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Discussion Starter #4
:laugh: Thanks for being so worried about keeping this one on topic, Keith. Are you feeling ok? :lolol:

This is the cylinder I used btw: 1.5x6x0.75 HYFLOW CONTROLS DA HYDRAULIC CYLINDER

I hope to be headed up North this weekend and would like to get some progress on the hydraulics when I'm there.
 

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Jim Timber; I hate to be so dumb, but what or where are u mounting this item on ur tractor, and what does it do to help u?? I'm mentality stumped:think::munch::laugh: maybe a pic when u get it mounted-ok-thanks!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is the latching mechanism for my Skid Steer Quick Attach brackets on my loader. All these levers do (the top part is minimally stressed - even with 400# construction workers standing on them) is lift and lower the latching pins (those being high carbon wouldn't surprise me at all!) via spring loaded linkages.



But they made them out of 1.5" thick high strength steel that has a lovely ring to it when you ping it with a hammer - and I'm ok with that! :)

Once it's on the tractor and everything's back in it, I'll post pics of the plumbing and cylinder in place.
 

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thanks-now u won't have to get off the seat to swap attachments--how thumping nice is that-way to go their Jim Timber!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'll have to get off to hook/unhook the grapple hydraulics, but I won't ever scratch my knuckles on the hose protector zip ties ever again. :yahoo:

Since these are all pretty much standardized on how they're made, the cylinder was a direct fit and I just needed to find a way to integrate it where it was out of harms way and didn't affect the levers (or I would've had to make new ones). When I first bought the machine, I though they should've put tabs where I did and thought maybe I could make something work in there. When I saw these cylinders were $50, I measured the distances and discovered it was going to be a good fit and decided to get one and make it part of my hydraulics improvements for the off-season.

I've got some re-doing on the two spool valve out back I use for my stump grinder, the tilt cylinder, the diverter to go between top and tilt, and I need to hard plumb all those into the PBY loop too. My intention is to get that all handled while the ground's too soggy to drive on.
 

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I'll have to get off to hook/unhook the grapple hydraulics, but I won't ever scratch my knuckles on the hose protector zip ties ever again. :yahoo:

Since these are all pretty much standardized on how they're made, the cylinder was a direct fit and I just needed to find a way to integrate it where it was out of harms way and didn't affect the levers (or I would've had to make new ones). When I first bought the machine, I though they should've put tabs where I did and thought maybe I could make something work in there. When I saw these cylinders were $50, I measured the distances and discovered it was going to be a good fit and decided to get one and make it part of my hydraulics improvements for the off-season.

I've got some re-doing on the two spool valve out back I use for my stump grinder, the tilt cylinder, the diverter to go between top and tilt, and I need to hard plumb all those into the PBY loop too. My intention is to get that all handled while the ground's too soggy to drive on.

yeah, I bet the water is really running at ur property-huh!!
 

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This is the latching mechanism for my Skid Steer Quick Attach brackets on my loader. All these levers do (the top part is minimally stressed - even with 400# construction workers standing on them) is lift and lower the latching pins (those being high carbon wouldn't surprise me at all!) via spring loaded linkages.



But they made them out of 1.5" thick high strength steel that has a lovely ring to it when you ping it with a hammer - and I'm ok with that! :)

Once it's on the tractor and everything's back in it, I'll post pics of the plumbing and cylinder in place.

Those look just like the SSQA adapters on my H180 loader for my 4066R. Being able to use skid loader attachments increases my versatility tremendously.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's hard to say. We didn't have all that much snow this year, so unless we get a wet spring it could dry out pretty quick.

This is typical of snow melt up there.



The rest of the year it's dry unless we have a huge rain event(s).

My two mucky areas are spring fed, so they're wet regardless. I have 3 acres of wooded swamp (where my road crosses), and about 1/8 acre of a seep that's in a little draw on the side of a ridge. The seep just flows enough to keep the ground wet.
 

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Did you pre heat in case it was above medium carbon or did you figure it was high strength, low alloy grade 70 or similar?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I had cracks in the weld as soon as it was completed on a couple sides (one of my tacks cracked). Ended up running slow to give the area a good heat soak to compensate for it and get them to stop. Not pulled off at the root, but right down the middle like welding big cold parts tends to do.

This stuff welded beautifully otherwise.

I was able to hammer-tune the angle after tacking on both parts without any issues. I don't think these will ever fail with the amount of solid weld I have in them.
 

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Huh, wonder what they used then. Usually it takes some midrange Rockwell c numbers to generate some tone. Maybe 4140ht. I have a production project to estimate that our customer wants 4140 B7 welded. From what I read I have been advised to weld the assembly with the 4140 in annealed condition and pre heat to 5-600 degrees, weld and slow cool then harden and quench and temper the assembly. They state if I try welding in the hardened state that even with this pre heating that cracking is still quite possible. Not looking forward to this little project...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I was chasing cracks with 309L and er70s2. Good solid weld on one side, and POP on the other as soon as the clamp was removed. Clamp it down again, weld it, remove clamp - POP. Grrrr... Mind you, I'm trying to tack this so I can check fits and movement. I don't want it all that solidly attached.

Ended up getting it to behave, got the other one tacked, more cracking... Then went through and got a nice bead on one side and a crack on the other (thinking "since when does a 1/2" need a gap for a lightly beveled fillet?" ). Ran over it a couple more times and the crack is gone. Do another pass - good. Do another - crack. Do a couple more slow passes to get the crack worked out - good. Cap weld - ah, finally... We're good.

This is not fun. But there was no crud coming out of the weld. No glass from contaminants. Stuff would make a nice puddle, nice bead, just bit you in the butt if the base wasn't quite hot enough with any tension in it.


I built up the non-relief side (one side of the tab has clearance for the clevis up against the inside of the bracket and needs a relieved corner), then built up the ends really good - no signs of cracking after the tack issues - good.

I didn't post all this earlier because I was tired and in all, it's just what you deal with when doing this work. These parts are very much HARD. They ride on what's probably a grade 5 pin without grease. The little "leg" I added the tabs to is designed to lock the latches in the down position. Those latch pieces are probably some high grade steel given their application. I still don't know why they'd make these so stout and then go alloy on top of that. I get that they have foot steps cast into them, but 1/2x1.75" 1018 is going to hold up 3 people too. Everyone else in the tractor industry makes cheesy stamped levers that guys end up bending on twigs. :unknown:


4140 pre-hard is a who ore. Go annealed for the sake of your tooling if not the sanity of your weldors. Heat treat afterwards will probably run about $100-130 per hundred lbs. Before I knew how affordable heat treat was, I was always afraid of it. "Torch and a bucket of oil." Now that I do my products through SBN before they're ready for sale - it's a non-issue. Pay the man and be happy knowing it's done right.
 

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Go annealed for the sake of your tooling if not the sanity of your weldors. Heat treat afterwards will probably run about $100-130 per hundred lbs. Before I knew how affordable heat treat was, I was always afraid of it. "Torch and a bucket of oil." Now that I do my products through SBN before they're ready for sale - it's a non-issue. Pay the man and be happy knowing it's done right.
Annealing is one (of many subjects :lol:) I can't wrap my mind around, that is a freaking science with a lot of critical temps
and timing involved to do it right.
Was reading an article a while back that chilling a piece of iron in salt water will cool it a lot quicker and more uniform than regular
water, who knew?:lol:
 

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Annealing is one (of many subjects :lol:) I can't wrap my mind around, that is a freaking science with a lot of critical temps
and timing involved to do it right.
Was reading an article a while back that chilling a piece of iron in salt water will cool it a lot quicker and more uniform than regular
water, who knew?:lol:
Heat treating is a subject I find fascinating and I have run some large batch style furnaces in my time that could digest several thousand lbs of steel in the vestibule. There are many good books on the steps necessary for hardening, tempering and annealing steels and the bugs have been worked out long ago. Water is used as a quenching agent for some steels but is is usually a heavy brine or a mix of water and a polymer. Water should only be used on a few applications, it will cool the part too quickly and crack it. Oil heated to 150F is the most common quench agent. I have done hundreds of harden and temper operations on tooling that I created in the facility I work for now and I have a neat reference manual that I rely on and if anyone is interested I could get the title and author and post it here. It gives the beginner an excellent understanding of a variety of processes.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I added some cylinder protection to the back, and may still add some to the front before all is done.

I don't have the end pins made yet. I'll need to make some bracketry for the second diverter too, so it's got some more work before she'll be ready to use.

20160311_163642.jpg
 

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Annealing is one (of many subjects :lol:) I can't wrap my mind around, that is a freaking science with a lot of critical temps
and timing involved to do it right.
Was reading an article a while back that chilling a piece of iron in salt water will cool it a lot quicker and more uniform than regular
water, who knew?:lol:

Also works great for beer !! :bigbeer:
 
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