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When I first used my 1025, it overheated and blew off some coolant. I let it cool down, cleaned radiator screen and hosed out radiator. I called dealer and he said to check the screen often. It was my fault as a new owner, I just didn't think it would overheat that fast. I asked him what to add and he said any 50/50. I went to the nearest auto parts store and added Preston yellow 50/50 pre diluted antifreeze coolant. Now that I've been reading the service info it says to use 60/40. Should I drain the coolant and use new JD or will it be ok? Don't want to do damage due to wrong chemicals added via the Preston. Haven't had a problem again. Coming up on a 200 hrs service interval and wondering if I should just change coolant. Also wondering what is involved if I have to such as dran plugs on engine block etc.
 

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When I first used my 1025, it overheated and blew off some coolant. I let it cool down, cleaned radiator screen and hosed out radiator. I called dealer and he said to check the screen often. It was my fault as a new owner, I just didn't think it would overheat that fast. I asked him what to add and he said any 50/50. I went to the nearest auto parts store and added Preston yellow 50/50 pre diluted antifreeze coolant. Now that I've been reading the service info it says to use 60/40. Should I drain the coolant and use new JD or will it be ok? Don't want to do damage due to wrong chemicals added via the Preston. Haven't had a problem again. Coming up on a 200 hrs service interval and wondering if I should just change coolant. Also wondering what is involved if I have to such as dran plugs on engine block etc.
If it's not to much trouble. drain system good and go back with JD coolguard


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Pretty much coolant R coolant as long as you stick to well known name brands. It is predominantly ethylene glycol, with an anti-corrosion package added.

If you don't buy the pre-diluted stuff, what you dilute it with is probably more important than the actual coolant IMO. You should always use distilled or deionized water as a tractor has a useful life measured in decades.

60/40 is an odd mix as it will not provide the minimum freeze point nor maximum boiling point. I suspect (again, because tractors have a very long service life) the engineering reason for that is to increase the concentration of the anti-corrosives and the reduced temperature range is an acceptable trade-off.

If you're going to be changing it soon anyway, I wouldn't worry about it.

Al
 

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If these Engines are a WET Sleeve Cylinder liner, the Coolant is a Coolant is wrong. Wet Sleeve engines require a special additive to prevent cavatation damage to the liners. I do not remember what it is but if the wrong antifreeze is used the liners will pit and eventually cause a coolant leak into the engine. Please make sure you use the correct antifreeze. If the Engine is not WET Sleeve then Anti-freeze is Anti-freeze. Examples of a WET Sleeve Diesel is the old Ford 7.3 liter and a non Wet Sleeve example would be the Cummins 5.9 Liter.
 

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If these Engines are a WET Sleeve Cylinder liner, the Coolant is a Coolant is wrong. Wet Sleeve engines require a special additive to prevent cavatation damage to the liners. I do not remember what it is but if the wrong antifreeze is used the liners will pit and eventually cause a coolant leak into the engine. Please make sure you use the correct antifreeze. If the Engine is not WET Sleeve then Anti-freeze is Anti-freeze. Examples of a WET Sleeve Diesel is the old Ford 7.3 liter and a non Wet Sleeve example would be the Cummins 5.9 Liter.
Electrolysis is what your referring to! I've overhauled a few cat irrigation engine that this has happened to. Pressure up the block (cooling system) drop oil pan and watch for drips from piston area!


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the Coolant is a Coolant is wrong
That's not what I said. I said "coolant R coolant". Big difference.:laugh:

Lined cylinder bores are more typical of heavy duty engines. Unless I'm mistaken, these tractor engines are unlined and when the hole gets too big, your only option is to bore and use oversized pistons.

Al
 

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It's best to use the same brand antifreeze. Especially for long term longevity of the engine. They make many different formulations that don't all mix. Any coolant is better than no coolant. Just change it out asap.

As far as the mix goes 50/50 is usually the minimum/most common. 70% straight antifreeze and 30% distilled water is as strong as you want to go. This will give you the maximum boil over and the lowest freezing points. I usually take a 5 gallon bucket and mix 2 gallons of coolant to one gallon of water. This will give you exactly 70/30. Mixing it stronger than 70/30 or weaker than 50/50 will cause overheating problems. It will also freeze at a higher temperature.

My X540 has such a small cooling system that I just bought a gallon of JD premix. It's also a lot less of a hassle then mixing it.
 

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When I first used my 1025, it overheated and blew off some coolant. I let it cool down, cleaned radiator screen and hosed out radiator. I called dealer and he said to check the screen often. It was my fault as a new owner, I just didn't think it would overheat that fast. I asked him what to add and he said any 50/50. I went to the nearest auto parts store and added Preston yellow 50/50 pre diluted antifreeze coolant. Now that I've been reading the service info it says to use 60/40.
There have been numerous threads recently where instead of consulting the owner's manual folks are calling the dealer for service details and getting WRONG information. It seems to be happening with a multitude of equipment types. I'm sure there are dealers out there who know there stuff but the story is just becoming all too common. The owners manual and technical manual should be the #1 go-to source for information, followed by the GTT forums. :) If you feel it necessary go ahead and call the dealer for a 3rd opinion.
 

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60/40 is an odd mix as it will not provide the minimum freeze point nor maximum boiling point. I suspect (again, because tractors have a very long service life) the engineering reason for that is to increase the concentration of the anti-corrosives and the reduced temperature range is an acceptable trade-off.
True, but 60/40 is what the 1025R manual is recommending if you do not use the pre-mix.

[h=3]Recommended Engine Coolant[/h]The engine cooling system is filled to provide year-round protection against corrosion and cylinder liner pitting, and winter freeze protection to -37 degrees C (-34 degrees F). If protection at lower temperatures is required, consult your John Deere dealer for recommendations.

  • The following coolants are preferred:
  • John Deere COOL-GARD™ II Premix
  • John Deere COOL-GARD™ II PG Premix
Use John Deere COOL-GARD II PG Premix when a non-toxic coolant formulation is required.
The following engine coolant is also recommended:

  • John Deere COOL-GARD™ II Concentrate in a 40—60% mixture of concentrate with quality water.
John Deere COOL-GARD II Premix, COOL-GARD II PG Premix, and COOL-GARD II Concentrate coolants do not require use of supplemental coolant additives.

 

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There have been numerous threads recently where instead of consulting the owner's manual folks are calling the dealer for service details and getting WRONG information. It seems to be happening with a multitude of equipment types. I'm sure there are dealers out there who know there stuff but the story is just becoming all too common. The owners manual and technical manual should be the #1 go-to source for information, followed by the GTT forums. :) If you feel it necessary go ahead and call the dealer for a 3rd opinion.
Yea I don't know how a lot of dealers are when a customer calls with a question like that. You may get a salesperson or parts and some wrong info. At our store they call a tech for the line. I'll answer and help them out. If it's a hard question the team leader (me) will take the call and get the answers they need. That's just how our place works. We don't want wrong info being given to our customers. Customers and tractors are the top priority!


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Yea I don't know how a lot of dealers are when a customer calls with a question like that. You may get a salesperson or parts and some wrong info. At our store they call a tech for the line. I'll answer and help them out. If it's a hard question the team leader (me) will take the call and get the answers they need. That's just how our place works. We don't want wrong info being given to our customers. Customers and tractors are the top priority!
It sounds like you are handling it the correct way. It seems too many folks just "wing" an answer rather than looking it up. There was a guy on one of the forums a while back who called his dealer about tightening the tension bolt on his 3-series front axle. The dealer gave him some ridiculous torque recommendation. It turns out it was the axle free-play adjuster bolt and it resulted in him stripping it out.
 

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It sounds like you are handling it the correct way. It seems too many folks just "wing" an answer rather than looking it up. There was a guy on one of the forums a while back who called his dealer about tightening the tension bolt on his 3-series front axle. The dealer gave him some ridiculous torque recommendation. It turns out it was the axle free-play adjuster bolt and it resulted in him stripping it out.
Good god. Yea can't be having that crap.


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I don't know what kind of coolant is used on tractors but be careful I know from this training video. for dodge vehicles 2013 and newer they use what is called oat coolant and if mixed bad gelling can happen :banghead:
 

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Yea if you have HOAT coolant then do not mix it with anything but HOAT coolant. HOAT is a mix of IAT and OAT. I worked for Caterpillar for years and the ELC extended life coolant for cat is a HOAT coolant. It's orange/red color. Not to be mixed with green.


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True, but 60/40 is what the 1025R manual is recommending if you do not use the pre-mix.

Recommended Engine Coolant

The engine cooling system is filled to provide year-round protection against corrosion and cylinder liner pitting, and winter freeze protection to -37 degrees C (-34 degrees F). If protection at lower temperatures is required, consult your John Deere dealer for recommendations.

  • The following coolants are preferred:
  • John Deere COOL-GARD™ II Premix
  • John Deere COOL-GARD™ II PG Premix
Use John Deere COOL-GARD II PG Premix when a non-toxic coolant formulation is required.
The following engine coolant is also recommended:

  • John Deere COOL-GARD™ II Concentrate in a 40—60% mixture of concentrate with quality water.
John Deere COOL-GARD II Premix, COOL-GARD II PG Premix, and COOL-GARD II Concentrate coolants do not require use of supplemental coolant additives.

JUST TO CLARIFY....
The manual is not calling for a 60 40 mix. They are saying a mixture of 40 - 60% concentrate with water. Your 50/50 is fine
 

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Discussion Starter #16
There have been numerous threads recently where instead of consulting the owner's manual folks are calling the dealer for service details and getting WRONG information. It seems to be happening with a multitude of equipment types. I'm sure there are dealers out there who know there stuff but the story is just becoming all too common. The owners manual and technical manual should be the #1 go-to source for information, followed by the GTT forums. :) If you feel it necessary go ahead and call the dealer for a 3rd opinion.
I agree, Jgay! I learned the hard way a few times. I've now read the manuals backwards and forward. I started a maintanence log that includes wrench and tool size, dates of service and all relavent service part #'s.

I actually talked to head service tech. I figured easy question, just let rig cool down slow, clean screen and radiator than add some coolant. I didn't lose that much. His exact words were," any 50/50 is fine". Wanted to get the rig back in service and drive to my garage. Later, READ the manual and it said 60/40 with certain chemical specs.

I get better information from you guys than from JD dealers tech and parts staff!!!
 

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JUST TO CLARIFY....
The manual is not calling for a 60 40 mix. They are saying a mixture of 40 - 60% concentrate with water. Your 50/50 is fine
Duh! [sound of hand slapping forehead]. You are 100% correct. Thank you for reeling us back in.
 

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Yea I don't know how a lot of dealers are when a customer calls with a question like that. You may get a salesperson or parts and some wrong info. At our store they call a tech for the line. I'll answer and help them out. If it's a hard question the team leader (me) will take the call and get the answers they need. That's just how our place works. We don't want wrong info being given to our customers. Customers and tractors are the top priority!


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Wrong information was given out by multiple people at the bike shop that I used to work for. Especially the boss's girlfriend. She could literally say whatever.

Your store sounds like a good place to buy.
 
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Attached is a useful piece of cross reference information regarding coolants.

It is put out by Fleetguard but it gives you a good reference as to the specific type of antifreeze (Organic Acid (OAT), Hybrid or otherwise) and which types are compatible. (The colors can really help too)

It isn't complete by an y means but it is a good reference.

Also wanted to address the OP
Your 50/50 ratio is fine as I said before but do check the bottles closely.

As you can see from this chart cool-guard II is an OAT If your original antifreeze was golden in color you had a Col-Guard II fill and if you added a non-compatible standard antifreeze you should drain, flush, and fill as soon as possible.

Non-compatible antifreezes can cause OATs to turn into Oatmeal (if gets all thick and lumpy).. which isn't good.
 

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