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Most of these older implements use 2x8, 10, or 12 “tie rod” cylinders that can be bought for under $100, plus maybe $50 for two hoses and couplers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok. They said I could take it for $800. But it still needs to be looked at. I'm going to be needing it here shortly. I'm a little late to the party. Haha.
 

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Standard hydraulic transport cylinders used on field cultivators are 4" x 8". The price with vary by manufacturer.

As for the hose lengths:
1st hose, measure from the farthest cylinder attaching eye, to the tip of the hitch. Then add 4'.
2nd hose, subtract 8" from the total length of the above measurement.
 

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Ok. They said I could take it for $800. But it still needs to be looked at. I'm going to be needing it here shortly. I'm a little late to the party. Haha.
I would think you would be able to find a cylinder at Grainger or possibly Surplus Center.com. Good luck with the purchase.
 

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I would think you would be able to find a cylinder at Grainger or possibly Surplus Center.com. Good luck with the purchase.

TSC or any other farm stores sell them too.
 

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The cylinder we had for that type application was enormous,, like 4 inch bore.

It was large, not for the power, but, rather for the volume, it took longer to fill.
The large volume allowed you to have fine control over positioning,,
seldom did you move the cylinder to the end of the travel.

Also, larger tractors have high volume hydraulic flows,,
put a 2" bore cylinder on the tractor, the rod will fly line a missile, and may break something,,,
 

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4"

The cylinder we had for that type application was enormous,, like 4 inch bore.

It was large, not for the power, but, rather for the volume, it took longer to fill.
The large volume allowed you to have fine control over positioning,,
seldom did you move the cylinder to the end of the travel.

Also, larger tractors have high volume hydraulic flows,,
put a 2" bore cylinder on the tractor, the rod will fly line a missile, and may break something,,,
We used 4" cylinders on most of the equipment. The length might vary but all were at least 8" stroke which usually worked well on disks, plows etc. A couple of places needed a longer stroke but nothing over a 4 x 12 that I can recall except for a log splitter.

Treefarmer
 

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As previously stated normal cyl stroke length for farm implements is 8''. I think a 2'' dia is too small,a 3'' will lift the cultivator but a 4'' will be better. Lower tractor hyd pressures will require larger diameter cylinder to raise this plow successfully.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Stopped at TSC today and a 3.5x8 is $150 and a 4x8 is $180. I also looked at the implement and it was in good shape. The woman asked what I thought and I told her what a cylinder cost and I got it for $700. Just have to get the cylinder and figure out what size ends their tractor takes. My 5200 is set for 1/2" pioneer. They have a small Ford and some other tractor. Hopefully I can just get them to lift the cylinder so I can block it up and pull it home with my truck.
 

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Hopefully I can just get them to lift the cylinder so I can block it up and pull it home with my truck.
I would lift it with a hydraulic floor jack, then install a solid steel bar with two holes, for transport,,
Can you imagine what would happen if a hose blew, or the inexpensive cylinder let the tool to drop?? :flag_of_truce:

There is a ratcheting devise specifically for this,,, if you were closer, you could borrow mine,,,

 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I see. I apologize for my ignorance but how would a floor jack get the shanks off the ground? Would the wheels move as you lift the frame of the implement up? I was thinking of putting steel blocks on the cylinder ram after opening it. Could that ratcheting turnbuckle deal pick the implement up if you put a pipe on the handle?
 

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Yes a ratchet jack similar to one in CADplans photo will raise the plow in question. How far apart are the cyl mounting pins in your photo?
 

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Transport

I see. I apologize for my ignorance but how would a floor jack get the shanks off the ground? Would the wheels move as you lift the frame of the implement up? I was thinking of putting steel blocks on the cylinder ram after opening it. Could that ratcheting turnbuckle deal pick the implement up if you put a pipe on the handle?
The straps behind where the top end of the cylinder connects appear to be transport straps. There should be a hole to slide a pin through in the rusty area. That also looks like it might take longer than an 8" stroke unless the bottom end of the cylinder mount is adjustable.

If the PO has a tractor to lift it with their cylinder, install the cylinder, lift it and put the transport strap in place. Collapse the cylinder- the bottom in is on a pivot so you can put all the weight on the transport straps and unhook the cylinder. Assuming tires, rims, hitch etc. are good you can take it home.

The turnbuckles can pick up most implements. It's slow and takes a bit of work but the mechanical advantage of the threads lets you apply a lot of lifting force.

Before you buy a cylinder, measure the distance/stroke needed. I couldn't tell if the bottom mounting was adjustable but the picture sure looked like it needed a longer stroke cylinder.


Treefarmer
 

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That also looks like it might take longer than an 8" stroke unless the bottom end of the cylinder mount is adjustable.
{...}
Before you buy a cylinder, measure the distance/stroke needed. I couldn't tell if the bottom mounting was adjustable but the picture sure looked like it needed a longer stroke cylinder.
Totally not an expert here, but I thought the original poster said he measured the length between the holes as 18". Given that an 8" stroke cylinder has to be at least 10" long when retracted, then this seems dead on?

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I am looking to see if anyone I know has a ratchet jack like that that I could borrow just to bring it home with. It may just be easier to mess with a hydraulic cylinder in my own shop and not in the current owners yard.
 

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Mine was originally an angle devise on my rake,,,



it was slow, I replaced it with this,,



I had one on a trailer type bush hog, as I never had the cylinder, the ratchet would easily adjust the cut height.
 

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