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I have noticed the battery in my tractor wasn't as strong starting the tractor recently, so I checked the battery in the only meaningful way, with a battery load tester. Here is what the battery load tester showed. It showed the battery tested fine with 12 volts while setting there but the moment I exposed the battery to a 10 second load, it showed the battery was not at full strength.

This battery is 25 months old and has about 400 hours of engine running time. With winter coming, its time for a new battery.
 

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The battery is buried at the front of the tractor. The Technical Service manual isn't real helpful it basically says "Replace battery by removing it and reinstalling it, removing a headlight is required to get the battery out of the compartment, replace in reverse order" or something sort of like that. This will give you some more details of what you need to remove and what you don't need to remove the replace the battery.

Here is a picture of the front of the tractor when you have the Mauser Cab. You have the windshield washer tank and the bracket, as well as the wiring and the pump, etc. which is in the way, for sure.
 

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Unplug the washer tank pump power wire. Lift the tank up and forward and it comes off the bracket. Set the tank off to the side, I placed it on the hood guard.

Use a 10mm ratchet wrench and a box end wrench of 10mm on the opposite side and remove the bracket which holds the washer fluid tank.

Unplug the headlights on each side and move the wires out of the way.
 

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Use a 10mm Deep well socket and remove the two long bolts on the right side headlight. DO NOT remove the short bolts on the out side of the head light, near the right side of the tractor as you are going to remove the entire assembly with as little disassembly as possible,. Here is what the bolts look like.

The two plastic brackets shown are the side on the right of the right headlight where the short bolts and the bracket slide into this assembly to hold it.

Once you remove the headlight assembly, remove the two long bolts which are threaded into the plastic housing of the grille. Be VERY CAREFULL TO NOT mess up the threads on these studs. Use pliers or something similar and back the studs out of the plastic grill housing. Make sure to pay attention to where the springs are located in the assembly. DO not drop them as you need them to adjust the headlights.
 

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Use a 1/2" ratchet wrench and loosen the battery cables on the battery. Be careful to not make any contact with the wrench when on the positive battery terminal or sparks will fly. Remove the battery cables and clean them carefully on the inside of the battery terminal to make sure there will be a good connection on the new battery.

Remove the battery vent. Here is what it looks like, on the right side of the battery and it vents down below the battery tray and the radiator assembly.

Check the battery vent as they plug with dirt and debris. Note the condition of the vent on mine before and after I used the air compressor and blew the dirt out of the vent tube......

Note, there is a cab on the other side of the battery on the opposite side vent location on the battery. Remove the cap and keep it for use on your new battery as the new battery didn't come with the little cap to plug the opposite side vent of the one which has the vent hose on it. Clean the vent tube and cap and prepare to use it on the new battery.
 

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Reach down into the battery compartment and remove the battery strap and place it off to the side. Carefully lift the battery and I ended up rotating the battery and bringing it out length wise to get it out of the compartment. Hang onto the battery as it is not light (about 35lbs) and its dirty from being in the front of the tractor. Make sure to not catch your sleeves on the other long headlight bolts.
 

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Clean the area where the battery sits in the battery well. Now that i have seen how the battery sits down in the well, I don't object to the rubber tarp strap as a hold down as I did when I first saw it used on the tractor. The battery can't slide anywhere nor does it have any chance to tip as it is recessed into the well about 1/4th of the battery depth.

Clean all of the area and the battery cables while you have the battery removed. I used soap and water and then my 58v Battery Operated Hand Held Echo blower to dry the battery tray and area as it was cold here today.

Now is a good time to install a Battery Tender plug in leads on the battery terminals when its reinstalled. This way the new battery will be monitored and kept on the tender, which will help keep it properly charged in the cold winter weather.

If your tractor has any extra leads for power attached to the battery cables, now is a great time to carefully check these wires and connections. My tractor has the sprayer harness which provides live 12 volt at the rear of the cab from direct leads from the battery. I replaced both of the wire connectors which attach to the battery posts as they were bent up and somewhat corroded.

I also added about 6" or wire to the positive and negative leads and they were installed very tight and I wanted the wires to not be pulled as they were. I spliced those in with new heat shrink connectors to attach to the battery terminals.

Set the new battery down in the tray and if you have all of the rest done and make sure to not pinch any wires, etc.

Reverse the process and you are good to go. Don't forget to strap the battery back down.

Make sure to put the springs for the headlight mounts in the correct place as these are how the headlights are aimed and adjusted. Take a picture of these before disassembling them or you can always look at the other headlight to make sure you are putting them back together correctly.

When you have the headlight out of the assembly, its a great time to clean the headlight lens really well. Also make sure to not pull the headlight wires when getting the battery in and out.

Note on the last photo how the two long headlight bolts I removed now have zip ties on them. I used these as the securing point for the new Battery Tender charging leads. I tied the harness to these posts so it can't pull on the battery posts if I should forget to unplug the tender and the worst that will happen is it will unplug the tender from the harness.

Obviously, it would be best to unplug it by hand and not rip it out by driving the tractor away, but knowing I am unplugging and doing this at 2:30am, its best I take precautions to not damage anything or short out the battery wires, etc.

There you have it, replacing the battery in your 1025R with the Mauser Cab. Without the cab, you won't have the washer tank, supply line and harness to deal with nor will the bracket be on the tractor which mounts to the frame of the radiator screen and core support.

I took my time and cleaned things and also replaced the wiring connections with new heat shrink connections. It took me over an hour to replace the battery with these extra steps, but I also wasn't working on flat rate. Simply getting the battery in and out should be maybe a 30 minute job.

Very handy tools to have to do this include the following;

1/4" Drive ratchet and 10MM deep well socket
1/2" Box end wrench
1/2" Ratchet box end wrench
Battery Terminal Puller
Heat shrink tubing and small butane torch (my cigar lighter....):laugh:
Long regular blade screw driver to help spread the battery terminals
Electrical wire strippers and crimpers if replacing other wires to the battery
Good gloves for handling the battery

Removing the headlight bolts is MUCH EASIER with the deep well socket and ratchet. Remember, only remove the long heallight adjust bolts on ONE SIDE of the headlight. Also, do NOT loosen the small headlight mounting bolts, you will remove them in place with the entire mounting frame and headlight lens assembly.
 

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Great write up on replacing the battery with the Mauser cab.

What battery did you install this time around. From JD or other?
Than you for the compliment.

I went with another John Deere battery. The battery is a size 22NF and there aren't a lot of batteries in that physical size which have the same cold cranking amps at 600cca as the Deere battery. It was $99 plus tax at my dealer.

I looked at several race car batteries, as I always ran a gell battery in my race cars and they are small, have very high cranking power and very durable. Since the gell racing batteries don't use the traditional battery plates, they don't experience the same issues as the tractor batteries often do from the vibration. You can mount the race batteries in any position and they will work fine, not that I was going to change the install location on this tractor.

But no one had a battery in stock for my tractor in the racing batteries. The battery cables are quite tight and there isn't much room for any differences in the battery post position. Plus it sits down in the recess area in the compartment, so the battery certainly can't be any physically larger than the OEM one.

I have a lot of extra electrical equipment on my tractor. I added the upgraded alternator due to the cab and while the load when the tractor is running is often satisfied by the alternator output, I didn't want the reduced cold cranking amps of the alternate batteries which others did have in stock. Also, every other battery I found at Batteries Plus, Advance Auto, O;Reilly's, Autozone and one other local place, the prices were all $138 or more and they had less cold cranking amps, most were at 450cca.

Granted, 450 cca would likely suffice, but why compromise the power to start the tractor if I don't need to? It sure starts better with the new battery now.......

I could have ordered a battery, but as usual, when you need the battery, you need it right now. We have heavy snow forecast for this week so it looks like the tractor is going to be in use quite often this week........Plus I had to core aerate 6 acres today.
 

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Great writeup, Sully. Deere sure didn't make it easy for you. Why, in their infinite wisdom :mocking:, did JD change the hood to a fixed grill and side panels from a 'one piece' that hinges upward and gives you access to the entire engine and battery area? My 2520 is way easier to access the battery, radiator, air filter, heck, the whole front end. Swing out the grill guard, pop the hood release and lift it up. I could change my battery and be done before you even got to yours. I looked at 1025R and 2025R before finding the older gen tractor.
 

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Nice write up but oh my god you guys with cabs even have squirters! What do you do dirt track racing on the weekends that you need them?:mockery::lolol:
 

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I have noticed the battery in my tractor wasn't as strong starting the tractor recently, so I checked the battery in the only meaningful way, with a battery load tester. Here is what the battery load tester showed. It showed the battery tested fine with 12 volts while setting there but the moment I exposed the battery to a 10 second load, it showed the battery was not at full strength.

This battery is 25 months old and has about 400 hours of engine running time. With winter coming, its time for a new battery.
Behold, the famously fantastic cheese grater. Dare I ask Sulley, but How long have you been in possession of that great tool? I have grabbed a few over the years but most have been abused (I know it's fun) and the elements burn out. I have seen black case load testers around but the old shiny ones with analog needles I hold dear.
 

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Use a 1/2" ratchet wrench and loosen the battery cables on the battery. Be careful to not make any contact with the wrench when on the positive battery terminal or sparks will fly.
One should always take the negative off first, no sparks that way.
 

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One should always take the negative off first, no sparks that way.
And put the Positive on first hooking it back up. I was watching our Bus Mech change a battery out on one of the school busses. I mention to him to remove the neg first and he said I been doing this for as many years as you are old? Just then he shorted out his wrench and that is why I was trying to tell you that could happen. He was not to happy. We did not get along to well once I chased him around the Bus Garage with a dead rattle snake that was still moving. He was deathly afraid of snakes and I knew how to get even after that day! See when I went to work at the school bus garage to drive buses the first day he told me your sitting in my seat? I asked him where his name was on it. The other drivers looked nervous as this was going on. Well I did not move as I was there first in the morning and there was plenty of chairs around. Later I did get up and said you can have it back now I have to go to the bathroom. Guess I was self employed to long to hear that crap and let it be this way from now on. So I stood my ground and won.
 

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Nice write up but oh my god you guys with cabs even have squirters! What do you do dirt track racing on the weekends that you need them?:mockery::lolol:
LOL. The cab sure is toasty when the snow flies. The heater lets me wear a sweatshirt instead of a jacket when I'm using the front snowblower. The front windshield washer comes in handy when the blowing snow hits my warm windshield. I was thinking of getting the optional rear windshield wiper, but the cab heat keeps it clear melting the snow through the glass. :mocking:
 

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One should always take the negative off first, no sparks that way.
Not true if the wrench makes contact with a metal object when moving it on the positive terminal......Such as all of the metal brackets and frame members around the positive terminal. After all, a ground is a ground if its metal and the other end of the wrench is on the positive terminal.................
 

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Great writeup, Sully. Deere sure didn't make it easy for you. Why, in their infinite wisdom :mocking:, did JD change the hood to a fixed grill and side panels from a 'one piece' that hinges upward and gives you access to the entire engine and battery area? My 2520 is way easier to access the battery, radiator, air filter, heck, the whole front end. Swing out the grill guard, pop the hood release and lift it up. I could change my battery and be done before you even got to yours. I looked at 1025R and 2025R before finding the older gen tractor.
Trust me, I thought the very same thing as I was referring to the engineer who developed this system numerous times during the process. I may not have known the engineer's actual name, but plenty of alternatives were thought of due to this process.

I thought about taking the entire grill out in one piece and next time, I just might to see which process is easier. It's s bit tricky to lift the battery, twist it end for end and bring it up sideways all in one motion without a good way to hang onto the battery. There isn't enough room for your hands to be on the front and rear of the battery and clear the exit point. I would bet money the battery is set in the recess in the front panel before the grill assembly is installed at the factory..............
 
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Behold, the famously fantastic cheese grater. Dare I ask Sulley, but How long have you been in possession of that great tool? I have grabbed a few over the years but most have been abused (I know it's fun) and the elements burn out. I have seen black case load testers around but the old shiny ones with analog needles I hold dear.
I would guess I have had it probably 20 years, but they still sell them, just a lot cheaper made...............Heck, Harbor Fright sells one for $20, you can only imagine how well that would last compared to the one I use. But, they sure are accurate for diagnosing a weak battery and also for determining the charging system output. I did notice during the 2nd 10 second test run of the load so I could take the photo, I could smell the dust burning off the element in the tester..........

I am always amazed when there are posts on the GTT thread and someone starts out with "I turn the key and nothing happens" and then they proceed to explain that they "tested the battery the volt meter tells them the battery has 12 volts".........Many batteries read 12 volts when they have a bad plate, but under load, they are woefully inadequate to start the engine. That was the entire reason I took the two photo's to show that a battery can show and will show 12 volts and be in need of replacement.

Actually, the old battery was still starting the tractor, but clearly its not as strong as it should be, you could tell by the slower engine cranking and even the dash lights weren't as bright as they should be. When a battery reaches that condition at 40 degrees, its going to be trouble for sure when its below freezing. And we have a foot of snow (up to 2 feet in some areas) in the forecast starting tonight.

I carry a battery jump pack in the cab in a small case and the entire case with the pack and cables sits down next to the seat. The actual battery unit itself isn't much larger than my cell phone. But I have used it to jump start a neighbors V-8 pickup and also lawnmowers and smaller units. For obvious reasons, I don't want to attempt to put the traditional jumper cables on this battery. You would cut your hands to shreds getting the cables in past all of the sharp ended bolt studs and ends of plastic items everywhere.
 
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Nice write up but oh my god you guys with cabs even have squirters! What do you do dirt track racing on the weekends that you need them?:mockery::lolol:
LOL. The cab sure is toasty when the snow flies. The heater lets me wear a sweatshirt instead of a jacket when I'm using the front snowblower. The front windshield washer comes in handy when the blowing snow hits my warm windshield. I was thinking of getting the optional rear windshield wiper, but the cab heat keeps it clear melting the snow through the glass. :mocking:
If you don't have the front windshield washer, you could end up being one of those people you see who stop to throw snow on their windshields when their washers aren't working. That would mean getting out of the cab and let's face it, pushing the button is much preferred.:laugh::lolol:

Granted much of the spray is from the road traffic, but a streaked and dirty windshield is simply unacceptable if you are sitting inside the cab at 70 degrees in your shirt sleeves and sipping coffee.....and listening to the Sirius radio on your Blue Tooth Headset.........a push of the button on the applicable wiper (as both are connected to the washer tank) and PRESTO, clean glass.......:good2:

I just picked up another driveway to plow in the neighborhood and the guy owns a X5xx Deere and Snow Blower. He said he had been thinking about it and he decided he would rather write the check once a month and wake up to a nice clear driveway, than bundle up and go out and sit there in the cold and use the blower on his driveway. Fine with me, as I can plow his driveway in just 6 minutes with the big blade, so It helps me stay at my 8 to 10 driveways per hour desired plowing pace. He has to back his truck out of the garage to get his John Deere out and then put the truck back in so its out of the way and then reverse the process when he is done.

He said in his message, "The time I spend moving vehicles in and out to get the tractor out, you are already done and on to the next driveway before I have started". Yep, he is right. That now makes 5 driveways I plow where the people own their own equipment but find it easier to send a Paypal payment once a month or write a check than changing the tractors from mowing to blowing and then back again......Deere will send a technician out to remove the mower deck and install the blower and chains, etc. and then in the spring, switch it back. But the cost for the two service calls at 2 hours of labor each, usually will cover about a dozen driveway plow fees.

Ah, just got another call from another John Deere owner of an X3xx all wheel steer with a snow blower. He is having PTO problems and his mower and blower won't stay running and Deere has had it 4 times. So he asked me to plow his driveway as well. His is an expensive driveway to plow as it has a large parking area, big circle in the middle, etc.

Man, now I am up to 27 driveways and I really didn't want to go beyond 25, as 25 takes me about 3 hours to plow in a snowfall of 6" or so...decent pocket money for 3.5 hours work. The average winter, I don't start plowing until Late November and plow an average of 30 times. 2017 to 2018, I plowed a record 45 times between December 10th and February 14th. I put 168 hours on my tractor in its first 4 months of ownership.

I added the read wiper to my cab and also the rear mounted yellow safety light from Mauser which is on the 90 degree pivot to swing down to clear the garage door and then you swing it up on the spring loaded mount and it locks in place. I will admit I don't use the rear wiper much as I have the wireless camera with the monitor mounted right on the windshield, so I rarely turn to look out the rear window. The camera is mounted up on the rear of the cab roof and it stays amazingly free of snow and moisture and doesn't have any visibility issues.

Yesterday when I was core aerating some neighbors yards, the detail on the camera is so good I could see the cores and the holes punched in the yard behind me on the camera, but it was much harder to see with the naked eye when looking back over the shoulder. I have the 60" wide core aerator so its wider than the tractor and lining up the rows is easy with the camera.

Also, I would recommend anyone buying the cab probably doesn't need to spend the money for the rear wiper. Its handy, but used maybe 5% of the time the front wiper is used. I suppose if you were blowing snow and had the snow really swirling, the rear window might get more snow and water on it, but the heater melts it pretty quickly as the cab easily stays 70 degrees with the heater on medium and the fan blower on low............I used the heater on high and full heat only once and that was when it was -25F air temp and the wind was blowing 40 mph..........that's too cold for anyone to be outside in those conditions.
 
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