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My grandpa has an ‘06 Corvette with about 5500 miles on it. Hasn’t been driven in a number of years

Think it is ok to get it running and drive it up to a Corvette shop near my house (60 miles- all highway) for fluid change and a once over or better off trailering it? Fairly certain the oil in this vehicle is synthetic. Im not sure if it has ever been changed - if it has, it was over ten years ago at this point

Thanks !
 

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Look at the condition of the oil. Is it black or does it look fairly clean?
One issue I have seen with these cars sitting, is the coolant solidifies in some areas and clogs things up. I'd start it up and let the fluids run for a while. Take it for a short cruise and monitor oil pressure and temperature.
 

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That and make sure the brakes are working good before jumping on the highway.
 

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A 2006 Corvette with 5500 miles is well worth the trouble and cost to get it on a trailer or flatbed tow truck. The guys at the Corvette shop should be telling you this.

That is so cool! There are folks who would love to find such a car if it is in good shape other than needing basic service. Some pictures would be appreciated very much!
 

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Having owned several Vettes a 06 should have full Synthetc . That's the least thing to worry about. I would get a trailer and tow it. Completely flush the brake system. Drain Fuel tank and flush those lines. Watch for a plugged injector. watch Tires for DRY ROT. If you rent a trailer watch the front end when you load it and take it off. Good Luck and congrats on the nice car.
 

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Tow it....directly to the junkyard, where all GM products belong :poop:

Okay seriously, the first concern is not whether it'll run but rather will it make it there without wrecking. Check the tires carefully, especially the sidewalls, and also have a look at the valve stems. You don't want a blowout to put you in a ditch or oncoming traffic. Yes there are things you can do to counteract it but they depend on you reacting fast enough.

Next check out the brakes. You should be able to stand on the pedal and not have anything blow out or stick. Whatever does blow out or stick, get it fixed before driving.

Then you can turn your attention to the engine and trans. Just top off oil and coolant if needed. Check other fluids while you're there. Drain the tank and put new fuel in, and figure out a way to purge the new fuel thru the engine fuel rail. Get a fire extinguisher to keep nearby, then put a new battery in and give it a crank.

As soon as it starts look for leaks. Then drive around slowly to make sure the brakes work and such. If no problems then you can drive it to the shop.

Or.... just pony up the $80-150 to tow it and let the shop fuss over all those details. That is what I'd do. I mean if I'm gonna pay a shop to fix it then I'm not gonna try and save < $200 to avoid a tow, knowing full well the bill from the shop will probably be $2k or more after part markup and labor.
 

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Put me down for towing it. Safer and less chance of damage. If you have problems say half way you will still need to tow but now it’s an emergency because the car is stuck in traffic.
 

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Pay the $1,000-plus to get new tires put on it before you go to drive it, regardless of the tires appearance and mileage. Another reason for having it towed to the shop.

Are you getting this ready for grandpa to drive, or is becoming your car? If grandpa has just been storing it, make sure that you or he has it insured and currently registered before getting it out on the roads, even if you decide to drive it yourself to the shop. The last thing you need is to have a dry rotted tire blow and injure yourself or someone else while driving it, especially without insurance coverage.

If you do not plan on it being driven much, then a classic car insurer like Hagerty's may be a way to go. According to them, an '06 Corvette is worth around $40,000 in average comdition, and up to $70,000 in car show condition.
 

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In about 1988 I bought a 70 Challenger that I restored. It had sat for about 15 years with a rebuilt engine that had never been started. I shot some WD40 in each spark plug hole, waited a couple days and started it up. This car was stored inside a garage but not a controlled environment. I also spun the oil pump up with a drill before starting it. On older cars you can do that.

If this car was stored inside in a relatively dry environment I’d go ahead and figure out how to try and start the car with say all the spark plug wires off just to bring up some oil pressure. Than I’d start it. I would change the oil first and check the antifreeze, brake fluid tires etc.

If it wasn’t stored the greatest I’d get something better than WD40 to spray in the spark plug holes. Amsoil makes some engine fog for example.

A pic of when I first tried to start my 70 Challenger. The distributor was 180 degrees off resulting in an excellent backfire.
Art Heat Gas Glass Fire
 

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By the way, if the responsibility of getting that Vette going is to much, I’ll show up with my trailer just have the title ready to sign over to me. ;) Pics of the car would be nice to post up to. I just saw where your from, I’ve got a sister in Eau Claire, your hardly out of the way.
 
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I would probably have it carefully towed by a reputable tow service.
If you were talking a few blocks, then maybe drain the fuel tank put fresh gas and battery in it make sure the brakes are working and easy it a few blocks down the road.
60 miles however, is a bit too risky IMO.
 
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Flatbed Towtruck will be way cheaper than .
Stuck brakes
bad fuel in everything
blown tire
etc......then towed from bfe to wherever

If its been in a controlled environment...that helps a bunch.
It may start ,run and drive just fine.

If the Shop don't have the concerns were having...That may not be the best shop to deal with.


Need more details on the storage ....how and where? was it run periodicly .was Grandpa anal and put fuel stabilizer in ...etc.
 

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I'm surprised that nobody asked what "a number of years" means. That could mean 3 years, or 15 years. Big difference.
 

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Not sure how full your tank is… Or if it even matters. I would be very reluctant to drive that car that far because I would be too afraid of the fuel contamination. Most gasoline has shelf life of 6-12 months before it starts to degrade. There is a possibility that whoever put gas in it last put ethanol free gas in, which buys you a little time. But not several years. Even if it runs great I would pay to have the tank dropped, remaining fuel emptied, and the tank inspected before re-installation. You’ll never run into as many problems with the gas motor as you will an diesel when it come to old fuel. But that isn’t just any gas motor either. I’m not a Corvette specialist, but I would be very leery of running six year old fuel through that engine and fuel system.
 

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The 70 Dodge I was talking about had very bad fuel in the tank. I pulled the tank and dumped it. I assume the Vette has a plastic tank but after I got my car going for a year, it suddenly had rust breaking free and would plug the filter immediately. I was able to coat the tank and save it but it was steel. If the car stored well it might not be that bad to get it going.
 
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