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I'm trying to convert an old gas 4x2 gator to electric drive.
I'm debating how to connect the motor to the transmission. I could do it any one of 3 ways:

1. Remove the secondary clutch and use a chain drive to connect the motor and trans shafts.
2. Keep the secondary clutch and drive the cogged belt with the motor.
3. Keep the secondary clutch and drive the cogged belt with the old primary clutch to the motor.

Any thoughts on the best way?

Thanks!

Bill
 

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Welcome to GTT bferster.
I can't help with your question but if I may ask, why would you want to? For use in a mobile home RV park?
 

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I'm excited about your project. :) I love old 4x2 Gators, and happen to work on a lot of industrial electric vehicles. JD made an electric version of the Gator for a while as well as gas.

What voltage/ motor/ controller are you going with? Where are you putting the batteries?

Unlike a gas engine, when you come to a stop with an electric motor the motor doesn't continue to turn. However, I wouldn't go to a cogged belt or chain drive. If you get under a hard enough load, the motor will stall and blow a fuse. I would rather have the belt slip than blow a fuse or burn up a component. I don't know what kind of fabrication setup you have, but I might be inclined to keep the Deere drive belt and clutches and adapt the drive end to your motor, just so there are fewer things you have to try and change over.

Please keep us updated and post some pictures, I'm pretty excited about this. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm excited about your project. :) I love old 4x2 Gators, and happen to work on a lot of industrial electric vehicles. JD made an electric version of the Gator for a while as well as gas.

What voltage/ motor/ controller are you going with? Where are you putting the batteries?

Unlike a gas engine, when you come to a stop with an electric motor the motor doesn't continue to turn. However, I wouldn't go to a cogged belt or chain drive. If you get under a hard enough load, the motor will stall and blow a fuse. I would rather have the belt slip than blow a fuse or burn up a component. I don't know what kind of fabrication setup you have, but I might be inclined to keep the Deere drive belt and clutches and adapt the drive end to your motor, just so there are fewer things you have to try and change over.

Please keep us updated and post some pictures, I'm pretty excited about this. :good2:
I'm using a 24V Ramsey winch motor (2300 RPM, 4HP)
conrolled by an Alltrax SMP-48225 225A PWM controller,
and 4 sealed lead acid batteries (12AH/12V), although I may need to add more for range later on

Here's a link to a Flickr site I'm using to document the project:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bferster/sets/72157645408986978/

If I pull off the primary clutch from the gas motor, will it be easy to attach the clutch assembly to the 3/4" shaft of the electric motor?
 

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You would probably need to use a bushing on the shaft as I think the gas engine probably had a 1" crankshaft
 

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I thought I replied to this yesterday, but I guess not. :unknown:

I've never had the clutch off the Gator, so I don't know what the crankshaft is. If you have your old engine, pull the clutch off and see. I believe it will be larger than your 3/4 electric motor shaft and will require having some form of bushing made. If you have access to a lathe it should be fairly simple. If your winch motor uses a key to drive the load you would need to broach a keyway into your adapter.

Your motor is 4hp, the factory engine was 10. The electric motor may need more reduction to have enough torque to move the machine, especially under load. The factory clutch mechanism may not be able to provide that.
 

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Is there an adjustment for the engaging RPM. My gator has to get such a high RPM to engage it that it's like popping the clutch to do a burnout. Mine is the 2007 TX
 

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Is there an adjustment for the engaging RPM. My gator has to get such a high RPM to engage it that it's like popping the clutch to do a burnout. Mine is the 2007 TX
This is from the service manual for the 4X2, the TX is the next generation so things might have changed.


• Clutch should slowly start to engage and move drive belt between 1350 - 1600 rpm. Drive belt should be riding high in primary clutch and low in secondary clutch (C).
• If clutch has harsh engagement, erratic transition, hesitation, or clutch noise (chirping); perform primary clutch lubrication. Check primary clutch for cam weights binding, pivot pins worn, flat spots on rollers or rollers sticking, and no groove in sheave. Repair or replace primary clutch.
• If engine is surging; check engine and governor performance.
• Smooth engagement and transition (up-shift), primary clutch is good. Go to Drive Train Performance Tests; secondary clutch down-shifting check.
 

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looks like I need to start looking for a manual. I know nothing about them. Need some guidance
 

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I have the manuals on both the gas/diesel Turf Gator machines, and the E Gator. I owned a 1999 E Gator and it was a very good performer on my hilly acreage at my last place. Like all electric vehicles, the batteries required are pretty heavy and expensive, but the ease of use of the vehicle overall made it a pleasure to use and maintain. Send me a PM with your e-mail and I may be able to excerpt small segments of these manuals. The TM1518 for the gas turf machines is 56 MB and the E gator TM 1766 is about 22 MB. The transaxles and brakes on these two machines are completely different, among many other things...

Here is a picture or two of my E Gator
E_Gator_profile_with_bed_lifted.jpg Gator chores.jpg Gator capacity times two.jpg

Here is a phantom view of the wiring harness, battery and motor layout from the TM 1766
E gator harness and battery layout.jpg

Chuck
 

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Your Ramsey Winch motor is considered an intermittent duty whereas the type used in electric golf carts is a continuous severe duty. Personally I like the idea of an electric motor at each wheel hub. True all wheel drive.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The motor in the Deere E Gator is separately excited, not a series motor like a winch motor -- and the Curtis controller is rather sophisticated and includes dynamic braking. Your project is very interesting and we are all interested in how it progresses. If you think that any information from the Deere electric version is of any use, just let me know and I will try to get it to you. As said elsewhere, the duty cycle of the motor may be your biggest challenge -- the one in the E Gator is rated as shown here:

E-Gator specifications from TM1766.jpg

Chuck

Here is a portion of the TM1518 if you ever wanted to repair your gas engine...
View attachment air cooled gas gator engine info from TM1518.pdf
 
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