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I love my 1023e with the 54" snowblower. I only wish I either had a blacktop or concrete driveway because of picking up stones while snow blowing! I know that there are members from all over the country and in Canada and other areas. I live in central NY and get freezing, thawing temps. My question to all of you knowledgeable people what is better Blacktop or Concrete? Blacktop requires maintenance (coating) where concrete seems to be more maintenance free. I have a fairly large driveway approx. 30' x 100' and another area for 5th wheel that is 20' x 60. I'm liking the idea of concrete but I think the cost is much more than blacktop. Just wanting opinions. Thanks :dunno:
 

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Concrete is definitely more durable, if it is installed properly, but is also much more expensive to install. Also, if you do concrete, do it in sections and be sure to put drainage stone under it, put wire mesh or rebar in it, and keep it covered while it cures.

Blacktop is much more economical, can be patched easily, is pretty durable, and is much easier to put down. That said, yes you do have to seal it every few years but it really does last pretty long.

It really depends on your budget as to which you want to do.
 

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I have had both concrete & asphalt. I prefer asphalt. Concrete is not maintenance free. It may be for a few years, but when it starts going bad any repairs will stand out like a sore thumb.
Concrete will settle if the base is not done correctly. Concrete will crack. Some ice melt will cause the top surface of the concrete to pop off. Stains can also be a problem with concrete.

Asphalt can be easily repaired, re-coated & it will look like new.
 

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I have blacktop, over 35 years old and it's showing its age. Worse part of asphalt, and probably concrete too, is that if not installed correctly will definitely show in a few years. My parents (now my brother's house) has concrete. I think much less maintenance over the years, but cracking and shifting does show up too over many years.

The problem with my asphalt was (I believe) improper base and way too thin. It's the driveway that the builders put in when the house was built. I think the asphalt is only about 3 inches thick, and the driveway is quite wavy now and lots of cracks. Some area of the driveway also seem to be "hollow" underneath due to the sand base shifting. Sealing every few years helps, but that is also a bunch of work.

If I had the money and/or time, my dream driveway would be pavers like Unilock. But then my driveway is only about 25 ft X 40 ft, so it's not too big of an area to cover. Second choice would be concrete, not as hot in the summer and no softening under the noon day sun.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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You might also contact your local county tax assessor, here in mid-MO they valuate gravel, asphalt and concrete(most $$$) differently.
 

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Concrete every time.
As stated above, the base and installation is the key to a quality long lasting product.

Asphalt is not the best choice for a parking pad when stationary wheeled vehicles will be stored. Won't take many warm summer days to leave divots.
 

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I agree with several other statements, obviously you can figure out the difference in cost yourself, a good base is the secret to either one.
 

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You might also contact your local county tax assessor, here in mid-MO they valuate gravel, asphalt and concrete(most $$$) differently.
In NY, there is no additional property tax on a blacktop driveway. Short answer-Its not real property if it can be picked up & moved or removed. Sounds crazy but its correct at least until four years ago.
 

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I had blacktop on my first two houses and concrete on my last. As mentioned there is some maintenance with asphalt. Its not a huge deal but does take time and some expense to patch and seal it. I prefer the concrete in my situation as we have some larger equipment that would leave marks and divots in asphalt in hot weather. I even had a motorcycle tip as the kickstand sunk into the ground (dumb mistake on my part).Now I have concrete and so far it is holding up well to the traffic but time will tell.

Part of the drive is gravel and I understand the annoyance of stone ending up in the grass. I use a blade on the back of the tractor facing backwards to avoid digging in as I have found that is the best solution so far.
 

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I know it wasn’t on your list but you might want to look at tar and chip as well. If done right it will last a long time. My dads driveway went 20 some odd years with no maintenance. We just set the skids o. He blower for about a 1/4” clearance. Throwing stones wasn’t a concern.

We are thinking’s our having our driveway done and I’m really thinking this will be what we do.


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I love my 1023e with the 54" snowblower. I only wish I either had a blacktop or concrete driveway because of picking up stones while snow blowing! I know that there are members from all over the country and in Canada and other areas. I live in central NY and get freezing, thawing temps. My question to all of you knowledgeable people what is better Blacktop or Concrete? Blacktop requires maintenance (coating) where concrete seems to be more maintenance free. I have a fairly large driveway approx. 30' x 100' and another area for 5th wheel that is 20' x 60. I'm liking the idea of concrete but I think the cost is much more than blacktop. Just wanting opinions. Thanks :dunno:
In NY, I lived in the lower Hudson valley. I had a 12' x 325' long driveway. Never a problem-BUT I had it installed by a quality company. I had four inches of stone dust & gravel, graded with a highway grader, then steam rolled. Followed by three inches of blacktop installed by a blacktop machine & steam rolled. Driveway was twenty years old when I left NY four years ago. I had to surface seal it only one time. The key to blacktop is : Hire a quality professional company & not some bogus company selling leftover from the last job, or someone who does not have the proper equipment.

The big advantage with it in NY was that after I plowed it off, as soon as the sun came out I had a black, clean driveway.
Most of the problems with blacktop start with an uninformed home owner or a cheap homeowner not willing to pay for quality. The prep is 90% of the job. Anyone can sell you blacktop. Its all in the prep.

Blacktop thickness. All the low end guys offer two inches (which ends up being a lot less with the low ballers) thickness. The reason they all sell you two inches is because their equipment is not adequate to lay down anything thicker. Like I said, I used a professional highway-parking lot company that could go a full four inches thick. They told me for my use, three inches would be just fine. And that's what I got, a full three inches.

Also you should bring out the base material a little wider than the blacktop. That helps to prevent the edges from cracking.
And you never want to put any rock salt or chemicals on blacktop. Salt will eat it & a lot oc the chemicals are not made for blacktop use. I an giving you the benefit of my experience with this material.
 

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I have blacktop and love it.I had stone for 20 years and had it paved this summer.I have a good base as I added stone over the years as it compacted.I told te contractor I wanted a good base so if a truck pulled in it wouldn't fall apart.They did 3" of binder and 1" top (county top or F 7 top).Nice clearing the snow off driveway and not have to deal with stones.
 

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I have blacktop and love it.I had stone for 20 years and had it paved this summer.I have a good base as I added stone over the years as it compacted.I told te contractor I wanted a good base so if a truck pulled in it wouldn't fall apart.They did 3" of binder and 1" top (county top or F 7 top).Nice clearing the snow off driveway and not have to deal with stones.
I did the same thing back in October. Sure was nice plowing it this year - and Sweetie loves not getting dust/mud on her car. But I do kind of miss the charm of the gravel driveway.

Before (September). Yeah, it could have used some attention from a box blade or a land plane.
20180925_122605_resized_1.jpg

After (October). Actually, this was a "during" the paving process pic.
20181005_150016_resized.jpg

The weekend of January 13... After plowing...
20190113_143502_resized.jpg
 

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Concrete verses asphalt, hands down concrete. The asphalt is easier and cheaper to install and then requires much more maintenance nearly annually and after about 20 or 25 years, will likely have to be replaced again. Concrete is an investment, but one clearly worth the money in my opinion. I also don't like plowing snow on asphalt as compared to concrete as the traction is very different. It's easier to tear up the blacktop with tire chains, edge tamers, etc. verses concrete.

Make sure the base is prepared correctly, and compacted. The base is the difference between a driveway which lasts and one which doesn't. If there are any drainage issues, deal with them before the driveway is installed and deal with them properly.

I own a concrete driveway I installed it right. After nearly 25 years, we have a couple of cracks on the edge, but not enough to worry about or even require any repair effort. If you are parking heavier vehicles on it like your 5th wheel, I would have it 6" thick and I would also have it reinforced. Also, I would NOT get talked into pouring it in cold weather as they add more calcium chloride to help the concrete cure and it tends to make the concrete surface more fragile and it can crack or chip easier.

Make sure if they pour your driveway 6" thick, they use reinforcing rods. They used to use steel re rod and it was labor intensive as the re rod was heavy and time consuming to set and tie. Now, some companies are using a plastic composite rod which is much easier, faster and lighter to work with and cuts down on the labor by as much as a day depending upon the crew size and the driveway project. I wouldn't hesitate to have this done if I were pouring a new driveway.

=================================================================================================================

Here is something to remember regardless of the driveway surface you have installed. Have the installer put 3" or 4" PVC pipes across under your driveway extending past the pavement about 12" on each side. So, if your driveway is 12' wide, have them install 14' of PVC under it from side to side. It is under the full thickness of the concrete so the driveway thickness is uniform.

Slide a cap on each end just to keep water and dirt out of the pipe. Don't secure the ends, just slide them on and leave it as a short cut or access point in the future from one side of your driveway to the other. Put in a few of them, two of them near the road and maybe one every 50' to the main parking area. That way, if you have to have any utility or irrigation work done, you can simply dig up the ends of the PVC, take the caps off the end of the PVC and shove the wires or conduit or poly pipe under the driveway and not have to cut it or go around the driveway. :good2:

Things like driveway lights, utility lines, electrical conduit, driveway sensor wires, cable connections, poly pipe for sprinkler heads, all kinds of things that can be run through the pipe and its far easier.

I did this to my driveway (Also do it above all finished ceilings in lower levels of homes as it makes pushing and pulling wires SO MUCH easier than fish tape, especially if the utility panels are in an area with finished walls) and when I needed to have my cable connection for the modem replaced, I got home as the guy was stringing the cable. He was going to go around my driveway and parking area and the entire rear of the house to get to the other end. His way was 800 feet of cable. My way, using the tube, it was 150 feet going under the driveway. Makes future work like this so much easier. Also if your lawn develops drain problems, it's an ideal way to get the water to the other side if that's where you want it......

If you never use the tubes, oh well, you spent a little money on PVC pipes. But chances are something will come up and this will make getting under your driveway super easy. It's a small investment to make some future work easier and less expensive and prevents having to cut the driveway or tear it up to get something under the pavement. Hey, you can use it to cache gold bars or ammo magazines for the coming zombie Apocalypse, you never know how it may come in handy......:laugh:

:bigthumb:
 

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I love my 1023e with the 54" snowblower. I only wish I either had a blacktop or concrete driveway because of picking up stones while snow blowing! I know that there are members from all over the country and in Canada and other areas. I live in central NY and get freezing, thawing temps. My question to all of you knowledgeable people what is better Blacktop or Concrete? Blacktop requires maintenance (coating) where concrete seems to be more maintenance free. I have a fairly large driveway approx. 30' x 100' and another area for 5th wheel that is 20' x 60. I'm liking the idea of concrete but I think the cost is much more than blacktop. Just wanting opinions. Thanks :dunno:
I Like Concrete Had Gravel for Years at My rental House In NY except for about a 6 car Pad that was concrete. Retired from the Army in 2002 Moved Back to IL Had Asphalt Until 2012 Then went to concrete Best Investment It was reinforced and Had a Big Crack after the first winter In One section. But since It was reinforced held together just fine I think the crack was do to Not enough Base Under it as it was going Up hill. Anyways Moved to a New House in 2016. The Previous owner had a Road Construction company and it Is a road Grade Asphalt driveway The asphalt is about 1 foot thick if Not thicker and has Flat Concrete Curb that is also about a foot thick. Except no Curb going Back to the Barn.

But the driveway will support a Fully Loaded Concrete Mixer which would Probably do damage to a standard 3inch thick Asphalt driveway.

If I could afford it I would do a Interstate road Grade reinforced Concrete Driveway which is probably about 22inches Thick which includes a 6inch gravel base with a 4inch Asphalt Cap Followed By Road Grade rebar and concrete about a Foot thick Because for a driveway it would Probably never Need replacing in my youngest sons Life Time either.

But for reality a 4 to 6inch reinforced slab would Probably last a Good 20 to 25 Years or Longer Before You Need to do any major Maintenance on it as Long as It Pored right.

Thing I Like about concrete Really cleans Up well with a Front Blade and a rubber squeegee. But asphalt does heat Up Better In the winter when it sunny out for getting rid of the spots of snow that turned to Ice because you drove On it before you plowed. That said I hate that I now Have to seal coat it every other year or so. Even though I am hiring it done because of driveway length. I would rather Have concrete with a rough(broom) finish (about 15 years Later You end Up with a smooth finish anyways).

So if You Can afford it Get Concrete. I had a 3 car length wide(except for going over the ditch to the street which was 2 Car Length wide) By 100 ft Long for $17,000 Back In 2012 Might have been a Little More or Less I can't exactly remember the cost Or at Least doing some like mark02tj with a concrete Pad By the Garage:bigthumb:
 

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In NY, there is no additional property tax on a blacktop driveway. Short answer-Its not real property if it can be picked up & moved or removed. Sounds crazy but its correct at least until four years ago.
Never heard of a taxing authority consider concrete or asphalt a moveable object, do they not even re-assess wood decks attached to your house ??
 

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Thoughts from a friend who is a paving contractor of 30+ years:

Asphalt is for driving, concrete is for parking

Done properly, both excel at those purposes. If the driveway is small, and budget permits, I would consider doing all concrete to avoid two different projects. But, if the size is larger, I would seriously consider doing a combination of both. Concrete where you park/work and asphalt for the rest of the driveway.
 

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Never heard of a taxing authority consider concrete or asphalt a moveable object, do they not even re-assess wood decks attached to your house ??
I may have misstated it. It's not so much that it's moveable. It's more that it is not considered "Real Property" for tax purposes, same as an above ground swimming pool is not taxable. Frankly, I'm talking about New York. Keep your comments low key or Chuck you Schumer & the king of the MY mafia, Cuomo will find something else to suck the life blood out of the few working class left in the state. I can say this because I'm an ex New Yorker.
 

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I love my 1023e with the 54" snowblower. I only wish I either had a blacktop or concrete driveway because of picking up stones while snow blowing! I know that there are members from all over the country and in Canada and other areas. I live in central NY and get freezing, thawing temps. My question to all of you knowledgeable people what is better Blacktop or Concrete? Blacktop requires maintenance (coating) where concrete seems to be more maintenance free. I have a fairly large driveway approx. 30' x 100' and another area for 5th wheel that is 20' x 60. I'm liking the idea of concrete but I think the cost is much more than blacktop. Just wanting opinions. Thanks :dunno:
Haven't read the thread yet, but I did my driveway last year (2018). Went from this,




To this,




Because I also hated messing with the stone, and because it was that pea sized stuff, it got everywhere. Tracked into the house, garages, vehicles, stuck in tires, etc. Keeping up with weeds was impossible. So I finally bit the bullet.


I had never had a driveway done before and based on my imagination, I way underestimated the cost. In my head, I was thinking "Probably around 5kish," and then my first estimate came in at 15K+. I was surprised at how expensive it was, but I shouldn't have been because I had no real basis for thinking what I was.

I received 2 more estimates, 7.5K and 10.3K, and decided to go with the middle estimate.

I'm very happy with the driveway, but you're right, will need maintenance going forward, but it's not that hard to seal my relatively flat drive.


I didn't price concrete because once I saw how expensive pavement was, I knew concrete was going to be much more expensive and much more than I wanted to spend on my country driveway.


Good luck with your decision! I figured I'd throw my numbers up there since we probably have similar square footage.
 

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Thoughts from a friend who is a paving contractor of 30+ years:

Asphalt is for driving, concrete is for parking

Done properly, both excel at those purposes. If the driveway is small, and budget permits, I would consider doing all concrete to avoid two different projects. But, if the size is larger, I would seriously consider doing a combination of both. Concrete where you park/work and asphalt for the rest of the driveway.
This is the best comment I’ve read, that is the answer if it suits ones needs.


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