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Backstory:

Some guys were asking about my review of the 66" CTA plow that I picked up to replace the 54" plow that recently received the Superior-Tech 9" extensions. Needless to say the 54 with the extensions had some fitment issues. I hated how the scrapper edges didn't match in height or thickness, nor do they make a squeegee for extensions, and JD only makes a 54" in length one.The radius on the extensions and plow weren't perfect either. As many know I sold my used 54" that had extensions installed for less than 48hrs to a guy that needed the plow only.

I started my quest to decide as to whether I wanted the 54" snowblower or the CTA 66" plow. I spoke to many guys as well as dealers and settled on the 66" plow. Jeff at CTA was extremely personable and easy to work with.


Arrival:

My (CTA) Compact Tractor Attachments 66” plow with the UHMW cutting edge showed up today for my X758.

The blade is packed in a wood 2x6 crate with 5 of the sides shielded, along with foam padding on the bottom to protect the powder coat finish. On top there are a couple more 2x6's locking the whole thing tightly together. Torx screws hold the whole thing together and after removing the two blocks on the back you can lift the blade out. I personally stood the whole thing up into working orientation and then lifted it out. I'm still younger than many of you so no back problems lifting the 300lbs plow out of the crate. :laugh:

This thing is built like a tank. Both large springs are tension adjustable and beefy.. The skid shoes are oversized and from a commercial grade truck plow. CTA included many washers so you could adjust the height to your own preference and as the scrapper edge wears. All the hardware is large, oversized and SS, nothing like that on the OEM 54” plow. I opted for the UHMW edge over the hardox 500 edge to protect my driveway. I still might change it over to a squeegee from rubberwearqstrips.com since I hate punch holes in rubber. :laugh: I have yet to decide if I will be adding a top flat however the plow already has the holes drilled for it. I brought the X758 over, pitched the QH down, drove forward and pitched the QH up. I was able to cleanly lift the blade off the ground and get it hitched up. Due to the 54" plow being shorter in height, the mounting flanges were lower to the ground. I was not able to hookup the 54" without getting off the tractor and lifting the plow up onto the QH mount. It was slightly annoying.

Overall I am extremely happy with the design, the sturdiness, and the attention to detail that was put into the plow. Hell even the laser cut initials of CTA that are welded onto the back of plow. I'm glad I purchased this attachment and look forward to my first snowstorm with it.

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Discussion Starter #4
Looks good, only 1 flaw in your plan. No :snow:. :lol:

Let us know how it works when you get to try it out.
I KNOW!!! Man I'm sure hoping that the cold snap coming through in the 2nd-3rd week of January brings moisture our way. I'll be heart broken if I don't get to try this thing out this winter.
 

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I have had the 60" CTA blade on my 1025R this is the third season. Its a great blade. Looks like new and the skid shoes are really monsterous.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Well we finally got a decent snowfall here in CT. Went to bed at midnight and had a light 1" covering. Woke up at 8am and found the snow had stopped and had dumped roughly 1' on the ground. I was finally going to get my chance to really test the X758 and my new CTA 66" plow. This is only my 4th time plowing ever so i'm very much a noob and learning as I go (by doing and reading).

One thing I definitely learned is due to the lack of weight of the tractor momentum is key. Secondly, make sure your lawn and brush line are below the grade of your driveway and paved surfaces otherwise you'll tear them up (if you're lucky) at best, at worst they trip the blade.

Clearing out my main parking area was cake. With a little momentum and feathering of the blade as I approached the lawn I could keep from having the blade dig in. With a slight angle to the blade and taking roughly 2/3 bites of the snow I could prevent it from scooting around the side of the blade. This made for less cleanup and second passes as well as allowing the tractor to still track straight.

Once It was time to hit my long driveway entrance, roughly 600', I knew I was going to break a sweat. I tried to make a single pass with a straight blade down the center, I made it roughly 1/3 of the way before I just lost all momentum and started to bog the engine. I pushed the large pile to the left and right and was ready to give it another shot when I decided maybe I'm better off angling to a 45 and trying to push half one way and then a second path the opposite. I barely made it 50' before the weight of the snow weighed my machine and was guiding the front end of the tractor off the path I intended. It was at that time I realized angling the blade was only going to work well if there was less snow or i was doing clean up passes. I then started the long daunting task of using a straight blade, angling the tractor at a 45deg angle to the driveway and pushing the snow off the side and back 8-10'. 600' / 66" = a lot of passes to clear the snow off the driveway and get it back far enough for the next snowfall.

When it was all said and done I realized there's definitely a need to have a snowblower due to the length of the driveway and how close the brush line is to the side of my driveway. I honestly don't know how much property I have on the left and right side past the pavement. When we first moved in I did spend a few hours with my old yellow 54" blade and lopping shears and cleared 2-6' back on each side. I liked the idea of not going too far back to give additional privacy and a tunnel effect. I also didn't have a loader and my chainsaw was in the shop :laugh: Going into the fall of 2019 I predict I will spend more time pushing back the brush on both sides, taking out some of the roots/stumps, I'll also do some grading on both sides so the grass and dirt are below the pavement height. I'll continue to keep an eye out for a used and reasonably priced 54" blower until I can someday afford a 2 series with a 3pt blower.

BTW the UHMW edge that came on the plow has been great. The only down fall is I have two 1-2" deep ruts in my driveway from 10yrs of use and settling that has made it a little more challenging to clear the entire surface. The rubber edge is probably better suited from me until I have a topcoat applied to level everything out again. :gizmo:


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That’s a huge plow for a lawn & garden tractor - no wonder you had issues pushing a foot of wet snow.

With the 54” that is designed for that tractor you likely would have been fine with your first attack. But you found a way and got it done!
 

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Until this year I plowed with an X728 with the JD 54” plow. With a foot of heavy wet snow you need the back weight bracket and at least 4 42 lb. weights. Weights will make a huge difference and negates the need for a snowthrower in my opinion. I had to plow my neighbors last year because their snowblowers couldn’t move a foot of heavy wet snow without frequently clogging up. With the 66” angled all the way does it drag on the ground? The minimum amount of lift height makes it difficult to carry the plow angled.

I would suggest that when you plow you plow down each side of the driveway first before plowing the middle. By doing this you don’t have to push the middle snow and edge snow at the same time making it easier to move the snow from the middle all the way to the edge. You have some room to push the middle snow over.

I too have the 66” CTA plow but it is the FEL mounted plow on a 1025r. The X728 was actually easier to plow with because it was shorter and has a lower center of gravity than the 1025r with a Mauser cab. Currently I have 8 suitcase weights on the 3 point and if I had a foot of heavy wet snow I’d probably add another 100 lbs of lead shot.
 

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Hey, after you cleared the snow, you gained a dog!:laugh::lol:

I can tell by the look of the snow, it was about 28 to 33 degrees outside. Plus the ground is warm.

Make sure you read my response to the x738 that couldn't handle 9" of snow.......I break down the changes one needs to make and how to modify your approach to handle the snow.

I give you credit, you kept trying and persevered. Don't mistakenly think that you would have had any easier of a time with a blower with THAT type and amount of snow under THOSE conditions. You would have had blower chute plugging, discharge throwing distance problems and it's very tough to throw the same snow two or three times as each time you throw it, you compact it and make it even heavier and more dense. It would have been slow going, engine bogging, traction challenging snow blowing experience. That snow is the toughest snow to deal with.

Give your plow a few more snow falls before you move to a blower. Trust me, the snow conditions make a WORLD of difference and the conditions shown in your picture are tough. But, the good news is the conditions will only be worse when the snow you had is preceded with an ice storm......:dunno:

You can never straight blade wet snow down the center of the driveway, it simply accumulates too much snow in front of the blade. Pick up a shovel load of the snow and see just how excessively heavy it is compared to snow at lower temps. If you would have plowed off to one side of the driveway to give yourself a "working lane", then you would have been able to run with the blade angled and just taken smaller bites out of the pile. This allows you to plow end to end, instead of side to side, but your driveway is fairly narrow through the trees so either way worked out in the end.

Also, more weight on the back will help with pushing. That's a heavy blade and you found out first hand the disadvantage of a taller, wider, heavier blade in heavy wet snow. I would suggest (6) 42# suitcase weights and then having either 3 or 4 bags of sand at 70 to 80 pounds each or bags of snow melt at 50 pounds each to stack on top of the suitcase weights for these wet heavy snows. You won't need that much in more "normal" snow falls which are less wet. Then just set the extra weight off to the side until you need it.

I have no reason to mislead you about any of this. Don't make any long term decisions about your equipment based upon that snowfall.

Don't expect any remaining snow falls this year to be much different as late in the season as it is. But I am not kidding, using a 54" blower on that same snow would have been just as difficult, just perhaps with the complications being different. That type of snow puts a heavy load on the engine to run it through the blower. Yes, the blower can handle it, but it would be a lot of starting and stopping, backing up and moving back into the snow piles. The augers will compact the snow and the blower will fill up in front and the chute will be clearing with difficulty.

Bottom line, heavy wet snow is just tough to deal with. Fortunately, all snow isn't wet and heavy and for that, we can be thankful........

Give that CTA until the middle of next season before making any decisions. My opinion is one should have both a blade and a blower, especially if they don't have a front end loader bucket. It's a matter of using the right tool for the job and as the conditions change, the tool best suited to deal with the conditions also changes...........

Look at is this way, you could have spent a multiple of what you did for the CTA plow on the blower and front drive unit and had issues with the blower and the snow. I think many people think that plowing and blowing snow is simply "Point and Go". Its not. Conditions dictate adaptation. It's a lot like being married. You have to remain willing to adapt and change over time as "conditions and circumstances" change.:laugh::lol:

I am glad you posted your follow up when you got a chance to use the plow. Now, until the next time.....:good2:
 

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Until this year I plowed with an X728 with the JD 54” plow. With a foot of heavy wet snow you need the back weight bracket and at least 4 42 lb. weights. Weights will make a huge difference and negates the need for a snowthrower in my opinion. I had to plow my neighbors last year because their snowblowers couldn’t move a foot of heavy wet snow without frequently clogging up. With the 66” angled all the way does it drag on the ground? The minimum amount of lift height makes it difficult to carry the plow angled.

I would suggest that when you plow you plow down each side of the driveway first before plowing the middle. By doing this you don’t have to push the middle snow and edge snow at the same time making it easier to move the snow from the middle all the way to the edge. You have some room to push the middle snow over.

I too have the 66” CTA plow but it is the FEL mounted plow on a 1025r. The X728 was actually easier to plow with because it was shorter and has a lower center of gravity than the 1025r with a Mauser cab. Currently I have 8 suitcase weights on the 3 point and if I had a foot of heavy wet snow I’d probably add another 100 lbs of lead shot.
I doubt it touches the ground as the X7XX quick hitch is mounted higher on the machine than it is on the 1 series. He should still have a couple of inches of corner clearance when fully lifted and angled. Angled one direction is closer to the ground than the other as the angles are slightly different. I think angled right (if memory serves me) is closer to the road on the plow corner, but either way, he should be OK with clearance.
 
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I agree with the need for ballast on the rear of the 738. On my 1025R I have a CTA 60" on front and a Meyer salt spreader on the 3pt. I keep it filled with 200# of salt. works great for Ballast then when done I spread the salt and park it in garage. I refill the salt spreader for next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Until this year I plowed with an X728 with the JD 54” plow. With a foot of heavy wet snow you need the back weight bracket and at least 4 42 lb. weights. Weights will make a huge difference and negates the need for a snowthrower in my opinion. I had to plow my neighbors last year because their snowblowers couldn’t move a foot of heavy wet snow without frequently clogging up. With the 66” angled all the way does it drag on the ground? The minimum amount of lift height makes it difficult to carry the plow angled.

I would suggest that when you plow you plow down each side of the driveway first before plowing the middle. By doing this you don’t have to push the middle snow and edge snow at the same time making it easier to move the snow from the middle all the way to the edge. You have some room to push the middle snow over.

I too have the 66” CTA plow but it is the FEL mounted plow on a 1025r. The X728 was actually easier to plow with because it was shorter and has a lower center of gravity than the 1025r with a Mauser cab. Currently I have 8 suitcase weights on the 3 point and if I had a foot of heavy wet snow I’d probably add another 100 lbs of lead shot.
Split the driveway into thirds and plow the right third and then left third and then down the center correct? When plowing the sides you're saying to do it with an angled blade? Max angle or 1/2 angled?

Presently I have the clickngo bracket with (6) 42's on the back so I'm carrying 252lbs plus my 205lbs. I have considered making a clickngo that can hold some of the 70lb suitcase weights. It would be cheaper and easier to make the bracket than add a 3pt setup.

The other idea was to pickup one of the 2" receiver hitch mounted cargo carriers that they sell for SUVs and trucks. I have a 2" heavy hitch receiver and I can then slide cargo carrier into the receiver and toss bags of sand on the carrier. Downside is it's going to my my tractor another 3' longer. https://www.etrailer.com/Hitch-Cargo-Carrier/etrailer/E98874.html



Hey, after you cleared the snow, you gained a dog!:laugh::lol:

I can tell by the look of the snow, it was about 28 to 33 degrees outside. Plus the ground is warm.

Make sure you read my response to the x738 that couldn't handle 9" of snow.......I break down the changes one needs to make and how to modify your approach to handle the snow.

I give you credit, you kept trying and persevered. Don't mistakenly think that you would have had any easier of a time with a blower with THAT type and amount of snow under THOSE conditions. You would have had blower chute plugging, discharge throwing distance problems and it's very tough to throw the same snow two or three times as each time you throw it, you compact it and make it even heavier and more dense. It would have been slow going, engine bogging, traction challenging snow blowing experience. That snow is the toughest snow to deal with.

Give your plow a few more snow falls before you move to a blower. Trust me, the snow conditions make a WORLD of difference and the conditions shown in your picture are tough. But, the good news is the conditions will only be worse when the snow you had is preceded with an ice storm......:dunno:

You can never straight blade wet snow down the center of the driveway, it simply accumulates too much snow in front of the blade. Pick up a shovel load of the snow and see just how excessively heavy it is compared to snow at lower temps. If you would have plowed off to one side of the driveway to give yourself a "working lane", then you would have been able to run with the blade angled and just taken smaller bites out of the pile. This allows you to plow end to end, instead of side to side, but your driveway is fairly narrow through the trees so either way worked out in the end.

Also, more weight on the back will help with pushing. That's a heavy blade and you found out first hand the disadvantage of a taller, wider, heavier blade in heavy wet snow. I would suggest (6) 42# suitcase weights and then having either 3 or 4 bags of sand at 70 to 80 pounds each or bags of snow melt at 50 pounds each to stack on top of the suitcase weights for these wet heavy snows. You won't need that much in more "normal" snow falls which are less wet. Then just set the extra weight off to the side until you need it.

I have no reason to mislead you about any of this. Don't make any long term decisions about your equipment based upon that snowfall.

Don't expect any remaining snow falls this year to be much different as late in the season as it is. But I am not kidding, using a 54" blower on that same snow would have been just as difficult, just perhaps with the complications being different. That type of snow puts a heavy load on the engine to run it through the blower. Yes, the blower can handle it, but it would be a lot of starting and stopping, backing up and moving back into the snow piles. The augers will compact the snow and the blower will fill up in front and the chute will be clearing with difficulty.

Bottom line, heavy wet snow is just tough to deal with. Fortunately, all snow isn't wet and heavy and for that, we can be thankful........

Give that CTA until the middle of next season before making any decisions. My opinion is one should have both a blade and a blower, especially if they don't have a front end loader bucket. It's a matter of using the right tool for the job and as the conditions change, the tool best suited to deal with the conditions also changes...........

Look at is this way, you could have spent a multiple of what you did for the CTA plow on the blower and front drive unit and had issues with the blower and the snow. I think many people think that plowing and blowing snow is simply "Point and Go". Its not. Conditions dictate adaptation. It's a lot like being married. You have to remain willing to adapt and change over time as "conditions and circumstances" change.:laugh::lol:

I am glad you posted your follow up when you got a chance to use the plow. Now, until the next time.....:good2:
All great advice SB thank you. I'll read the other thread, I already had it sub'd but hadn't read it yet. You're right on the temps and the snowblower likely wouldn't have been happy either. My walk behind Ariens Pro that I sold would have been fine but probably not a 54" front mount. The blade is extremely heavy about 300lbs. I think extra counterweight might not be a bad idea. As I mentioned above to SportShot, I'll have to decide if it's strapping bags to the current weight bracket, making a new bracket for 70s, or adding a cargo tray with bags. I'm definitely not giving up on the plow yet and i agree that it's good to have both pieces of equipment based upon snow conditions. There is certainly a time and a place to have a blade, after plowing these last few storms I 100% agree.

The only thing I'm considering adding is the rubber edge again. The UHMW edge is awesome and doesn't trash the pavement, but it still lives snow behind when the driveway isn't perfectly smooth. It's amazing for hard pack, nothing is left un scraped.



I doubt it touches the ground as the X7XX quick hitch is mounted higher on the machine than it is on the 1 series. He should still have a couple of inches of corner clearance when fully lifted and angled. Angled one direction is closer to the ground than the other as the angles are slightly different. I think angled right (if memory serves me) is closer to the road on the plow corner, but either way, he should be OK with clearance.
I have no issues with traveling with the blade at full angle when raised all the way. There's more than enough clearance. I just took some rough measurements, keep in mind my UHMW edge does have some wear now that I've used it. I found at full up and full left (from the operators seat) that there's 2.25" of clearance to the edge and 3.75" to the bottom of the blade corner. I found at full up and full right (from the operators seat) that there's 2.5" of clearance to the edge and 4.5" to the bottom of the blade corner. Safe to say the green paint on the bottom corners is safe even if I wear out the entire UHMW scraping edge.


I agree with the need for ballast on the rear of the 738. On my 1025R I have a CTA 60" on front and a Meyer salt spreader on the 3pt. I keep it filled with 200# of salt. works great for Ballast then when done I spread the salt and park it in garage. I refill the salt spreader for next time.
Presently I have the clickngo bracket with (6) 42's on the back so I'm carrying 252lbs plus my 205lbs. I had another idea that I listed above as well for weight. I think that's really the greatest issue at hand. How did you like the spreader? Was it electric or pto? do you have a link? The JD one I heard throws salt under the seat, poor design. I'd love to add one, especially if it's electric.
 
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I think I might actually order a carrier like this and see if it fits. It would be a lot easier to slap 4-8 bags of sand on it and ratchet them down rather than trying to get them to sit on top of the rear clickngo bracket and the round suitcase weights.

https://www.etrailer.com/Hitch-Cargo-Carrier/MaxxTow/MT70108.html
 
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I think I might actually order a carrier like this and see if it fits. It would be a lot easier to slap 4-8 bags of sand on it and ratchet them down rather than trying to get them to sit on top of the rear clickngo bracket and the round suitcase weights.

https://www.etrailer.com/Hitch-Cargo-Carrier/MaxxTow/MT70108.html
I agree with the other guys suggesting more rear ballast. Another thing to consider would be plowing technique. You mentioned that when your plow is angled, as the snow accumulated, it would push your front end off to the side. To aid in avoiding this, do not use float mode. Raise the blade ever so slightly off the surface so that you are loading the front axle with the weight of the blade. This greatly improves steering control. Snowfalls of this sort are not an everyday occurrence, so you need to adjust to the current conditions.

Paying attention to your current conditions, adjusting ballast, plowing technique and seat time is all you need.
 

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A couple things to consider

My old JD 314 wasn't very heavy and I had a problem in deep snows where the tractor would shift sideways instead of the blade pushing the snow off to the side. I had all the rear ballast the 318 could hold, which was only about 170 lbs. Years later, after reading all the threads on snowblowers and the problems with snow sticking to the augur and other internal surfaces, I've often wondered if my 318 would have performed better if I had waxed the front of the blade or sprayed it with fluid film or silicon so that the snow could slide off more easily. It might be worth experimenting with it. Years later, I also wondered if putting chains on the front tires would have helped. The old 314 didn't have four wheel drive, but the chains might have limited the sideways slip when the angled blade met the deep snow.
 
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Not all the snows are the same so it is trial and error as to how much you can angle the plow. The weight of the plow and the depth and weight of the snow can be enough to make the plow move the tractor sideways because you have less resistance to move sideways with the available traction. Bascically your front tires loose steering traction because the load your pushing is more than the traction the steering tires can take. Less angle would probably be better in that case.

I wonder if you might be better off trying to remove some rear weight to transfer more weight to the steering axle. If the back tires are not losing traction but your front tires are and the plow and snow load is overcoming the available steering axle traction. Im not sure if you can achieve enough weight transfer by removing rear weight.

Making a pass down the sides first is better in heavy snow because if you start pushing the middle snow to the side means you have to move both the middle and edge snows at the same time.
 

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I agree with the other guys suggesting more rear ballast. Another thing to consider would be plowing technique. You mentioned that when your plow is angled, as the snow accumulated, it would push your front end off to the side. To aid in avoiding this, do not use float mode. Raise the blade ever so slightly off the surface so that you are loading the front axle with the weight of the blade. This greatly improves steering control. Snowfalls of this sort are not an everyday occurrence, so you need to adjust to the current conditions.

Paying attention to your current conditions, adjusting ballast, plowing technique and seat time is all you need.
I presently do not set my blade in float, I set it right at the surface height. Since I'm new I watch the blade lower, then watch to see if the front end lifts at all, if so i raise the blade slightly and let the front end come down and then just a little more bump up, to ensure the front end has the weight on it rather than the blade. I definitely agree with what you're saying about different snow conditions and volume only permit certain amount of angling before you have to change technique.


My old JD 314 wasn't very heavy and I had a problem in deep snows where the tractor would shift sideways instead of the blade pushing the snow off to the side. I had all the rear ballast the 318 could hold, which was only about 170 lbs. Years later, after reading all the threads on snowblowers and the problems with snow sticking to the augur and other internal surfaces, I've often wondered if my 318 would have performed better if I had waxed the front of the blade or sprayed it with fluid film or silicon so that the snow could slide off more easily. It might be worth experimenting with it. Years later, I also wondered if putting chains on the front tires would have helped. The old 314 didn't have four wheel drive, but the chains might have limited the sideways slip when the angled blade met the deep snow.
I have fluid film and I can certainly try that. It worked great for my on my Ariens walk behind blower. The snow doesn't stick to the blade per se, but maybe it's not sliding across it laterally well?

The one thing I do know is that it has the perfect radius to it from the bottom to the top. I was able to watch the snow come up the blade and then fold back over forward just like a DOT plow truck. I was very impressed that it did that without a top flap.

Not all the snows are the same so it is trial and error as to how much you can angle the plow. The weight of the plow and the depth and weight of the snow can be enough to make the plow move the tractor sideways because you have less resistance to move sideways with the available traction. Bascically your front tires loose steering traction because the load your pushing is more than the traction the steering tires can take. Less angle would probably be better in that case.

I wonder if you might be better off trying to remove some rear weight to transfer more weight to the steering axle. If the back tires are not losing traction but your front tires are and the plow and snow load is overcoming the available steering axle traction. Im not sure if you can achieve enough weight transfer by removing rear weight.

Making a pass down the sides first is better in heavy snow because if you start pushing the middle snow to the side means you have to move both the middle and edge snows at the same time.
I definitely agree with what you're saying about different snow conditions and volume only permit certain amount of angling before you have to change technique. As i was hitting different parts of the driveway i was playing with the angle to see how much I could get away with before the weight of the snow pushed me rather than my machine pushing the snow. It's a lot of feel and practice, I didn't realize something so simple had so much technique. :laugh:

Interest thought about removing rear weight...I could try it....My back tires with the (6) 42lb weights never slipped. When the snow built up and the front wheels began to turn due to the 4wd kicking in they rarely slipped as well...the mass of the snow just wouldn't budge as easily as the front end of the machine. Only when I lost momentum or pushed a load square did I see the fronts wheels slip.
 

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Nastorino,

You have a very capable machine in the X758, but weighing in at a just little over 1050lb, weight becomes even more of a friend. The CTA is a lot of weight on the front of your machine, so I would hang as many suitcase weights on the rear that your clickngo bracket will handle. It sounds like you understand how to load your front axle and it's effect on steering, so enough said about that. Your machine will never run out of power.

I plowed for 29 years with a JD GT430/2WD/AG tires and handled anything that was thrown at it.

Stay the course, add some more weight and practice, practice, practice. Weight and more seat time.

You have one hell of a machine. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Nastorino,

You have a very capable machine in the X758, but weighing in at a just little over 1050lb, weight becomes even more of a friend. The CTA is a lot of weight on the front of your machine, so I would hang as many suitcase weights on the rear that your clickngo bracket will handle. It sounds like you understand how to load your front axle and it's effect on steering, so enough said about that. Your machine will never run out of power.

I plowed for 29 years with a JD GT430/2WD/AG tires and handled anything that was thrown at it.

Stay the course, add some more weight and practice, practice, practice. Weight and more seat time.

You have one hell of a machine. :thumbup1gif:
Hey JD,

You get so little snow that you have to practice on your grass? :lolol: Dedication
 
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