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It looks broken, I wouldn't think the bearing should be separated like that from the housing. I would not engage the mid pto with it like that.

If there is one decision I will never regret...it was to not get the auto-connect.
 

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Check out this thread, especially post #4, for a large break down of parts for the drive shaft.. I know that only answers half your question, but I have never taken one apart so I'm not sure how it's assembled. I went out and looked at mine. It looks like the bearing is pressed into the casting. Mine shows a couple of marks where some one staked the bearing in place...

DSCF7835.JPG

DSCF7834.JPG



http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/12424-broken-adjustment-bolt-auto-connect-mid-mount-mower.html#post116949

I'm sure someone will have an answer.

Good luck.


And , it looks like you can get a bearing and housing assembly....

Captureshaft.JPG
 

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Check out this thread, especially post #4, for a large break down of parts for the drive shaft.. I know that only answers half your question, but I have never taken one apart so I'm not sure how it's assembled. I went out and looked at mine. It looks like the bearing is pressed into the casting. Mine shows a couple of marks where some one staked the bearing in place...

View attachment 336730

View attachment 336738



http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/12424-broken-adjustment-bolt-auto-connect-mid-mount-mower.html#post116949

I'm sure someone will have an answer.

Good luck.


And , it looks like you can get a bearing and housing assembly....

View attachment 336746
Remove the coupler from the tractor, use a vise or heavy block of wood, align the bearing in the coupler and tap in with a shop hammer. It's easy, I had to replace the coupler on mine a few years ago, you might want to stake it in a few spots as shown in the photo.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, guys

I knew this forum would get back to me pronto.

Joe, does the coupler disconnect at the u-joint, or do I need to take out the whole shaft? Also, how would I go about "staking" the coupler in place?

I have the local JD dealer looking into the price and availability of the coupler also.
 

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You have to disconnect from the tractor side. Pulled back on yoke and you should be able to pull the coupler from the driveshaft .

Wish you luck never had that happen to mine.
 

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Also, how would I go about "staking" the coupler in place?


In the picture you see two little dimples around the edge of the beering. These move the metal over to hold the beering in place. That is called "staking" you can use a punch or even a chisel to achieve this. It's an old time practice. At Farmall i used the corner of a chisel to do this on the front wheel hubs.
 

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Looking at the picture in the linked post, it looks like the drive shaft is held in to the bearing assembly with a snap ring. I think in order to pull the shaft out of the assembly, you'd have to remove the snap ring first.

I'd take it all off the tractor to work on it. You won't know if something is broken without getting a good look at it. That whole deck lift assembly is removed by removing 4 pins.

DSCF7836 - Copy1.JPG

If you plan to use the tractor for something before you get this fixed, I'd remove the adjustable turn buckles from the tractor and set them aside. But remember which side they came from and how they were positioned on the tractor. You don't want to turn the threaded portion into the base or the deck lift will go out of adjustment.

DSCF7837 - Copy.JPG


Once it's off, you'll have a better idea of how much it needs to come apart in order to get the bearing back into the housing. If you have to remove the shaft, it should be just a matter of removing the snap ring, #5 in the parts picture...

DSCF7841.JPG

...with something like this.

Capturesrp.JPG

And getting the bearing staked back into the housing...


Good luck.

You might want to check with your dealer and see if your under warranty. They'd fix it up and if they had the deck, they could make sure everything is set up correctly. I'm sure this has a lot to do with the banging noises from your mulching kit experience.
 

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Looking at the picture in the linked post, it looks like the drive shaft is held in to the bearing assembly with a snap ring. I think in order to pull the shaft out of the assembly, you'd have to remove the snap ring first.

I'd take it all off the tractor to work on it. You won't know if something is broken without getting a good look at it. That whole deck lift assembly is removed by removing 4 pins.

View attachment 337106

If you plan to use the tractor for something before you get this fixed, I'd remove the adjustable turn buckles from the tractor and set them aside. But remember which side they came from and how they were positioned on the tractor. You don't want to turn the threaded portion into the base or the deck lift will go out of adjustment.

View attachment 337114


Once it's off, you'll have a better idea of how much it needs to come apart in order to get the bearing back into the housing. If you have to remove the shaft, it should be just a matter of removing the snap ring, #5 in the parts picture...

View attachment 337130

...with something like this.

View attachment 337122

And getting the bearing staked back into the housing...


Good luck.

You might want to check with your dealer and see if your under warranty. They'd fix it up and if they had the deck, they could make sure everything is set up correctly. I'm sure this has a lot to do with the banging noises from your mulching kit experience.
A much easier way is to unbolt the four bolts on the straps, then uncouple from the tractor (just slide the locking ring forward and twist), now you will have the bearing support and drive shaft, align the bearing with the coupler and tap back into place. Note: Take note on how the four bolts are installed. Also if you separate the drive shaft note the position of the universal joints (might want to mare these so you get the indexing correct). Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks

Thanks for all the prompt replies. I'll probably fiddle with it this afternoon since this is the last chance to get the mowing done before the wedding reception in my back yard. Fortunately the grass isn't very high yet. And yes, this is definitely the source of the noise I was hearing - it had nothing to do with the mulch kit. What fooled me was the fact that I had connected and disconnected in the past without issue and the mower was working fine. I can't figure out how this happened since it appears to have been a hit from the back, and that has never happened. There is some wear on the u-joint behind the coupler where it must have been rubbing.

Forgive the newbie stuff, but this is new to me. What does "tapping" it back in to place mean? Is it really tapping, or am I going to have to give it a good pounding? And should I grease it before I start "tapping"? And what is a "shop hammer"?

Thanks again.
 

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"Ball staking" is what you need to do. Normally three ball stakes are minimum and five max based on the diameter of the bearing. Do not use a punch with a sharp point to displace the material as this causes stress cracks in the outer material and after time will profigate until failure. Take a small 1/4 inch punch to a grinder and round the end (but don't over heat it or it will become dead soft) and then stake your outer retainer in three to four spots. Don't get to close to the edge next to the bearing as the lack of staking material will cause it to crack as well. Never restate in the same area.
This type of staking was/is used in the Aerospace Industry and if you Google it you should find examples. Its not as popular anymore and has been replaced with "Anvil and roll staking".

Bearing Staking, Removal & Testing Tools - NPB
 

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Thanks for all the prompt replies. I'll probably fiddle with it this afternoon since this is the last chance to get the mowing done before the wedding reception in my back yard. Fortunately the grass isn't very high yet. And yes, this is definitely the source of the noise I was hearing - it had nothing to do with the mulch kit. What fooled me was the fact that I had connected and disconnected in the past without issue and the mower was working fine. I can't figure out how this happened since it appears to have been a hit from the back, and that has never happened. There is some wear on the u-joint behind the coupler where it must have been rubbing.

Forgive the newbie stuff, but this is new to me. What does "tapping" it back in to place mean? Is it really tapping, or am I going to have to give it a good pounding? And should I grease it before I start "tapping"? And what is a "shop hammer"?

Thanks again.
Sorry for taking so long to get back with you, "tapping" a firm but not aggressive hit. "Should I grease it before I start "tapping"?" NO! Do not apply any grease, this is a press fit. A shop hammer is about two pounds with a head on both ends, sorry I don't have a picture of one. "There is some wear on the u-joint behind the coupler where it must have been rubbing." Be sure to check the bearing support for any signs of wear, if any are present replace the carrier. Hope this helps, and don't hesitate to ask questions, the folks on this forum are the best I've seen and are always eager to help. Joe
 

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Also, how would I go about "staking" the coupler in place?


In the picture you see two little dimples around the edge of the beering. These move the metal over to hold the beering in place. That is called "staking" you can use a punch or even a chisel to achieve this. It's an old time practice. At Farmall i used the corner of a chisel to do this on the front wheel hubs.
:dunno: drifterbike--i have never heard of "staking before in my life" we always just called it (pinging) same thing. i used to ping my races on wheel bearings in my big truck, all the time back when i owned one. so i learned something new again-thanks!

i can't remember for sure what i used. i'm thinking a small pointed punch:dunno:
 

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I wouldn't take the linkage arm assembly off. It is too easy for the height adjusting yokes to turn---which sets the mower height from side to side.

Here is the installation manual for the driveshaft:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Not for the faint of heart

Purists should not continue reading - this is going to get ugly. Here is how I solved the problem without removing anything from the tractor (sorry, no pics): I put a large C clamp on the bearing and the outter fitting at the 12 o'clock and the 4 o'clock positions . I then took my normal hammer and began tapping (pounding?) the 8 o'clock position. A couple of pounds with the hammer, tighten the clamps. A couple of pounds with the hammer, tighten the clamps. Took about ten minutes to put the bearing back in place in this manner, with no apparent damage. Fiddled with the adjustment bolt enough to get an easy auto connect, and then went out and did the necessary mowing for the reception. Due to the time crunch did not have time to adjust the entire system and did no staking, but I have time now to get to that. All for naught, since the outdoor reception was moved indoors (after it started) due to weather, but a good lesson learned.
 

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You might want to invest in a rubber or nylon mallet for that task of tapping the bearing back into place, to avoid damage. A steel hammer can easily mess things up in a hurry.


There is also option B, you could take my controversial advice of scrapping that auto connect completely and replacing it with the manual-connect driveshaft. :dance:


Lastly, and no disrespect intended, if you're not confident in doing this repair yourself, you might want to consider having a shop do it. I say this because if that thing were to come apart, and the pto shaft breaks, you could be facing a major repair. Someone else here had that shaft come apart with the auto connect, the u joint broke and it went flailing and ripped the filter off the transmission and cost thousands to be fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
No offense taken

Ajgrn78, I hear you. I'm not clear on which repair you are referring to, but I felt confident about putting the bearing back in place, and it held up well mowing about 3 acres last night. Believe me, I'll be keeping a closer eye on it now that this happened. I'm actually glad that it did because it forced me to study the system and I understand it a lot better now. The tractor is now like all the cars that I have owned: I understand the systems that fail.
 
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