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Which would you rather buy? Does anyone run both? Coolant vs Engine block heaters? Does anyone make a hydraulic line heater?

It is on a 1025r.
 

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I went with an engine block heater, have yet to use it as it was installed 2 months ago....had tractor 5 years here in CT and never had a issue with starting. have kept in unheated shed, and when needed w/ winter at its coldest, put a blanket over it and small heater under it pre start. think block heater is safer way to go. Having said all that, I don't have to deal w/ the temps you do.....I did use a thread on this forum as a guide to install, was easy to follow and very well written. If you go that route I will attempt to find it again. Good luck w/ your decision.
 

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I had a block heater installed on my 1025r before delivery in 2013.
I had one on my 2305 before that.
Tractors start easier, cab heater works faster, I usually plug it in at least 1/2 hour before starting.
 

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Engine block heater is far the best way to go, you should not need the coolant heater with the block heater, I assume you mean radiator hose heater when you say coolant, as they both heat the coolant system only the block heater heats it in the engine block which will transfer the heat to the oil also if plugged in long enough. We have used block heaters on the tractors and skid loaders on the farm since the mid 60's. As far as hyd. System heater we have never used this guess not sure if available. There is a excellent thread on Instalation of a block heater for the 1025R with pics.
 

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I have had my 1025R for little under a month now. The dealer automatically put on the quote to install the engine block heater - AR87167 with needed adapter AM134805. I am also in MN, so I thought this would be nice to have right away for winter. I have been plugging it in about an hour before I plan to use it and it seems the tractor starts much happier- little smoke, smooth idle, etc.
 

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I think both the coolant and block heaters will work just fine. They'll both heat the block up which, in turn should warm both the coolant and oil. You get to the same end either way.

I prefer to use a magnetic block heater just because I'm not adding anything to the engine. No additional places for leaks and less chance of me doing something stupid that might kill my machine. (Not that I've ever done anything stupid before... much. :laugh: )
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think both the coolant and block heaters will work just fine. They'll both heat the block up which, in turn should warm both the coolant and oil. You get to the same end either way.

I prefer to use a magnetic block heater just because I'm not adding anything to the engine. No additional places for leaks and less chance of me doing something stupid that might kill my machine. (Not that I've ever done anything stupid before... much. :laugh: )

Thanks to everyone. Jim, do you have a link to the one that you use? Right now the JD sits in the attached garage with heated floors (50 deg) but it may be moving to a utility shed soon. I do like the idea of a magnetic one, if the tractor doesn't get moved to the utility shed, it will need to do overnights in unheated garages off site.
 

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Years ago I had a magnetic heater which worked good, was handy to put on any oil pan of something sitting out in sub zero weather. Didn't heat the coolant but really helped get the oil flowing quickly.


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I picked up a Kat's 1160 300-watt unit. Same company make a couple of other sizes as well.
 

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Brrrtend to add some video rr

I bought the block heater early this spring, despite not experiencing much of a problem starting at -15 degrees last year. I just wanted to be "nicer" to her this year. I intend to add some video of the installation process in the next month or so.
 

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Tried my block heater this AM for the first time

I had a block heater installed on the 1025R that I bought this August.

The last few times I started the tractor, the temperature in the garage was in the mid forties. There was a lot of smoke when I started. This morning, I plugged in the block heater for about 20 minutes just before starting. It started just as quickly as in the past, but I was surprised at how little smoke there was. I'm going to use the block heater regularly and hope this morning's start can be repeated. Has anyone else noticed this effect?

Keane
 

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I had a block heater installed on the 1025R that I bought this August.

The last few times I started the tractor, the temperature in the garage was in the mid forties. There was a lot of smoke when I started. This morning, I plugged in the block heater for about 20 minutes just before starting. It started just as quickly as in the past, but I was surprised at how little smoke there was. I'm going to use the block heater regularly and hope this morning's start can be repeated. Has anyone else noticed this effect?

Keane
Yes that is the same with my 1026. I use the block heater any time it gets close to freezing temps and it makes a big difference in how smooth it starts.

In my neck of the woods a block heater is a given. As others have said, the coolant heaters are doing much the same thing.
 

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I have a coolant heater on my 2320 and it starts just fine at -30 or so after being plugged in for an hour or 2. 6 years old and still using the original battery to.
 

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just picked up a 200w magnetic heater for mine.. Not that cold yet but still -5 Celsius.. Pretty neat how quickly it heated the pan and the oil.. About 20mins and the side of the pan was warm to the touch.. We'll see how it does when it we're talkin' -30 Celsius..
 

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I put a Wolverine oil pan heater on my 2305. It is a flat heating pad and it just sticks to the underside of the oil pan and the heat rises up thru the whole engine. I followed the directions for cleaning the underside of the pan and then used some high temp sealant around the edges to be safe. Had it on for several years and it works great. I try to plug it in an hour or even 2 before plowing in the winter in Ohio. I bought it even though it was a ''Wolverine''! :laugh:
 

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I picked up a Kat's 1160 300-watt unit. Same company make a couple of other sizes as well.

Jim,

Do you have a picture showing where you attach this magnetic heater to your tractor?
Do you put it on the block, or on the oil pan?
 

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Jim,

Do you have a picture showing where you attach this magnetic heater to your tractor?
Do you put it on the block, or on the oil pan?
No pic at the moment but I put it on the block. On my 2032R, if I pop the hood there is a clear area on the block right between the alternator and the starter. YMMV on other machines.
 

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Either style will work effectively. If you install either yourself the block heater is usually less expensive. If you have to pay for installation the hose heater will be less expensive overall because anyone with half a brain and 15 minutes can install a hose heater at home. A block heater on the other hand can be difficult for many people at home to install thus you may be paying the dealer or a mechanic labor for installing it.

Technically there are 3 types of heaters. The block heater, the radiator hose heater, and there is also a heater hose/radiator hose style that heats the coolant and circulates the coolant through the system. This circulation style is the best by far. Last I checked they were in the $50 - $75 range to buy one and are an easy install.

Someone said the block style will also partially heat the oil as well. This isn't accurate. The block heater heats the coolant only. Very little heat if any transfers to the oil because heat rises and the coolant is in the engine block which is above the oil pan where all of your oil is sitting.

Bottom line is get the option that is most affordable because all of them I discussed will work very well. I live in WI where we can see up to -40 and we normally see -20 often. Today was -10 at 8 AM. My block heater works great on my 3320. I can plug it in for 30 - 60 minutes and it fires up no problem.
 

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Most modern Diesel engines have so much compression a heater is just not necessary. The purpose of a block heater is to warm the cylinders to aid in starting. Personally even though my Diesels are in Texas I still use a block heater. It can make the difference on an engine that has had some miles or hours put on it for starting easier.

Just as important though as we are moving into the colder months make sure you have run out of the Summer Blended Diesels and start moving to a Winter Blend. The Winter Blend is less likely to gel up on you which aids in a faster start. It is not marked on pumps so you may need to talk to an attendant.

I also use Cetane Boost during the Winter really helps keep the diesel components happier.


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