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A couple of years ago I got started on building a gazebo, which I'm now calling a belvedere, out of a 12' satellite dish and some tempered glass panels. That's a subject for another post.

I decided to put a cupola on top, and then decided to build something for it that I'd thought about for a long time: a through-the-roof weather vane. That's like a regular weather vane, but the shaft extends through into the room with an indoor pointer at ceiling level.

This is where I started working with copper. After the weather vane was essentially complete, I decided to add an anemometer (add-a-mometer. :) ) to the shaft. The add-a-mometer floats on 2 ball bearings so that it can spin independently of the wind direction.



I Hammered out the leaves for the tail, an acorn for the pointer, the walking bear and his dog, and the copper hemispheres for the add-a-mometer.

Video of the whole assembly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohFKBsH1T84

Here's an early video of the weather vane and indoor indicator: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjuKGuX5V-w&feature=youtu.be
 

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Cool! :thumbup1gif:
 

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image.jpeg

That's a nice piece gizmo. The one I posted is copper and brass. The reason, I posted it is to show you how nice copper looks when finished. clean it well, soak it in vinegar but watch it!!! Remove from vinegar and a quick rinse with soapy water. Next biff it with compound. Wash it in denatured alcohol and clean it with a soft brush and dip and clean again. Get some compound and polish it with a buffer wheel and polishing drill bit ends for the details and tough to reach repeat with finer and finer compounds. Dip and clean it again in denatured alcohol. Repeat this until you have the finish you want. Last stage, dip again in denatured alcohol while wearing gloves, it will remove all moisture. Hang and use a clear coat. If you need, I will send you a pic of the clear cot I use that is also for exterior.
 

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Hi Firemark,
I think you maybe meant to address me, since gizmo didn't post a picture.

I actually spent a lot of time experimenting with the patinas on the weather vane. It turns out that you can get a decent verdigris green with nothing more than spraying on Miracle-Gro and letting it do its thing. The bear and dog were patina-ed with chemicals to make Florentine Brown,

OTOH, the copper fireplace screen I posted elsewhere here, I spent a lot of time on the bench buffer polishing it to a mirror finish.

Here's another project involving copper pipe. I scored some oval marble and granite counter top sink cutouts.

I made a copper pipe frame and legs for a marble side table. The rim of the cutout was not very attractive, probably being cut out with an angle grinder. I used a hammer and pitching chisel to make it look hand cut.

 

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Hi Firemark,
I think you maybe meant to address me, since gizmo didn't post a picture.

I actually spent a lot of time experimenting with the patinas on the weather vane. It turns out that you can get a decent verdigris green with nothing more than spraying on Miracle-Gro and letting it do its thing. The bear and dog were patina-ed with chemicals to make Florentine Brown,

OTOH, the copper fireplace screen I posted elsewhere here, I spent a lot of time on the bench buffer polishing it to a mirror finish.

Here's another project involving copper pipe. I scored some oval marble and granite counter top sink cutouts.

I made a copper pipe frame and legs for a marble side table. The rim of the cutout was not very attractive, probably being cut out with an angle grinder. I used a hammer and pitching chisel to make it look hand cut.

Sorry, senior moment. Yes, it's an interesting science. I do a lot of antique restoration work and find it interesting. I mostly work on old telegraph equipment, fire alarm boxes, tube radios and a lot of electro mechanicle stuff. Clocks, very old bank vault locks etc.

Nice work on the table.

I blued a piece of steel in a trough of water with salts in it over a fire for a friend who's a gun buff and he couldn't believe it. Oxidation can be very desirable! I usually don't remove patina on a lot of antique pieces. I worked with a guy who gave me two WW2 knives that he wanted me to restore. He grinded the edges on a wheel, sanded the shanks and ruined the leather handles by cleaning with the wrong stuff. I gave them back and said,"my hall mark will never go on these".
 

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Very nice work!
 
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