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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What brand (back in the day) made a good dozer that is cheap now? I am looking for no bigger than 35 hp. What is best JD Oliver IH :thumbup1gif:
I want it so I can make maple syrup while it is wet instead of getting the John Deere 40 stuck!
 

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I have no idea which is best. It also depends on what you want to do with it. I have a small JD MC, 1952 vintage. It's a 2 lunger "Johnny popper" and I'm amazed what I can do with it. It's also light enough so that I can paddle along on top of the snow when it gets deep. It's also small enough so I can get in around trees or other things without doing damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok I want to be able to take it through the woods to gather maple sap. We are currently using a john deere 40u but the ruts keep getting deeper and want somthing with tracks. A mc is the perfect size. How fast does the mc go approx.?
 

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It's pretty slow. Well I should clarify. It will do 5mph or so in 4th gear, but you better hang on. There's not much for a suspension. :laugh: If it's smooth, like with snow on the ground it isn't bad.

EDIT: I have a video somewhere of my daughter and daughter in-law pushing rocks out with it, but I can't seem to find it. I'll keep looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok that is what I thought I am probably going to be traveling close to a quarter to half a mile to the woods. So maybe a sore seat when i get there:laugh:
 

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It's more like riding a bucking bronco if it's rough. We used to use it for firewood and as long as there was snow cover, you could run in high gear all day. It was a little sketchy coming down a hill with a couple of trees pushing it, especially if it got a little sideways. And it was slower than the 784 we use now, but it ran great and has unbelievable torque/luggung power.
 

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Ok I want to be able to take it through the woods to gather maple sap. We are currently using a john deere 40u but the ruts keep getting deeper and want somthing with tracks. A mc is the perfect size. How fast does the mc go approx.?
Wouldn't plastic tubing be cheaper and more reliable? It's not like gravity fails that often!

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #8
we could do that but I have heard that squirrels like chewing plastic lines. If we went tubing we would have to get a pump and vaccum releaser which is quite pricey. The metal spiles and plastic buckets are not that expensive. BTW. do you know of any one that has a 2x6 wood fired evaporator? If so send me a pm.
 

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Between where I live (the mountains) and civilization there is a large swath of agricultural land. A mixture of large conventional dairy farms and the Amish. Everyone who has a sugar bush uses tubing and SS collection tanks. I have no idea how they work. It's just that the tubing maze is a thing of wonder; the tanks are always located near a road and the farmers are out collecting every evening; and the Amish seem to find work in the mid-late winter maintaining the tubing systems.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes I think it is handy! But we are only doing 250 taps at the most.. and not sure how much too invest.
 

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Back in the 50's John deer had the 420c and 430c, Oliver had the OC3 and OC6 and Cleveland tractor company (Cletrac) had a some out there too before Oliver bought them out.

You see them pop up on craigslist every once in awhile. I actually like the look of the Oliver/Cletrac OC3. It looks to have a little smaller footprint then the JDs. Biggest thing is with these is going to be parts. Oliver has been out of business for probably 30 years and the motors in the OC's is a Hercules.

My BF avery V has a Hercules and you really have to dig hard to find parts but my Oliver Super 55 I can get parts for that thing all day long.

Someday I will own one of those old crawlers just because they look like they are fun to play around on. If I don't get one I'll search for an old set of ARPS half-tracks to put on the old Oli.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Actually I have been looking at oliver/cletrac, I think I like them a bit better because they are so compact, however not sure how many had 3 point.
 

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LONG before I bought an old track machine,,,
I would be installing duals on the tractor that I have,, front and rear,,,

The flotation of duals is amazing,, and the cost is almost nothing,,, compared to keeping an old track machine running,,,

PLUS,, once the track machine has about 6 frozen track pins,, your backside will be saying,,,

"GO GET THE RUBBER TIRED TRACTOR!!" :nunu:




:laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would consider that but when the trail is just wide enough for a small utility tractor...... well... I suppose the tree would get to wear some rubber...:laugh:
 

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Actually I have been looking at oliver/cletrac, I think I like them a bit better because they are so compact, however not sure how many had 3 point.
Once in a while you can find one with some type of homemade 3 point system but for the most part crawlers are almost always drawbar in the rear with a PTO. I am in the same mindset as you. I would think a crawler with a 3 point would be ideal for mowing slopes where they just get a little too sketchy for running a tractor on.
 

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Discussion Starter #16

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The older smaller crawlers come out with 2 types of steering systems - clutch & brake like Cat D2 & D4 where you stop one track and drive the other and with this, you can turn tight corners by pivoting on one track like to getting around close trees. The other system is planetary
differential steering where, when one lever is pulled back, that side slows down while the other speeds up. There is constant drive to both tracks all the time an although much better on steep slopes, you cannot turn as sharp. An example of this is used on the Cletracs, early Olivers and David Brown crawlers. I have one of each (a 1952 Cat D4 and a David Brown 50TD) and are totally different to drive.

You may need to take this into account if getting a crawler. Also, the faster you go, the more track wear that will occur and these days, track undercarriage pares are getting difficult to find that are in reasonable condition. A positive side of tracks is that you do not get punctures and have to walk home.

I think crawlers are in my blood as I have been around them all my life and currently managing the maintenance on a fleet of 24 Cat D11s and D10s, along with another 80 Cat machines.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks a lot! I did not know there was a difference! I would definetly prefer brakes
 

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That's a lot of Cats!

The older smaller crawlers come out with 2 types of steering systems - clutch & brake like Cat D2 & D4 where you stop one track and drive the other and with this, you can turn tight corners by pivoting on one track like to getting around close trees. The other system is planetary
differential steering where, when one lever is pulled back, that side slows down while the other speeds up. There is constant drive to both tracks all the time an although much better on steep slopes, you cannot turn as sharp. An example of this is used on the Cletracs, early Olivers and David Brown crawlers. I have one of each (a 1952 Cat D4 and a David Brown 50TD) and are totally different to drive.

You may need to take this into account if getting a crawler. Also, the faster you go, the more track wear that will occur and these days, track undercarriage pares are getting difficult to find that are in reasonable condition. A positive side of tracks is that you do not get punctures and have to walk home.

I think crawlers are in my blood as I have been around them all my life and currently managing the maintenance on a fleet of 24 Cat D11s and D10s, along with another 80 Cat machines.
That's a heck of a lot of Cats, tracked or not.

Treefarmer
 

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Yes I think it is handy! But we are only doing 250 taps at the most.. and not sure how much too invest.
Can a side by side with a trailer do what you want? Seems to be a bit of overkill to use a crawler unless that's what you want.
 
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