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We see lots of questions and discussion here about tillers. I decided to summarize my thoughts on this topic in web post.

Everyone who has a tiller seems to love it, no matter the details, so this might be a waste of effort.

Choose the Right Tiller for Your Compact Tractor - Tractor Time with Tim

We have a video coming out later today on the same topic. I'll post it here when it goes live @3pm. (Christy is still working through the details :) )

If you see anything I have missed, please let me know. I forgot the 'reverse rotation' discussion in the video, but it is included in the website.
Also, I'm happy to include some different opinions in this piece, as it is intended to help potential tiller buyers to make a good decision.

There is no sponsorship in the video or post. Ideas and opinions are all my own (and some gathered from you guys)...and worth a few cents less than what you pay for them :laugh:

Tim
 

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Looking forward to your video...

Side question do you know why Tarter/Countryline keep telling people not to use the yellow unit but to buy the red one?

I have talked to people on here with 1025 and they said they had no issues at all with the yellow.

Thanks
:greentractorride:
 

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Side question do you know why Tarter/Countryline keep telling people not to use the yellow unit but to buy the red one?

I have talked to people on here with 1025 and they said they had no issues at all with the yellow.

Thanks
:greentractorride:
Do you mean the 'orange' one?
In the case of King Kutter, the 4' yellow one is 'offset'. This isn't perfect for sub-compact tractors,as it makes it harder to till out the left tire track. ...but like everything else, folks don't complain. They love whatever tiller they buy.
 

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Awesome topic, looking forward to the video!
 

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Side question do you know why Tarter/Countryline keep telling people not to use the yellow unit but to buy the red one?

I have talked to people on here with 1025 and they said they had no issues at all with the yellow.
The Tarter and Countyline equipment that is painted red is all designed for sub-compact tractors with Cat 0 3-point hitches.

Their yellow products are setup for machines with Cat 1 3-point hitches.

The red stuff also usually weighs less. (the 4' red tiller weighs 90 lbs less than the 4' yellow tiller.)

People get confused when you bring up the 1025R because it is a "sub compact" tractor so they assume it has a Cat 0 hitch. But it has a "limited" Cat 1 hitch. That's why people don't have any issues using the yellow equipment.

The Cat 0 hitches were used on some older Cub Cadet, Ingersoll and other "garden tractors". The old Kubota G series tractors had them too. But I don't know when the last time Deere made anything with a Cat 0 was. Even the 3-point hitch kit that is sold for the X700 machines is a Cat 1.
 

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Great write up Tim, and I agree with pretty much everything, even the shear bolt/slip clutch vs. 25 hp tractors. Or the way I see it, I put a slip clutch on my rotary cutter simply because they can be adjusted and I really don't believe a tractor with 18 pto hp has enough to snap a shear bolt. But it was a really good read for anyone interested in purchasing a tiller.:good2:
 
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The Tarter and Countyline equipment that is painted red is all designed for sub-compact tractors with Cat 0 3-point hitches.

Their yellow products are setup for machines with Cat 1 3-point hitches.

The red stuff also usually weighs less. (the 4' red tiller weighs 90 lbs less than the 4' yellow tiller.)

People get confused when you bring up the 1025R because it is a "sub compact" tractor so they assume it has a Cat 0 hitch. But it has a "limited" Cat 1 hitch. That's why people don't have any issues using the yellow equipment.

The Cat 0 hitches were used on some older Cub Cadet, Ingersoll and other "garden tractors". The old Kubota G series tractors had them too. But I don't know when the last time Deere made anything with a Cat 0 was. Even the 3-point hitch kit that is sold for the X700 machines is a Cat 1.
I've also found that the yellow County Line implements are quick hitch ready. :thumbup1gif:
 

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IMHO, talking about tillers without talking about soil tilth is like,,,
buying a car without wheels,,,

you can do it, but, most people really need wheels with a car,,

Tilth is the reason most farmers quit using a moldboard plow,, that plow destroys tilth
the rototiller is even more destructive of tilth,,

The rototiller can be great, if used correctly.
My next door neighbor purchased a Kubota, and his package included a tiller.

He tilled his garden plot a half dozen times before planting,,
after just two or three years of that, the soil literally looked like a brick when it dried.

That was over a decade ago, the spot still will not even grow grass.
Before he got that tiller, he had a garden in that spot.
The only tilling was done with a Mantis tiller,, and he had a nice garden.

Someday I may buy a tiller due to my age,,
but, if I do own one,, it will be used minimally,,tilth is too important,,,:flag_of_truce:

Rant over!! :laugh:
 

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IMHO, talking about tillers without talking about soil tilth is like,,,
buying a car without wheels,,,

you can do it, but, most people really need wheels with a car,,

Tilth is the reason most farmers quit using a moldboard plow,, that plow destroys tilth
the rototiller is even more destructive of tilth,,

The rototiller can be great, if used correctly.
My next door neighbor purchased a Kubota, and his package included a tiller.

He tilled his garden plot a half dozen times before planting,,
after just two or three years of that, the soil literally looked like a brick when it dried.

That was over a decade ago, the spot still will not even grow grass.
Before he got that tiller, he had a garden in that spot.
The only tilling was done with a Mantis tiller,, and he had a nice garden.

Someday I may buy a tiller due to my age,,
but, if I do own one,, it will be used minimally,,tilth is too important,,,:flag_of_truce:

Rant over!! :laugh:
I can attest to a tilth issue though not related to tillers - I’ve seen it first hand.

When I was an equipment operator instructor for the state we had a Gradall field. Day after day - week after week - year after year we had the Gradalls digging in the same spots. The soil became absolute soup when wet and like a brick when dry. The students couldn’t learn anything properly because of this.

When we suggested to the big wheels that we needed new dirt brought in they thought we were nuts.

So yes - over tilling or digging can cause a big problem - one you certainly don’t want for a vegetable garden.
 

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tilth okay I bite can you explain what this?

IMHO, talking about tillers without talking about soil tilth is like,,,
buying a car without wheels,,,

you can do it, but, most people really need wheels with a car,,

Tilth is the reason most farmers quit using a moldboard plow,, that plow destroys tilth
the rototiller is even more destructive of tilth,,

The rototiller can be great, if used correctly.
My next door neighbor purchased a Kubota, and his package included a tiller.

He tilled his garden plot a half dozen times before planting,,
after just two or three years of that, the soil literally looked like a brick when it dried.

That was over a decade ago, the spot still will not even grow grass.
Before he got that tiller, he had a garden in that spot.
The only tilling was done with a Mantis tiller,, and he had a nice garden.

Someday I may buy a tiller due to my age,,
but, if I do own one,, it will be used minimally,,tilth is too important,,,:flag_of_truce:

Rant over!! :laugh:
tilth oh boy another term I know nothing about. (lots of others also)

No one seems eager to ask as they are embarrassed but I'm not. What the hell is " tilth" before I use my new tiller!!!!!

Thank you !!!:dunno:

PS reading this board keeps showing me how much I don't know about what to know.
 

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tilth oh boy another term I know nothing about. (lots of others also)

No one seems eager to ask as they are embarrassed but I'm not. What the hell is " tilth" before I use my new tiller!!!!!

Thank you !!!:dunno:

PS reading this board keeps showing me how much I don't know about what to know.
We've never used that fancy work "tilth", what I see from tilling or moldboard plowing is that you will get a compaction layer directly underneath after years of turning the same depth. This will not allow for water to pass through. When is rains the water just lays on the compacted layer creating mud of the tilled soil, or when it is dry the tilled soil cannot draw moisture from underneath creating dry crumbly soil. This is where chisel plows come in, you have to break up that layer of compaction aka, vertical tillage. Something like that, I'm far from a soil expert but I do understand compaction and the need to break it up..
 

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They should include this site in your machine package when you buy a tractor lol.

We've never used that fancy work "tilth", what I see from tilling or moldboard plowing is that you will get a compaction layer directly underneath after years of turning the same depth. This will not allow for water to pass through. When is rains the water just lays on the compacted layer creating mud of the tilled soil, or when it is dry the tilled soil cannot draw moisture from underneath creating dry crumbly soil. This is where chisel plows come in, you have to break up that layer of compaction aka, vertical tillage. Something like that, I'm far from a soil expert but I do understand compaction and the need to break it up..

Thanks that helps a lot.
:bigthumb:
 

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I started with 1", or less, of topsoil over solid clay and rock. A tiller is a necessity for me to incorporate organic matter into the garden plot and after 6 years it's starting to come along. I run the subsoiler through it then till in compost and what ever else I can find that will break down and aerate the soil.

I selected my Collari 48" tiller because it was $400 on Craigslist. :laugh: I'd like to have something wider to cover the rear wheels, but I can live with what I have for my 1000 sqft garden and other occasional tilling duties.
 

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tiller

tilth oh boy another term I know nothing about. (lots of others also)

No one seems eager to ask as they are embarrassed but I'm not. What the hell is " tilth" before I use my new tiller!!!!!

Thank you !!!:dunno:

PS reading this board keeps showing me how much I don't know about what to know.
My go to when I don't want to ask is good old wikipedia - It never judges....

Soil tilth is its physical condition, especially in relation to its suitability for planting or growing a crop. Factors that determine tilth include the formation and stability of aggregated soil particles, moisture content, degree of aeration, rate of water infiltration and drainage. Tilth can change rapidly, depending on environmental factors such as changes in moisture, tillage and soil amendments.[1]

Soil with good tilth has large pore spaces for air infiltration and water movement. Roots only grow where the soil tilth allows for adequate levels of soil oxygen. Such soil also holds a reasonable supply of water and nutrients.[2]

Tillage, organic matter amendments, fertilization and irrigation can each improve tilth, but when used excessively, can have the opposite effect.[2] Crop rotation and cover crops can positively impact tilth. A combined approach can produce the greatest improvement.

The guys that farm the few hundred acres around me rarely till or plow, they just rotate their crops. This probably helps minimize erosion and loss of top soil as well as to maintain a good tilth factor. I learned about soil substructure *after* I bought a tiller, or I would have never bought it. My interpretation of what I have read is that if you have good soil structure and composition, you don't want to damage it with a tiller. On the other hand, if your soil is of poor quality, I guess that you might be able to improve it by tilling in organic matter and soil amendments. I am lucky to have very good soil.

Anybody interested in a brand new, never been used JD 647 tiller?
 

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Thanks that helps a lot.
:bigthumb:
Yes, well chisel plows aren't something really designed for small tractors, I have the benefit of still having some of the larger equipment from the farm. I am itching to try out my homemade chisel plows on my 2025 later in the spring just to see how it will handle them. Where the biggest problem comes in is in the root of whatever you have planted, the roots cannot penetrate through the compacted layer and grow horizontally, not good for growth......
 

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The Tarter and Countyline equipment that is painted red is all designed for sub-compact tractors with Cat 0 3-point hitches.

Their yellow products are setup for machines with Cat 1 3-point hitches.

The red stuff also usually weighs less. (the 4' red tiller weighs 90 lbs less than the 4' yellow tiller.)

People get confused when you bring up the 1025R because it is a "sub compact" tractor so they assume it has a Cat 0 hitch. But it has a "limited" Cat 1 hitch. That's why people don't have any issues using the yellow equipment.

The Cat 0 hitches were used on some older Cub Cadet, Ingersoll and other "garden tractors". The old Kubota G series tractors had them too. But I don't know when the last time Deere made anything with a Cat 0 was. Even the 3-point hitch kit that is sold for the X700 machines is a Cat 1.
X465 thru X495 X575 thru X595 & X700 thru the Current X700 signature series You Can get either a Limited Cat 1 3point Hitch or a Cat 0 3point Hitch
as shown in the two Links Below

3-point hitch (Category 0)

Category 1 3-point hitch

BM17327 is the Cat 0 3point hitch

BM23882 is the Limited Cat 1 3 point hitch

Either Hitch has Been available since the X465 thru X595 Came Out and continues to be available for the signature Series. I honestly don't Know why Deere still makes the Cat 0 considering the Biggest Cat 0 Implement Maker Brinly & Hardy has Not Made Cat 0 implements since about 2005

Cub Cadet 3000 series Took a Cat 0 Until it ceased Production at the end of 2011

Ingersoll took a Cat 0 through supposedly a Limited Cat 1 was available the Last few years of Eastmans Production of the Ingersoll Just before Production ceased

You Can still get the 42inch Hydraulic tiller with Cat 0 spacing from Deere if You really want it

Some of the aftermarket equipment for ATV's are still available In Cat 0

A company called Tuff-Bilt https://www.tuff-bilt.com/ still makes Cat 0 for there Tractor Based on the Allis G design

:bigthumb:
 

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Never a bad tiller? When is too cheap a reason for concern?

Great video, thanks!

I've just upgrade to an x739 and have been researching tillers. Was looking at the Country Line 48". Just missed the 15% off sale at Tractor Supply the other day, plus I can drive down to Delaware and save tax, a win win.

I've just run across another company out of New Jersey. 3 Point Tiller that sells the Cosmo brand. They have a UL48 model for $1,399 shipping included or you can pick it up and save another $200 (but then pay a little tax). Anyone have any experience with Cosmo? I know you said you can't really go wrong with any tiller but when the price gets too good you have to raise and eyebrow; that's where forums like this come into play, who's got one?

https://www.3pointtiller.com/3-point-tillers

Just looked at the manual and they are made in India; not a good thing, but not a bad thing, just today's reality.
 

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Something new I learned last night is the Tractor Supply tiller in yellow is "Reversible". You flip the tiller cutting bar and the main gearbox over and now it's reverse rotation. Check out the video and instructions on their website.

-636
 

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Something new I learned last night is the Tractor Supply tiller in yellow is "Reversible". You flip the tiller cutting bar and the main gearbox over and now it's reverse rotation. Check out the video and instructions on their website.

-636
Did not know that, thanks for the info. :good2:
 
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