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I can pick it up Saturday :ROFLMAO:

I'm in the "get it towed" camp too.
The heck with Kenny, I can be there in less than 2 hours and I make old things run. :ROFLMAO:
Have it towed on a rollback.
 
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks for all the input guys. I’m going to be down there next weekend and will take a few pictures then. It is in like new condition with exception of a few creases in the seat from getting in and out of it. It was stored in their insulated but not climate controlled garage. My grandpa was not fussy about maintenance, so no fuel stabilizer (I kept it washed and waxed when I was a kid and he was still driving it every so often)

I’m going to get it towed to be on the safe side. As a few of you mentioned, would hate to have something break down or a tire blow at highway speed. Worth the few extra bucks to avoid that

Thanks again!
 

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Those have 2 fuel tanks with a crossover pipe. Siphon system drains one side before it starts in on the other. Also 2 fuel level senders - 1 in each tank (that are prone to going bad). If you are going to pull the tanks for any reason might want to inquire about replacing those proactively. Not sure if GM updated the parts or not. Dex-cool is supposedly good for 5 years/150k, maybe with the vehicle not being run the stuff hasn't deteriorated to the point where it got acidic and whatever else can go wrong with it. Brakes are super easy to bleed on them. I wouldn't be suprised if the brakes are just fine (aluminum with steel pistons). If it's one of the performance variants, many pistons. Obviously the battery will be toast, even new these cars like to drain the battery, strongly recommend a Tender if it's going to be not driven for more than 30 days. Tires 'should' be replaced after 6 according to tire industry folks....who want to sell you tires. 6-speed or slush-box? If it's a manual, the CAGS 'skip shift' takes a bit getting used to but that depends on how you drive. These have a lot more torque than when that was first introduced, so it's not as bad.

Let us know how you make out.

----------------

"However, major car manufacturers including Audi, BMW, Buick, Dodge, Ford, Jeep, Mercedes Benz, Toyota and VW now recommend on their websites and in owner handbooks that tires be replaced after six years.

As a result, many tire chains won't touch seven-year-old tires because of liability issues. "
 

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Thanks for all the input guys. I’m going to be down there next weekend and will take a few pictures then. It is in like new condition with exception of a few creases in the seat from getting in and out of it. It was stored in their insulated but not climate controlled garage. My grandpa was not fussy about maintenance, so no fuel stabilizer (I kept it washed and waxed when I was a kid and he was still driving it every so often)

I’m going to get it towed to be on the safe side. As a few of you mentioned, would hate to have something break down or a tire blow at highway speed. Worth the few extra bucks to avoid that

Thanks again!
I'll give you my two cents for free.

I store my 2008 Corvette for months often; it's a convertible with a layup policy. I've had it sitting for a year due to health issues.

Tires aside, I'd surely have no hesitation cranking and then starting and running the car AFTER removing the fuel pump relay from the fuse box to first re-prime the engine. I've had other Chebby LS engined fun cars and I'd follow this if the car's been sitting for months... or years.

I would get a fresh battery (which is $150-200), jump start it and then spin the engine over with the fuel pump relay removed to get oil to the bearings and to the lifters. The inside of the fuse box cover will have the fuel pump relay #. Make sure you orient the box cover to match the fuse and breaker layout before pulling it since the numbering may be confusing if you don't know Vettes.

To me, dry start is your #1 concern and one that I am not sure even a garage would "care" about.

I know some (many) may not agree with me but coming from a background of years of owning a fair weather car that does not see a lot of yearly miles, if the tires showed no sign of wear or cracking or rot I certainly would not replace them simply based upon their age. With that said, Corvettes can wear front tires very strangely so I would get the front end up or the tires turned out and look closely at the inside of the tread. That to me would be more concern than a tire that sat six years.
 

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As Rule292 stated, split fuel tanks. The torque tube, exhaust and rear end- transmission are typically dropped at dealerships to service the fuel tanks but I think guys have found ways to wrestle them out besides that.
The fuel level sending units used a silver rheostat that suffered a reaction to some fuel additives and oxygen.
If you hold the gas pedal to the floor you can crank the engine as long as you want to gain oil pressure before starting.
I would tow it without starting it.
Suck out old fuel without dropping the tanks, you will find out later if the sending units are crusted, recommend storing the car for over winter and such topped off with non ethanol.
Do the fuel rail "canned" injector cleaner procedure once the car is safely running.
Tires.
If manual transmission there are remedies for the skip shift, I used a special replacement fuse until I had mine tuned and the tuner turned it off for good.
Change all fluids after you get them circulated a while.
Once you replace the battery you should have to perform the simple window index procedure found in the owners manual. This drops the side window slightly when the door is opened and closes it completely when the door is shut, I guess the glass interferes with both roofs without this, not sure, I own a coupe.
Be sure to keep us updated!
 
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I'll add another vote to the "trailer it" option. While cars can sit for a while and be "fine" depending on where they sat towing them to a good mechanic is always the wisest option.

Of course, I say that but I'll be driving my 2007 Colorado to a mechanic once I get it all cleaned up. It has only been sitting for about a year though and I've been watching it like a hawk. Probably not the smartest idea but I won't be taking highways so the fastest road will only be 35mph. If I get really bad news then I'll call my dad to borrow his trailer to take the truck down to them. Then I'll make it clear that the truck isn't for sale to the salesmen (it has less than 100K on it and is in really good condition) who always bother me to sell it.
 

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As Rule292 stated, split fuel tanks. The torque tube, exhaust and rear end- transmission are typically dropped at dealerships to service the fuel tanks but I think guys have found ways to wrestle them out besides that.
The fuel level sending units used a silver rheostat that suffered a reaction to some fuel additives and oxygen.
If you hold the gas pedal to the floor you can crank the engine as long as you want to gain oil pressure before starting.
I would tow it without starting it.
Suck out old fuel without dropping the tanks, you will find out later if the sending units are crusted, recommend storing the car for over winter and such topped off with non ethanol.
Do the fuel rail "canned" injector cleaner procedure once the car is safely running.
Tires.
If manual transmission there are remedies for the skip shift, I used a special replacement fuse until I had mine tuned and the tuner turned it off for good.
Change all fluids after you get them circulated a while.
Once you replace the battery you should have to perform the simple window index procedure found in the owners manual. This drops the side window slightly when the door is opened and closes it completely when the door is shut, I guess the glass interferes with both roofs without this, not sure, I own a coupe.
Be sure to keep us updated!
Actually it was @JDGreen-n-Yellow that had all the good C6 advice, as have you.

Great to mention the window indexing, that will certainly be an issue with the car sitting as would be the key fob and how to start the car. The CAGS fuse is a simple solder-in-a-resistor fix thanks to folks like LERES on CF.

I'd be leery of the average garage knowing any more about how to service a Corvette over a Corolla. Doubt they would know or understand the dual fuel tanks on a Corvette (and why you never try to "top off" a Vette tank when the pump clicks off).

One of the better times to learn to do it yourself.

And in case it hasn't been mentioned, the first thing to learn is how to use jacking pucks to lift the car as to not crack rocker panels as the frame rails are slightly inset below the rocker level.
 
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Having owned "fair weather" cars including older vettes, as you already stated, I would have it towed if I couldn't do the work myself. To many things can go wrong, not worth it. Maybe get ready to spend a few bucks though with tires, (I would definitely opt for new tires), brakes if not stainless calipers which they should be anyway, taking the tanks down and draining. The rest would be general maintenance issues and hopefully no mouse issues. Keep it under a buck 50 for the first 100 miles when you get it back.. ;) Happy motoring..
 

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I've owned my 2006 C6 Corvette since 2008 (bought it from an FBI agent that bought it new) and at 94,000 miles 14 years later has been the best and most fun car I've ever owned (out of many dozens of cars over over 50 years).

I didn't read all of the above, but have it flat bedded to a shop that knows Corvettes and have all the fluids checked and systems tested. With all the self diagnostics, this is easily done.

To ask more specific questions, open an account here and get all the right help: C6 Corvette General Discussion - CorvetteForum - Chevrolet Corvette Forum Discussion

Good luck.
 

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Maybe I'm dense (don't ask Mrs. Rule292 though!) but what will trailering it to a dealer accomplish?

The car comes from the factory with runflats. If you've ever seen a cross section of a ZP tire, they're practically a forklift tire. A blowout at anything less than highway speeds... or at normal highway speeds... is unlikely unless the tires are physically rotting off the rims.

The fluids are generally oil based and don't "turn to water" or gold if they sit for more than a few months. Yes, brake fluid can by hygroscopic but once again that's a "run it and change it" thing.

In the past people didn't tow barn finds or gramps old Buick to a dealer. They threw a battery in, squirted some oil in the spark plug holes, spun it over a few times to get up oil pressure to the cam, rod and main bearings and to coat the cylinder walls/rings and then fired it up with a cough and a cloud of smoke.

There is a time to err on the side of caution for safety. That I understand. I can't see any benefit to spending tons of money for a solution without a problem.

Certainly an oil change before fireup and warmup could be warranted but I really see no benefit to trailering a car that simply needs started, ran and fluids changed.
 

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Maybe I'm dense (don't ask Mrs. Rule292 though!) but what will trailering it to a dealer accomplish?

The car comes from the factory with runflats. If you've ever seen a cross section of a ZP tire, they're practically a forklift tire. A blowout at anything less than highway speeds... or at normal highway speeds... is unlikely unless the tires are physically rotting off the rims.

The fluids are generally oil based and don't "turn to water" or gold if they sit for more than a few months. Yes, brake fluid can by hygroscopic but once again that's a "run it and change it" thing.

In the past people didn't tow barn finds or gramps old Buick to a dealer. They threw a battery in, squirted some oil in the spark plug holes, spun it over a few times to get up oil pressure to the cam, rod and main bearings and to coat the cylinder walls/rings and then fired it up with a cough and a cloud of smoke.

There is a time to err on the side of caution for safety. That I understand. I can't see any benefit to spending tons of money for a solution without a problem.

Certainly an oil change before fireup and warmup could be warranted but I really see no benefit to trailering a car that simply needs started, ran and fluids changed.
I agree with you on the fluids with the exception of the fuel. I thought this may have not started in 6-7 years, maybe I'm wrong?
Many barn finds are in poor condition and when they are moved they encounter a complete rebuild or at least a thorough service. I wouldn't want to treat a mint vehicle to digesting such old fuel if I could help it.
Perhaps the OP could get a hand from someone with goo knowledge and they could avoid the towing and use the cars fuel pump to empty the tanks and at least start with fresh fuel?
 
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I'm not sure why the extensive hand wringing about whether to flat bed or not - it's a minor issue, not the center of this problem, and is not expensive and can save ingesting fluids that have gone bad in the time since they were last renewed and replaced.

Just draining and refilling the two saddle gas tanks on a C6 Corvette will cost more than a flat bed tow. Ingesting gas that has gone bad can cost much much more.

If the car has been sitting with old brake fluid (which is hygroscopic) a brake system rebuild on these cars can be very costly, in particular the ABS module which is a few thousand dollars to replace. Do you know if the car has ever had the brake fluid flushed?

Ditto with old GM organic coolant (which I dislike) which can turn into a gooey mess that one should not start the car without checking it out first - a replacement LS2 engine plus labor would be several thousand dollars which could result from an overheated engine (these are aluminum engines). Again, if this coolant is 16 years old, be wary.

Yeah, but know the actual condition of the car and fluids before one decides on whether to just go for it and save the flat bed costs or risk replacing lots of expensive systems on a 16 year old car that has not been driven in years. FWIW, unless the C6 is a Z06 it's probably only worth about $20-24K max.

Good luck with whatever you decide. (y)
 

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I'm not sure why the extensive hand wringing about whether to flat bed or not - it's a minor issue, not the center of this problem, and is not expensive and can save ingesting fluids that have gone bad in the time since they were last renewed and replaced.

Just draining and refilling the two saddle gas tanks on a C6 Corvette will cost more than a flat bed tow. Ingesting gas that has gone bad can cost much much more.

If the car has been sitting with old brake fluid (which is hygroscopic) a brake system rebuild on these cars can be very costly, in particular the ABS module which is a few thousand dollars to replace. Do you know if the car has ever had the brake fluid flushed?

Ditto with old GM organic coolant (which I dislike) which can turn into a gooey mess that one should not start the car without checking it out first - a replacement LS2 engine plus labor would be several thousand dollars which could result from an overheated engine (these are aluminum engines). Again, if this coolant is 16 years old, be wary.

Yeah, but know the actual condition of the car and fluids before one decides on whether to just go for it and save the flat bed costs or risk replacing lots of expensive systems on a 16 year old car that has not been driven in years. FWIW, unless the C6 is a Z06 it's probably only worth about $20-24K max.

Good luck with whatever you decide. (y)
The flatbedding isn't the issue.

It's the raping that's going to come from unnecessary makework.

Or the damage from a garage unfamiliar with all of the quirks of a Corvette.
 

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The flatbedding isn't the issue.

It's the raping that's going to come from unnecessary makework.

Or the damage from a garage unfamiliar with all of the quirks of a Corvette.
Agree that the flat bedding is a smokescreen.

That's why I said take it to a Corvette knowledgeable shop. No need for unnecessary work. (y) (y)(y)

Mine's only been to an outside shop once in 14 years. I do my own work.
 

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Agree that the flat bedding is a smokescreen.

That's why I said take it to a Corvette knowledgeable shop. No need for unnecessary work. (y) (y)(y)

Mine's only been to an outside shop once in 14 years. I do my own work.
Absolutely agree! Not everyone wants to get greasy but I would see this as an opportunity to "become one" with the new ride.

Living in a private state inspection state I am aware of what kind of fishing expeditions can happen when a shop smells money. I hate it when folks are ripped off on makework stuff when major issues that can have costly consequences aren't addressed.

The thread is a good one though since it is has lots of good Corvette specific info that folks don't think of that haven't owned one and experienced the idiosyncrasies of the breed.
 

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Absolutely agree! Not everyone wants to get greasy but I would see this as an opportunity to "become one" with the new ride.

Living in a private state inspection state I am aware of what kind of fishing expeditions can happen when a shop smells money. I hate it when folks are ripped off on makework stuff when major issues that can have costly consequences aren't addressed.

The thread is a good one though since it is has lots of good Corvette specific info that folks don't think of that haven't owned one and experienced the idiosyncrasies of the breed.
I hate unscrupulous "wealth transfers" when some a**wipe tries or succeeds in selling unnecessary goods and services to the unsuspecting.

You gotta guard against these types full time. I could tell dozens of stories.
 

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I'd just call AAA and have them send out a roll-back. If no AAA then the cost of an independent hauler would be $$ well spent for the Vett's sake, not to mention any liability should things go bad trying to drive it.
 

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My grandpa has an ‘06 Corvette with about 5500 miles on it. Hasn’t been driven in a number of years

Think it is ok to get it running and drive it up to a Corvette shop near my house (60 miles- all highway) for fluid change and a once over or better off trailering it? Fairly certain the oil in this vehicle is synthetic. Im not sure if it has ever been changed - if it has, it was over ten years ago at this point

Thanks !
Look in the glove compartment for a letter and then put a recording of "Riding with Pvt. Malone" on the stereo.
I agree with most of the other comments; that car is worth trailering to a good Corvette shop and get all the fluids flushed and refilled; new tires, new battery, and new serpentine belt. Also a careful check of brake pads and all brake components. It's fine to be anxious to get on the road, but you'll enjoy it a lot more if it'll be trouble free. Congratulations! You're blessed with a great grandpa!
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Minor update - Found a local shop that does a lot of work with performance cars and a tow company that will bring it up here for 400 bucks. The shop did work on the tow guy’s Z06, and he was happy with them.

Am going to talk to the shop further this week to get a gauge on their expertise based on some of the things I learned from this thread - thanks again everyone for your input…did not know a lot of the things that were mentioned here

Will post a few pictures next weekend when I’m down at their house 👍
 

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My grandpa has an ‘06 Corvette with about 5500 miles on it. Hasn’t been driven in a number of years

Think it is ok to get it running and drive it up to a Corvette shop near my house (60 miles- all highway) for fluid change and a once over or better off trailering it? Fairly certain the oil in this vehicle is synthetic. Im not sure if it has ever been changed - if it has, it was over ten years ago at this point

Thanks !
If it were me and it ain't, I would fire it up put gramps shotgun pop 2 Busch give it 2 revs and send it. It will be the best 60 miles of OGs life
 
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