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Discussion Starter #1
So while I was installing my new rear work light, I accidentally shorted my wrench across the +/- terminals of the battery (got a quick jolt)

Overall the tractor seems fine, but I did notice that when I engage the Parking brake, the light no longer comes on indicating the parking brake is engaged. However that same light DOES come on when I cycle the ignition (so I know the bulb isn't blown.)

Any ideas where I should look to fix this? I'm assuming this happened when I shorted the battery (was attaching the neg wire to the battery and just got a little sloppy handling my open end wrench - next time I'll put a cloth across the + terminal to make sure I can't hit it.)
 

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Make sure the switch for the parking brake light is adjusted correctly. Check for blown fuses. If all that is good start checking for voltage at the switch and work your was back to the battery.


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There's gotta be a switch on the parking brake lever somewhere that controls that indicator lamp. I'd try jumping that switch and see what happens as a quick starting point.

I don't have access to a wiring diagram to see the fuse allocations and where fusible links might be... Hopefully someone will chime in with one.
 

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What model do you have? I don't believe my 1026R has a parking brake light, so now you have me thinking! Do they all have them?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1025R - by parking brake light - I mean the idiot light in the instrument panel that indicates it' s engaged. It works when the ignition is cycled, just doesn't illuminate when I engage the brake. It's wierd.

I was thinking I had blown the fuse or bulb, but the fact that it works just fine when cycling the ignition means the circuit should be fine.
 

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Yup, we're on the same page... Hmmmmm, I don't remember seeing the dash light for the parking brake on my machine. I'm gonna go check because I want a light too if I don't have one, lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Look for it in the lower RH corner of the display - Circle with a P in it.

I'm thinking there must be a relay or something between the pedal and the battery so that the power still goes to the idiot light when the ignition is cycled (not getting a signal from PB, but from start-up), but it doesn't when the brake is set.
 

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Yup, we're on the same page... Hmmmmm, I don't remember seeing the dash light for the parking brake on my machine. I'm gonna go check because I want a light too if I don't have one, lol!
Late 2012 1026r here and mine has the brake light. Stays on as long as the key is on and the brake latch is engaged. Does not light when brake is being used as "brake". Check for switch... on the latch linkage???? (maybe..?)
 

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Maybe need a reset

Just about everything has a microprocessor in it nowdays. The dash on the 1025R appears to have one judging from the rpm display and the way the indicators test themselves at startup. When you shorted the battery momentarily, the program in the microprocessor could have crashed. I would try disconnecting the battery for about a minute and then reconnecting it. This should allow the microprocessor to reboot properly. It may be all that you need to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You know what? I think I know what I did. I remember now disconnecting a single circuit under the lower cowl when I was routing the wire through the engine and back to the ROPS. I don't think I plugged that sucker back in after I finished up the routing. :slap-yourself-emoti

Out of country on a business trip at the moment and will have to check it when I get home. 99% sure that's the culprit. Thanks.:peace:
 

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Unless you were soaking wet you should not have received a jolt and even then it would be tiny at best. There is only 12 volts of push behind that battery. Your skins high resistance should keep you insulated. That's the reason you can touch both the positive and negative terminals at the same time without problems.
 

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Actually that should be because you're not grounded. He may have grounded himself with his other hand etc which would give a little bigger jolt. But regardless if you short the battery with a conductor such as a metal wrench it's gonna shock you. Just like shorting a 9 volt battery with your tongue. It's not big but it does shock you.

If you're sure that you left that wire or whatever disconnected then it should come back on that was probably the problem. Though it could be any number of things mentioned here if it doesn't fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Actually that should be because you're not grounded. He may have grounded himself with his other hand etc which would give a little bigger jolt. But regardless if you short the battery with a conductor such as a metal wrench it's gonna shock you. Just like shorting a 9 volt battery with your tongue. It's not big but it does shock you.

If you're sure that you left that wire or whatever disconnected then it should come back on that was probably the problem. Though it could be any number of things mentioned here if it doesn't fix it.
I'm almost positive that's what I did. I'll fix it on Friday when I get back. I was trying to keep the wire routing as tight as I could to keep it up and out of the way and had wrapped the harness in a nice thick protective sleeve (not the corrugated plastic kind, but more of a woven fiber type.) I had to remove the connector to get the harness through a hole and behind that connector. Pretty sure I then went about zip tying the harness up and out of the way, pulling out the slack and never got back to plugging it in.

As for the shock - the wrench spanned the terminals and I definitely got a little shock - nothing like the one I got from a 50,000V Mallory ignition module (buddy cranking the ignition while I checked for spark with a screwdriver stuck in the spark plug wire looking for an arc to the block and accidentally let my elbow touch the fender......holy chit that one hurt.) but a shock nonetheless. Thanks guys.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Actually that should be because you're not grounded. He may have grounded himself with his other hand etc which would give a little bigger jolt. But regardless if you short the battery with a conductor such as a metal wrench it's gonna shock you. Just like shorting a 9 volt battery with your tongue. It's not big but it does shock you.

If you're sure that you left that wire or whatever disconnected then it should come back on that was probably the problem. Though it could be any number of things mentioned here if it doesn't fix it.
If you short the battery with a wrench you are touching you should not get shocked because the wrenchs' path to ground has far less resistance than your body. The current will pass through the path of least resistance. sorry I didn't mean to hijack.
 

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Have you ever had any kind of class or experience in anything electronic? That is one of the first things they tell you never to do next to sticking a screwdriver into a light socket. Don't short a battery together it can shock and burn you. Same principle as holding onto jumper cables while touching them together. It completes the circuit and by touching that conductor and grounding yourself you are adding yourself to that circuit. Yeah 12-15v isn't fatal nor does it usually hurt but it is a shock none the less.
 

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Have you ever had any kind of class or experience in anything electronic? That is one of the first things they tell you never to do next to sticking a screwdriver into a light socket. Don't short a battery together it can shock and burn you. Same principle as holding onto jumper cables while touching them together. It completes the circuit and by touching that conductor and grounding yourself you are adding yourself to that circuit. Yeah 12-15v isn't fatal nor does it usually hurt but it is a shock none the less.
Hi dale, if your comment is directed to me, yes, I have electrical experience. I actually teach college level auto electricity. I was certainly not recommending anyone short battery terminals together lol. I guess I should have just kept my mouth shut when the OP said he got a shock.
 

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Have you ever had any kind of class or experience in anything electronic? That is one of the first things they tell you never to do next to sticking a screwdriver into a light socket. Don't short a battery together it can shock and burn you. Same principle as holding onto jumper cables while touching them together. It completes the circuit and by touching that conductor and grounding yourself you are adding yourself to that circuit. Yeah 12-15v isn't fatal nor does it usually hurt but it is a shock none the less.
OK, I'll play along. I've had a few classes (a few years of classes) on electricity and electronics, and a couple decades of experience. Yes 12 volts can give you a VERY tiny shock under the right conditions, but when you short something across a battery, a shock is very unlikely because (as mentioned by fuelhog) the current will favor the low resistance path of the wrench; not the high resistance path of your body. You could get a nasty burn though.
Measure the resistance between your two hands with an ohm meter, use ohms law to calculate how much current would flow if you touched both terminals of the battery, then we will talk.
 

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Must be first signs of old age, because I fired up the 1026R the other day and noticed the "P" indicator on the dash, where it must have always been... After noticing it, I remembered that I've always seen it, hahahaha!
 

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Not trying to be mean or anything guys. I'm in my 3rd year electronics class and every year that's one the first things they have told us every year. I figured that was something they tell everybody. Regardless he got a shock I've been shocked under the same conditions so eh. It can depend on the person as well.
 

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There have been times when I thought i had been shocked too. Only I realized later it was either my phone had vibrated at the same time, something had flashed in the background, my mind had envisioned I had gotten hurt,,,,,blah blah blah. It happens. It happens to the best of us. I know because I'm not the best of us and it happens to me. :lol: Regularly. :laugh:

Although it's extremely unlikely to get a shock from a low voltage system (50v or less by OSHA standards) there have been times when I thought I have been shocked. It's never been a deal because it doesn't produce any wounds. It can't. It's the nature of the voltage.
 
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