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Corndog Hater
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We have a 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe AWD 7 passenger with the 3.3L V6. Hyundai rates it to tow 5,000lbs. We bought this vehicle mainly for the extra cargo room. The towing rating was a bonus as I had hoped to get a utility trailer for hauling lumber, mulch, etc. I still don't have that utility trailer.:unknown: We have toyed with getting a travel trailer something like this:

Rockwood Mini Lite Travel Trailers by Forest River RV

But might prefer something a little bigger:

Rockwood Mini Lite Travel Trailers by Forest River RV

I have serious reservations about towing anything "substantial" with the Santa Fe, much less buying the camper in the first place:mocking:. Obviously I need a WD hitch and anti sway setup, amongst other things. I am a member of the Hyundai forum and there are some folks towing with theirs, but they are adding air bags to the rear suspension as well as other mods and I am not about to do anything like that. We have never been truck people, but if we do decide to get a camper, I think we should get a truck or SUV. My wife is a strictly by the numbers person. I finally have it ingrained in her brain that just because Hyundai says 5,000lbs, DOES NOT mean you can go buy a 5,000lb trailer and hook it up and go, there are other things that factor into the 5,000lbs. Safety, first and foremost! Obviously, if we went with the bigger trailer, towing with the Santa Fe is out. I am just looking for some real world towing advice, and maybe some of you have pulled something with your crossover. Thanks!:good2:
 
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If safety is first,,, then 5,000 pounds means:
trailer weight
ALL cargo (in SUV and trailer!!)
Passengers weight

Just because you move the 300 pound generator from the trailer to the SUV does nothing to improve the transmission in the SUV,,,, :dunno:

Loading 6 passengers in the SUV,,,,, well,,, the engine gotta move that weight also,,,, :flag_of_truce:

Maybe the wife can leave behind the china plate setting for 8??? :thumbup1gif:

Do not forget the weight of the fishing rods,,,, I mean EVERYTHING!!
 
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My wife has a 2010 Mercury Mariner with a 3.0 V6, rated to tow 5000lbs. So far the most we have towed with it is a 5x8 utility trailer, weighing maybe 2000lbs tops, with the load we had in it, probably less. Towed fine at that weight.
 
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Corndog Hater
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Discussion Starter #4
If safety is first,,, then 5,000 pounds means:
trailer weight
ALL cargo (in SUV and trailer!!)
Passengers weight

Just because you move the 300 pound generator from the trailer to the SUV does nothing to improve the transmission in the SUV,,,, :dunno:

Loading 6 passengers in the SUV,,,,, well,,, the engine gotta move that weight also,,,, :flag_of_truce:

Maybe the wife can leave behind the china plate setting for 8??? :thumbup1gif:

Do not forget the weight of the fishing rods,,,, I mean EVERYTHING!!
It took a bit, but I finally got all of this through to Mrs. CP and she realized it did make sense. I will be showing her this thread though too. Thanks:good2:
 
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I'd go over and chat with the folks at RV.net. They tend to be a little overly paranoid IMO but when you are looking at things like max capacities when hauling around tons of "stuff" that can be a good thing.

There are smaller trailers meant to be towed with the Crossover vehicles.

I have an 8800 lb 26' RV that I tow with my Tundra and previously towed with an F250. Either truck handles it fine but things can get interesting at times. Things like a the crosswinds you get when a tractor trailer blows by you or even if you get multiple trucks passing you on both sides can cause you to need to pull over and change your under-roo's. Most trailers act as huge sails when broadsided by wind and those manufacturer's weight rating don't account for crosswinds at all.
 

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To be honest that would scare me. Even if following the specs for weight, things quickly become very different at highway speeds, cross winds, etc. I've passed units like you are speaking with when I was in my big truck and just the wind coming off my truck would make the little SUV with camper trailer start swaying.

Heck even with my F-150 with trailer tow package I would not want to go much over a 5k# camper. I have this thing that I want my tow vehicle to be heavier than what I am towing. Yeah, they say I could pull an 8k# trailer with ease but I won't do it.
 

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Corndog Hater
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks folks great info here. Mrs. CP has never driven with anything being towed and I have limited experience. I have really been watching the highways for what people are towing and with what it's being towed. I would say 95% of what I have seen are full size trucks and SUVs as tow vehicles. That says something to me. And coaltrain's comment about towing something so much bigger than the tow vehicle is a thought that has gone through my head. We aren't looking to buy the Hilton on wheels. But the thought of even a small camper behind that Santa Fe makes me shake my head. It will be definitely taller than the roofline of the Santa Fe. What's even worse is that I don't get a lot of vacation and if the winter is bad, I may use up my vacation then. I came out of this winter with 1.5 days of vacation to use the rest of this calendar year. So Mrs. CP thought she might do some traveling with the boys on her own. That makes me very nervous. But even with a truck or Tahoe, I will probably still be very worried. Ok, maybe I won't let her read this thread!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Tongue weight is big factor as well. My wife and I have thought a small hard side pop up would be great. I've seen Honda Odysseys pulling some pretty good size campers. I'm rated to tow 3500. I have the full tow package, yet my tongue weight is limited to 350 pounds. I've seen pop up campers where the tongue weight empty is 325. Add some cargo to the camper and LP tanks and I'm over.




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Thanks folks great info here. Mrs. CP has never driven with anything being towed and I have limited experience. I have really been watching the highways for what people are towing and with what it's being towed. I would say 95% of what I have seen are full size trucks and SUVs as tow vehicles. That says something to me. And coaltrain's comment about towing something so much bigger than the tow vehicle is a thought that has gone through my head. We aren't looking to buy the Hilton on wheels. But the thought of even a small camper behind that Santa Fe makes me shake my head. It will be definitely taller than the roofline of the Santa Fe. What's even worse is that I don't get a lot of vacation and if the winter is bad, I may use up my vacation then. I came out of this winter with 1.5 days of vacation to use the rest of this calendar year. So Mrs. CP thought she might do some traveling with the boys on her own. That makes me very nervous. But even with a truck or Tahoe, I will probably still be very worried. Ok, maybe I won't let her read this thread!
IME, trailer height has never really been an issue (other than it killing gas mileage).

Back in the day, it used to be that smaller tow vehicles dragged pop-up tent trailers. My dad did that for years with his old AMC station wagons and you still see it quite a bit. Trailers have however, continued to get longer, taller and heavier. It's kind of amazing what is currently available.
 
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I think you've largely got it covered in this thread, but my general thoughts on all of it are:

- Towing is towing. It doesn't matter what the tow vehicle or the item being dragged.
- A 5000 lb rating is the ability to tow UP TO 5000 lbs when properly loaded and configured.
- Tongue weight counts toward your cargo weight. If you move something heavy from the back of the vehicle to the trailer, you increase the amount being towed and decrease the amount being carried by a portion.
- Passengers count toward cargo weight.
- A WDH is almost certainly going to be necessary in your particular configuration, anti-sway is likely to be useful as well.
- Lighter is better. When you're considering taking on the task of towing, look for the lowest profile and lightest weight you can get without sacrificing build quality and strength. Not only does it help you stay within the tow limits of the vehicle (don't forget to include the cargo that will go in that trailer), but it will keep the gas mileage in a little better position.
- Brake controllers work better than surge brakes. It's a $150 add-on to put a brake controlled into your vehicle (assuming you're already set up with a 7-pin harness). It's worth it to use the electric brake model trailers over the surge brake model trailers.
- Slow down. Towing takes a LOT more distance to stop, even with a trailer that has its own brakes. Take your time and allow more travel time to get to your destination and back home again.
- Be mindful of the stress you're putting on the tow vehicle. Especially if you're towing near or at capacity, you may not have an external transmission cooler or secondary oil cooler to keep the engine bay temps down. Towing through the hills can really work a tow vehicle that isn't equipped with this sort of stuff. Once again, take your time and don't overwork the vehicle.
 

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Another thing to consider is wear and tear on the vehicle.

Towing and hauling increases wear on the engine and transmission as well as the brakes and tires.

The closer you are to "max" capacity, the closer you are to "max" wear.

Engine & transmission service are required more for tow vehicles, every 3,000 miles verse every 5,000 miles (as an example).

Tires on an infrequently used trailer don't last much longer. Time, and sunlight if they aren't covered, kills them faster than if they were on the road.


Depending on what conveniences you want in a camper, there are several light "tents on wheels" that would probably fall within a reasonable weight range that your XSUV can handle.
We were considering one to tow behind our Jeep. It (the Jeep) only had a 2K capacity. The cost to use comparison lead us to the conclusion that a good 5x8 utility trailer to carry the camping stuff was the best solution.

Good luck in your search. You are on the right track with your thinking/approach.
 

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Just picked up a 2016 Explorer (rated to 6K) and I've towed my 3500-4K boat/trailer around with ease.

The other thing to consider is wheelbase. A longer wheelbase vehicle will tow in more stable a manner than a short one.

The new F-150 with the 2.7L Ecoboost is rated to 7,000 lbs and gets an average 21mpg combined (a couple guys here at work have them - very impressed), it drops to around 14 when towing.
 
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As said make sure your vehicle is properly configured for that tow rating.

We have a Dodge Durango Hemi for pulling our trailer 6000# RV. The Durango is rated at 8800# IF you have the optional 3.93 gear ratio in the axle. With the standard 3.55s its only 7500#. The change in axle ratio make a big difference in towing. The lower ratio makes it feel like you have an extra 30-50HP.

I find for most vehicles these days 2/3rds of the manufacturers rated weight is a comfortable towing weight.
 
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Adding to what clayh said - tow vehicle tire ratings. I have an F-150 with the max tow package but it has "P" rated tires. No way I would pull a heavy trailer without "LT" tires with a proper rating.

In terms of a CUV I think you would be limited to "P" rated tires which will allow sway. The sidewalls are less stiff to make for a better ride but not intended to hold well when any sway is involved.

I've just seen too much in my years on the road I guess - like countless times that I am afraid to attempt to pass a camper trailer being pulled by a less than worthy vehicle going slow - then holding my breath as I do pass hoping that the guy can hold his unit in his lane.
 

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"P" rating on a tire is a designator as to how much heat the tire can handle without breaking down. This is tied directly to the speed rating as holding a vehicle at speed for a duration of time will create a specific amount of heat.

-Generally- you can correlate the stiffness of the sidewall to the speed rating, but it isn't a direct relationship as the actual Load Index of the tire can and will vary although the speed ratings can be the same. In my experience, sway is caused and exacerbated more by improper weight distribution on the trailer (tongue too light) than any other factor. And a slight squeeze on the brake controller while SLOWING DOWN (foot off of the accelerator) will almost always bring everything back in line nicely.
 

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"P" rating on a tire is a designator as to how much heat the tire can handle without breaking down. This is tied directly to the speed rating as holding a vehicle at speed for a duration of time will create a specific amount of heat.

-Generally- you can correlate the stiffness of the sidewall to the speed rating, but it isn't a direct relationship as the actual Load Index of the tire can and will vary although the speed ratings can be the same. In my experience, sway is caused and exacerbated more by improper weight distribution on the trailer (tongue too light) than any other factor. And a slight squeeze on the brake controller while SLOWING DOWN (foot off of the accelerator) will almost always bring everything back in line nicely.
Are you sure about the "P" rating?
 

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"P" = "P-metric" which was developed for passenger cars.

That is one alternative in additions to:

"ST" = Special Trailer
"T" = Temp
"LT" = Light Truck
 

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Yeah - I guess I should have been more specific. When I said "P" I was talking about what JimR posted. I realize there are speed ratings that also use an alphabetical index.

So when I said "P" i was talking about passenger rated metric tires which as far as I know have no weight rating. In my feeble knowledge the passenger tires will have a weaker side wall to make for a cushy ride. When I talk about "LT" tire that indicates light truck which will have a weight rating (load class). Being my truck came with "P" tires I replaced them with "LT" tires with a load range "E" which is more suitable to towing a heavier trailer in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The new F-150 with the 2.7L Ecoboost is rated to 7,000 lbs and gets an average 21mpg combined (a couple guys here at work have them - very impressed), it drops to around 14 when towing.
I have had my eye on one of these:lol:. I think if you change the gear ratio in the rear axle I think it can bump up the 8,000lbs or so.


Also, thanks for the discussion of the tires everyone, hadn't thought anything about that:thumbup1gif:
 

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Yeah - I guess I should have been more specific. When I said "P" I was talking about what JimR posted. I realize there are speed ratings that also use an alphabetical index.

So when I said "P" i was talking about passenger rated metric tires which as far as I know have no weight rating. In my feeble knowledge the passenger tires will have a weaker side wall to make for a cushy ride. When I talk about "LT" tire that indicates light truck which will have a weight rating (load class). Being my truck came with "P" tires I replaced them with "LT" tires with a load range "E" which is more suitable to towing a heavier trailer in my opinion.
The "P" in "P265..." seems to really only be used to designate that the numbers you are about to read are metric....

There is absolutely a "P" speed rating (94MPH), which is what I thought you were actually referring to since you were discussing sidewall stiffness.
 
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