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Discussion Starter #1
Due to our crazy weather I planted none of my ground this year. I'm looking to put wheat in one field. I worked it down once this spring, it was chisel plowed in the fall to get ready for corn. I don't want to leave it empty all summer and have weeds come back. Was thinking of seeding a cover into it. I didn't think another small grain was a good idea to put on it before wheat. Any recommendations?
 

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Legume

Due to our crazy weather I planted none of my ground this year. I'm looking to put wheat in one field. I worked it down once this spring, it was chisel plowed in the fall to get ready for corn. I don't want to leave it empty all summer and have weeds come back. Was thinking of seeding a cover into it. I didn't think another small grain was a good idea to put on it before wheat. Any recommendations?
That's a backwards situation from our usual practice in this area where wheat is sometimes used as a winter cover crop.

Anyway, I'd look for a legume if you want to put some nitrogen in the soil. A clover, vetch etc. would do it.

Kings has a pretty good guide: https://www.kingsagriseeds.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Final-2018-PIG.pdf

Treefarmer
 

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I would go with buckwheat all day long. Must faster to establish than clover, makes tons of biomass, easy to kill off by tillage or frost and grows incredibly well in Michigan summers. One good rain after seeding and it will germinate and put up a good temporary stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Due to our crazy weather I planted none of my ground this year. I'm looking to put wheat in one field. I worked it down once this spring, it was chisel plowed in the fall to get ready for corn. I don't want to leave it empty all summer and have weeds come back. Was thinking of seeding a cover into it. I didn't think another small grain was a good idea to put on it before wheat. Any recommendations?
That's a backwards situation from our usual practice in this area where wheat is sometimes used as a winter cover crop.

Anyway, I'd look for a legume if you want to put some nitrogen in the soil. A clover, vetch etc. would do it.

Kings has a pretty good guide: https://www.kingsagriseeds.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Final-2018-PIG.pdf

Treefarmer
It's a winter cover crop here too if in the spring it looks terrible haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would go with buckwheat all day long. Must faster to establish than clover, makes tons of biomass, easy to kill off by tillage or frost and grows incredibly well in Michigan summers. One good rain after seeding and it will germinate and put up a good temporary stand.
Funny you mention that. I thought about it as I also keep bees on the other side of the road from the field.
 

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Would oats be a poor choice as a cover before wheat?
The problem with any grassy cover crop is the volunteer crop you will have next year, especially if you are not haying the cover crop.
 

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After buckwheat was mentioned, I went looking for some to order,, and found this,,

https://thefeedandseed.com/

Kinda a home based business,, I like to support those,, so I ordered 15 pounds,,
that ought to be enough for the part of my garden that has nothing growing in it,,, :dunno:
 

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Buckwheat is one of my favorite warm season crops if I missed spring planting or decided to prep a field for fall planting during the summer. Nothing else I have tried establishes so easy or can withstand deer damage as well. It can usually be found at local co-ops or feed stores and if not there it looks like you can get it online as well.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's what I figured was wrong with oats. Wouldn't want them in the wheat. Our local feed elevator should carry it.
 

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Buckwheat and bees

Funny you mention that. I thought about it as I also keep bees on the other side of the road from the field.
I know some beekeepers that plant buckwheat just for the bees and the unique honey. It might be a double win in your case.

Treefarmer
 
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