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What are people using to fill in spots in their concrete floor that has been chip out. Got my first chip the other day :banghead:, about the size of a quarter and about double the thickness of a quarter in the center of the chipped spot. Yea I was upset but it was only a matter of time, and I am over it now.
 

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Most the large lumber yards sell small amounts of patch in a can similar to what you would see Spackle in. You will want something with a latex or polymer to help with adhesion.
 

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Most the large lumber yards sell small amounts of patch in a can similar to what you would see Spackle in. You will want something with a latex or polymer to help with adhesion.
Thanks. Anything at HD? The chip is rather shallow so I am concerned about what ever I put in will stay.
 

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Does Momma know or are you trying to hide it from her? :laugh:

sweep-under-rug.jpg
 

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Does Momma know or are you trying to hide it from her? :laugh:
She knows and said the same thing "all a matter of time". It is on her side of the garage though.:lol:
 

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Fill it with Deere green paint. I've found that stuff sticks to almost anything and is impervious to grease and oil.
 

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Since I own a rotary hammer capable of drilling up to 1-1/2" in diameter; I'd drill it out approximately 1/4 - 1/2 the thickness of the slab and use anchor bolt grout to fill the hole. Anchor bolt grout is strong, pourable depending on how much water you use, has low shrinkage, and is easy to work. Trying to fill something as shallow as you describe will probably be temporary at best. HD and Lowe's have anchor bolt grout, and you should be able rent a rotary hammer and bit if you don't have one.
 

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I'd drill it out approximately 1/4 - 1/2 the thickness of the slab and use anchor bolt grout to fill the hole. Anchor bolt grout is strong, pourable depending on how much water you use, has low shrinkage, and is easy to work.
Exactly what i was going to suggest.
 

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Since I own a rotary hammer capable of drilling up to 1-1/2" in diameter; I'd drill it out approximately 1/4 - 1/2 the thickness of the slab and use anchor bolt grout to fill the hole. Anchor bolt grout is strong, pourable depending on how much water you use, has low shrinkage, and is easy to work. Trying to fill something as shallow as you describe will probably be temporary at best. HD and Lowe's have anchor bolt grout, and you should be able rent a rotary hammer and bit if you don't have one.
Why does a garage floor need to be pristine? Mine has character!:drinks:
I own a rotary hammer drill but that may be going a little too far. I guess I was looking for the miracle quick fix. Couple weeks from now I probably won't care but with todays technology I thought there may be something out there that I was unaware of...and maybe there is. Thanks.
 

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That's why I put tile on my garage floor. Any damage just pop the tile out apply some thinset and put down a new tile.
Ceramic? Isn't that slippery? I would think vinyl would work well but you said thinset.


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You have a concrete floor under your Deere???? :laugh:

Seriously though, there are epoxy based self leveling products that work great as long as you make sure there is no loose material left in the spall. Depending what caused it, you might wait a year or so to see if you get more chips to repair and do a few at once. I once poured a slab for a shop and it got rained on before I finished, no amount of epoxy could fix that one.

For me now, the weeds and grass are buried with snow under my Little Green Girl so I don't notice if they are ok or not, :lol:
 

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Why does a garage floor need to be pristine? Mine has character!:drinks:
Mine has cracks.

I own a rotary hammer drill but that may be going a little too far. I guess I was looking for the miracle quick fix. Couple weeks from now I probably won't care but with todays technology I thought there may be something out there that I was unaware of...and maybe there is. Thanks.
Since you own a rotary hammer, drilling concrete is child's play. Just drill it, fill it, and be done with it.

Kenny, it is actually slate, was cheap, not slippery, sealed it so its water proof and looks awesome.
Pictures! We want pictures of this snazzy garage.
 

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You have a concrete floor under your Deere???? :laugh:

Seriously though, there are epoxy based self leveling products that work great as long as you make sure there is no loose material left in the spall. Depending what caused it, you might wait a year or so to see if you get more chips to repair and do a few at once. I once poured a slab for a shop and it got rained on before I finished, no amount of epoxy could fix that one.

For me now, the weeds and grass are buried with snow under my Little Green Girl so I don't notice if they are ok or not, :lol:
I think that is what I'll do, fill it with some Bondo or epoxy. My basement floor is riddled with chips I'll test there.
 

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I own a rotary hammer drill but that may be going a little too far. I guess I was looking for the miracle quick fix. Couple weeks from now I probably won't care but with todays technology I thought there may be something out there that I was unaware of...and maybe there is. Thanks.
They sell caulk for concrete,I used it to repair a crack in my steps several years ago and its held up well.The color matches well and it really seems to stick to the old concrete.For the cost of a tube its worth a shot.
 

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I did one better, I finally tore out and repoured the apron to the garage. When we got the first snow I hit the edge of the concrete with the scarifers on the box blade and knocked the edge off.:cray: I did get over it but it took time.:laugh:
 

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I drove a readymix truck 31+ years,most of my adult life and we always said if you dont want any cracks dont pour any concrete.I suggested the caulk because any cement product you put in that small of a hole is most likely to just fall apart and come back out.You could try an epoxy,it might work but I never tried it.What I suggested is just to disguise the hole and has a better chance of staying put,that and it will keep it from collecting crud and will help it from getting bigger.
 
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