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Discussion Starter #1
Have any of you ever run one of these before. We had one when I was a kid and we could cut some wood with it. I was looking at this. It's nice since it runs right off the PTO. The old one that we had and others had ran off a belt.

Vermont Woodsman Buzz Saw
 

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I've messed with an old one, but never did any serious cutting with it.

I fail to see what advantages it really offers over a chainsaw for firewood. I cut to firewood lengths off the tree, then split. It seems like you would have to be cutting very small diameter stuff for it to really shine.
 

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I have been around them never allowed to operate. Not pto driven like that one. Note how much the blade costs in case you get into some high tensile barbed wire which most all barbed wire has been for quite a while from my observations. If you have one of those kitchen stoves/ovens with a firebox more coal oriented and very small buying a new one might make sense. The design dates to before modern chainsaws. A guy I know had bought a similar device without the pto shaft etc at auction last year, I saw it on his trailer, not sure if he sold it or has powered it by now.

fran
 

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I've never run one before but an old friend of mine had a 36" one that ran off a flat belt from the side of the tractor. There was no guard at all, that thing scared the #@$%^& out of me. At least this one in the post has a gaurd of sorts.

For the price you could buy a couple of pretty good chain saws though. You still need the chain saw to cut the chord wood so unless you are buying it cut to chord length I don't know if it would be worth it overall imo.

I still thing they are cool, just the size of the blade makes them look real bad aXX.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I appreciate all your points and they have some validity. I appreciate the point about using a chain saw. I own 2 Stihl's, an 044 and a 200T. The 044 I have used to cut at least 80 cord of wood or more over the last 13 or 14 years. It is an excellent saw. So I recognize the benefit of a chain saw. However it takes much more time and effort to cut with a chain saw wood 12" and smaller into 20" to 24" sticks. The speed of a cord wood saw is a whole lot faster. If you cut the pieces into 6' lengths and run it on the cordwood saw you will beat the chainsaw in speed hands down just for handling alone. When we used them as I was a kid growing up we had chainsaws as well and my dad ran the big McCullough and Homolite saws that were heavy and powerful.

I think that you have a good point about hitting some steel in the wood. That would not be good because these saw blades are expensive.

I am just looking at it since I have a stack of wood in 4' to 6' lengths that is growing in size which I have piled using the PF off the 990. There is at least 3 to 4 cord to cut up and I have another 4 to 6 cord to add to it. So again it is tempting.
 

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I wouldn't want to wrestle a 6' long, 12" diameter log around on the cordwood saw, but that's just me. :laugh: What diameter wood can it cut? I could see an advantage to using it for folks with wood cook stoves with the short 8-10" fireboxes, it would make quick work out of turning full sized firewood into stove lengths.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wouldn't want to wrestle a 6' long, 12" diameter log around on the cordwood saw, but that's just me. :laugh: What diameter wood can it cut? I could see an advantage to using it for folks with wood cook stoves with the short 8-10" fireboxes, it would make quick work out of turning full sized firewood into stove lengths.
It will handle up to 12". I agree to handle 6", 12" that would be a good size stick of wood and I would want more than one person on it. It is only a thought right now and I have too many other items to work on and buy and there are limited funds so for right now it will wait in the background. Maybe when I am up in their neck of the woods I can take a look at one and see if it is as good as it sounds. I read a few reviews on it and they were not too bad. I still have a blade from my fathers old saw up in NH and I believe he has some blocks with a shaft there as well. It would take me a while to build something since I do not weld yet. But that is on my list as well.
 

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That saw looks like something out of the movie Fargo.
:laugh: :laugh: And right at home in the snow!!!

I see them come up for sale at farm auctions and have been thinking of getting one if I found one cheap enough. A lot of times when I'm clearing trees the smaller stuff gets cut into 4'-8' lengths for quick removal, and I keep thinking one of these would work well to cut them into wood stove lengths once I got home.
 

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Here is a different make but this one has a little better guard system.

 

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Been watching this thread and I'd like to offer this: I have a couple friends in a western state that used to cut firewood with one of these "MONSTERS" called "Buzz Sawyer". It was home made, it was made out of what I thought was pretty decent angle and box iron, overkill bearings, it had been "navy quality welded" and it had a 36" blade that came from... someplace, and was powered by a 4 cyl English Ford product engine (which also could be clutched into a handy air compressor under the table). They kept it sharp, it ran very true and smooth and it sounded very cool...

During a visit out there and asking where "Buzz" wuz they told me a neat story about how it destroyed itself, the front and back glass and tailgate on a nice Ford 250 4WD and very nearly the 3 guys around it keeping it in wood. They fed it a 15" or so aspen as they had been doing all morning and it took offense to a piece of iron imbedded in the wood. After the pieces all had come back down from the sky and operator roll call completed sucessfully they finally checked out the "problem".

Someone had joined 2 draft horse shoes back to back with bent nails and (they surmised) nailed it to this tree for... whatever reason??? The tree grew right around the shoes and wound up as an exciting carnival attraction. The "Boys" still do their wood but it's chainsaws all the way now. I've seen my share of sparky glitter stuff coming out of my chainsaws in my day and changed out plenty of chains due to imbedded "objects ferro d'antique" but I never gave thought to cutting some of this stuff with a rapidly spinning "buzz sore". After this thread I'm going back to not thinking about buzz saws ever again forever. Oh yes, it CAN happen to you! :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Stories like that always make you sit back and take notice and tell you that maybe one ought to stay away. And the reality of steel in the trees is always there so this is a valid point and one that others have raised as well.

What I am about to write I don't write to justify the buzz saw in any way. But it is to say we need caution in all these types of equipment that we run. I don't know this from 1st hand experience. My father saw chains come off chain saws and do some pretty heavy damage and at one time took a guy to the hospital with his whole leg ripped open from top to bottom. chain saws are way dangerous too especially if you get fatigued and you start to lose your sharpness etc. I realize that the buzz saw is far more dangerous with this type of thing but chain saws can be oh so dangerous as well. Another friend had his neighbor almost lose an eye from his chain saw. So these are realities as well. I have lost a chain before as well and this is no fun thing. My guess is that there have been far more accidents caused by chain saws then buzz saws but of course there are far less buzz saws out there too.

Thanks for the advice and the real world disasters with equipment that can be pretty dangerous. It will make me think before I buy if I do seek to buy.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Here is a different make but this one has a little better guard system.

that gives a good example of the speed that you can cut with. That is the benefit. Does it outweigh the risk?
 

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That thing still scares me. Bucking little dinky sized wood like that machine in the video is cutting, I'll outsaw it every time with my Stihl 026/20". I see that he's split the wood first and is buzzing off 12" or so pieces one at a time. To re-saw a bunch of wood that size (like when the wood guy delivers stuff that's 2"-6" too long for the stove) I like to drive 4 or 6 pairs of rebars into the ground like a rack with the depth just short of the curve of the tip (18" for a 20" bar), stack in whatever lengths 4' high of wood, bungee the top in and saw down en mass through the entire pile to length. Resizing wood like this can keep 3 people very busy! It's also easy with this method to be off to the left side of the chain line for a little more safety.

Every power tool has it's dangers... including a Cuisinart, but we accept danger to get firewood fast or a good sautee'.:laugh:
 

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For what it's worth, I use a similar piece of equipment. It's an old cordwood saw attachment on an old David Bradley 2 wheel tractor. I believe the blade on it is 20". I cut limbs, etc. into 8 foot lengths and then use this to cut them down to 2 foot lengths. I use this wood, in the 1/2 to 2" diameter size to fuel my small hobby size maple sap evaporator. The small size is good because it burns fast and hot. I refuel about every 5 to 7 minutes. Larger wood is either split smaller or used in my outdoor boiler.

I have also used it to quickly cut slab wood. All I can say is that this set-up works well for me.

Rich Baxter
 

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Discussion Starter #16
For what it's worth, I use a similar piece of equipment. It's an old cordwood saw attachment on an old David Bradley 2 wheel tractor. I believe the blade on it is 20". I cut limbs, etc. into 8 foot lengths and then use this to cut them down to 2 foot lengths. I use this wood, in the 1/2 to 2" diameter size to fuel my small hobby size maple sap evaporator. The small size is good because it burns fast and hot. I refuel about every 5 to 7 minutes. Larger wood is either split smaller or used in my outdoor boiler.

I have also used it to quickly cut slab wood. All I can say is that this set-up works well for me.

Rich Baxter
Rich, do you have any pictures or a movie of you running the saw? They would be great to see.
 

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Rich, do you have any pictures or a movie of you running the saw? They would be great to see.
Sorry, I do not at this time. I just recently got a camera, so once this nasty weather is over I will try to remember to take some.

Rich
 

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Discussion Starter #18
We'll be waiting.
 
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