....
Jeff
 
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Just an FYI if you are in need of the bearing for the blower. This is the Timken part number for the bearing shipped with the locking collar. They have a better load rating than the JD bearings.


View attachment 821619
Now there's a good tip! Unfortunately I have few of the JD bearings and collars on the shelf just in case.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
same with me, I still have a couple bearings, locking collars and bearing housings left..
Done, piece of cake actually and a lift helps an old man like me!. One bearing fell apart into pieces and came right off the shaft and the other that was still good just needed a little persuasion. All went back together with both new bearings and parts and the spare new chain case was put on. Funny thing; this time the chain case went right on and the bolt holes were lined up? That did not happen the first time, I had to persuade the case to line up. Runs great, same amount of noise with the case but nice and smooth auger again..
Thanks guys for your help as always. (y)
Sorry no pics but you guys know what it all looks like, it was to darned cold to take them in my opinion, no heat in the garage and I didn't want to run the kerosene heater today. ! I just wanted to get the job done..
Jeff
 

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Bolt up and then set the collars. Also set them aginst the direction of rotation. There are YouTube videos showing how.
Everything I have ever read says to lock the collars in the direction of shaft rotation. All the locking collars on my 54-inch blower were installed as such when I disassembled it. I also looked up a Timken bearing installation guide and it says the same thing. Word is if tightened opposite the direction of rotation they can loosen up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Everything I have ever read says to lock the collars in the direction of shaft rotation. All the locking collars on my 54-inch blower were installed as such when I disassembled it. I also looked up a Timken bearing installation guide and it says the same thing. Word is if tightened opposite the direction of rotation they can loosen up.
crap.............. Are you sure J? I installed mine against the direction of rotation.. No big deal to go out and reverse what I did but........
 
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crap.............. Are you sure J? I installed mine against the direction of rotation.. No big deal to go out and reverse what I did but........
Jeff,

Wouldn't worry about it. I've always installed bearing lock collars against the direction of rotation. Never had one loosen up.

Also worked as an I.E. in a textile plant about 100 years ago. All of the equipment we had that used bearings with locking collars were installed the same way according to the director of plant maintenance. That equipment was pounded three shifts a day, six days a week. Then again maybe it's just a matter of opinion and as long as they're locked you're A-ok regardless of direction. I'm not so sure.

All of jgayman's collars are going to loosen up and fail......... ;)
 

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crap.............. Are you sure J? I installed mine against the direction of rotation.. No big deal to go out and reverse what I did but........
I'm not expert, just going by the information I found when installing mine. The factory collars on my blower seemed to agree. Here is the Timken information...

Font Line Elbow Motor vehicle Auto part


Here is something else I found...

"It might sound wrong, so you really need to get a bearing and collar and see how this works. Slip the bearing on the shaft and then put the lock on and barely tighten it by hand, the way you're doing it. Now hold the collar and turn the shaft and inner race like the bearing was starting to sieze. If you've tightened opposite the rotation, the collar will loosen. If you've tightened with the rotation, the collar will get tighter if the bearing tries to slip on the shaft. "
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Jeff,

Wouldn't worry about it. I've always installed bearing lock collars against the direction of rotation. Never had one loosen up.

Also worked as an I.E. in a textile plant about 100 years ago. All of the equipment we had that used bearings with locking collars were installed the same way according to the director of plant maintenance. That equipment was pounded three shifts a day, six days a week. Then again maybe it's just a matter of opinion and as long as they're locked you're A-ok regardless of direction. I'm not so sure.

All of jgayman's collars are going to loosen up and fail......... ;)
You know Frank, I've read and viewed the collars going both ways as you can see in the video! To me it makes sense to have the collar in the opposite direction of the shaft so the shaft puts the load against the collar.. Ah, the heck with it. It's done and either way I can tighten it back up if it indeed loosens up..
Hope I didn't start something! I'm leaving it alone..
Jeff
 

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I'm not expert, just going by the information I found when installing mine. The factory collars on my blower seemed to agree. Here is the Timken information...

View attachment 821658

Here is something else I found...

"It might sound wrong, so you really need to get a bearing and collar and see how this works. Slip the bearing on the shaft and then put the lock on and barely tighten it by hand, the way you're doing it. Now hold the collar and turn the shaft and inner race like the bearing was starting to sieze. If you've tightened opposite the rotation, the collar will loosen. If you've tightened with the rotation, the collar will get tighter if the bearing tries to slip on the shaft. "
Good information John as usual. Thanks! Regardless, I'm leaving mine alone!
 
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You know Frank, I've read and viewed the collars going both ways as you can see in the video! To me it makes sense to have the collar in the opposite direction of the shaft so the shaft puts the load against the collar.. Ah, the heck with it. It's done and either way I can tighten it back up if it indeed loosens up..
Hope I didn't start something! I'm leaving it alone..
Jeff
I agree. Seriously, it's not a big deal and there are obviously some differing opinions. They're locked. Don't worry about it. (y) (y)
 
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