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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few mentioned they would like to know how to do this, so here it is:

First, you need to put a gauge setup together-here is mine:

Update 11/10/2013: KBOGH is now offering a ready to use gauge setup for sale: Ken's Bolt on Grab Hooks <<Hydraulics>>



You need a 0-3000 or 0-5000 PSI pressure gauge, (I prefer the Glycerin filled ones myself), it should have a 1/4" NPT male fitting on it, then a short piece of hose, and finally a male QD nipple that fits your tractor, this can be the most challenging part since there are so many types. I know they cost more-but I think it's best just to go to JD or a local hydraulic shop and get one, dealing with shipping and returns for the wrong one can be a PITA when ordering online.

Note: Please resist the temptation of using any regular plumbing fittings like from Home Depot or Lowe's. They are NOT rated for the pressure our systems can create. Only machined steel fittings rated for hydraulic use should be used.

Assemble the parts together using a sealant on the threads, a PTFE based paste is the best-but since this is just a gauge setup that will not be under pressure all the time almost anything can be used (read the label, it should mention that it's OK for use with hydraulic oils). Do NOT use Teflon Tape! Little bits can get into the system and foul spool valves and PRV's.


Now that we have our gauge, we can start testing. As stated in your Owners Manual 1000 times-Park on hard level ground, set the parking brake, chock the wheels, keep young children and small animals away, blah, blah, blah...

Step 1) Operate the machine a little to get the fluid close to normal operating temperature (ambient plus 100* or so is normal). Drive it around, use the loader, whatever just get the fluid warmed up.

Step 2) Plug the gauge into any available QD port. I used one of my rear remotes since my plow is still hooked up to the mid-SCV:



Step 3) Run the engine up to 2000 RPM's or so:



Step 4) Operate the lever to pressurize the port that the gauge is plugged into. You will hear the engine labor since you are "Deadheading" the system, no harm will be done for the few seconds it takes to get the reading. The reading on the gauge indicates the max system pressure, that is the setting of the PRV (Pressure Relief Valve). Most tractors nowadays are in the 2000 to 2500 range, but your owners manual will list this in the specifications section.



Clear as mud? Still confused? Maybe this little video will help:


Edit 11/14/13:
New video has been posted:

 

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Great post Kenny! :thumbup1gif:


Sent from my phone using Tapatalk.
 

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Thanks Kenny, definitely useful!:thumbup1gif:
 

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Thanks Kenny!!!! Very useful !

Along the same line, if I was to find mine low per specifications,what would I need to do on my 2520. I assume it would be to shim the relief valve. Where would the relief valve be on my tractor and what shims would I need? If mine turns out to be low, I know it would be best to take mine back to the dealer,but unfortunately,they are quite aways down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Kenny!!!! Very useful !

Along the same line, if I was to find mine low per specifications,what would I need to do on my 2520. I assume it would be to shim the relief valve. Where would the relief valve be on my tractor and what shims would I need? If mine turns out to be low, I know it would be best to take mine back to the dealer,but unfortunately,they are quite aways down the road.
This is where owning the FSM (factory service manual) helps. I cannot advise specifically to the 2520 since I don't have one. On my tractor no "shims" are needed since its a bolt/jamb nut setup on the PRV.
 

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Ken,
I was trying to find the relief valve for rgd. Not sure where to look,but it looks like it is on the main valve body. I came across this spec sheet. Is it stating that there is 4,500 psi in the drive circuit? That is some serious pressure.

JD doesn't make it easy to share any info do they.:nunu:

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Greg, those pressures are inside the hydrostat tranny, we will not see them doing our routine projects. But yes, it's all serious pressure and needs to be respected just the same. The PRV on my machine is located on the right side of the tranny case up over the axle.
 
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Thanks Greg! I appreciate your looking this up! I'm going to order that manual this week....I should of done it right after buying my machine.
 

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Helpfull thread......as for the 2520 series its good for the new owner to know exactly where they are right from the dealer.....
Most of the 2520/2720 series tend to be delivered above the stock spec of 2415 psi, some are set lower and feedback is usually disappointing performance........ a nice sweet spot is in the 2650 psi area (or less if you choose).... it provides you significant gains without destroying your system or machine......just an observation over the years.. :)
 

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Kenny, I realize you don't have a 1-series, but do you think I could just get the gauge and thread it right into the appropriate qd fitting (adapting if necessary), doing w/o the swivel and hose. Having someone monitor the gauge if I can't see it from the control lever. Just want to check my pressure w/o spending any more than necessary.
 

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Kenny, I realize you don't have a 1-series, but do you think I could just get the gauge and thread it right into the appropriate qd fitting (adapting if necessary), doing w/o the swivel and hose. Having someone monitor the gauge if I can't see it from the control lever. Just want to check my pressure w/o spending any more than necessary.
That would work just fine.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Kenny, I realize you don't have a 1-series, but do you think I could just get the gauge and thread it right into the appropriate qd fitting (adapting if necessary), doing w/o the swivel and hose. Having someone monitor the gauge if I can't see it from the control lever. Just want to check my pressure w/o spending any more than necessary.
Hose is the cheap part of the equation so you could get a long hose made so you can control the levers and check the gauge.

http://www.aux-hyd.com/cart/upload/index.php?route=product/product&path=64&product_id=63
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yup, it does not matter how you do it...but all the gauges have NPT ports so you will need some sort of adapter-the QD has ORB threads I think.
 
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Yup, it does not matter how you do it...but all the gauges have NPT ports so you will need some sort of adapter-the QD has ORB threads I think.
The QD's on the 318 and I would guess smaller tractors are MPT, I forget the model for them, Diesel jump in here I know you know what it is.
 

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The QD's on the 318 and I would guess smaller tractors are MPT, I forget the model for them, Diesel jump in here I know you know what it is.
You are 100% correct. All of the 1/4" QD'S I recently used are FNPT, not ORB. I would have preferred ORB, but thy weren't available. The QD'S are ISO-B 7241B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
OK...I sit corrected. The 1/4" Pioneer QD's on my 4110 are ORB's
 
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