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Same here. My 2010 was a row crop tractor and had a wide front.
That sure makes things confusing. By definition row crop is a tricycle wheel design to better manage driving through "rows" of crops. You only had to change the rear wheel spacing to match the width of the rows.

I see the 1010 series had a wide front end and was called a utility tractor, the 2010 series had a wide front end and was called a row-crop, the 3010 series had tricycle wheels and was called row-crop, and then the 4010 series was back to a wide front end and called row-crop. :banghead:

A "row crop" tractor with a wide front end is sort of like a 4-wheeled tricycle. :)
 

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Now I understand

That sure makes things confusing. By definition row crop is a tricycle wheel design to better manage driving through "rows" of crops. You only had to change the rear wheel spacing to match the width of the rows.

I see the 1010 series had a wide front end and was called a utility tractor, the 2010 series had a wide front end and was called a row-crop, the 3010 series had tricycle wheels and was called row-crop, and then the 4010 series was back to a wide front end and called row-crop. :banghead:

A "row crop" tractor with a wide front end is sort of like a 4-wheeled tricycle. :)
Interesting. I usually think tricycle or wide front. I think I've seen some wide front tractors with "Row Crop Special" on the side.

Treefarmer
 

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Interesting. I usually think tricycle or wide front. I think I've seen some wide front tractors with "Row Crop Special" on the side.

Treefarmer
Could they have been "High Crop"?
 

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If row crop doesn't necessarily mean tricycle wheels, can someone with more experience with the older tractors tell us what in fact makes a tractor a row crop tractor?
 

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If row crop doesn't necessarily mean tricycle wheels, can someone with more experience with the older tractors tell us what in fact makes a tractor a row crop tractor?
Was thinking about this. Now I have zero experience farming, so....

I remember on my 2010 the front axle was adjustable. You had bolts you could loosen and adjust each wheel in or out by sliding the axle pieces.

So maybe it is considered a row crop of the wheels are adjustable to suit different row widths?

Edit to add: found this as a definition of row crop -

A tractor is usually considered a "row crop" when the tread spacings (wheel widths) can be adjusted, whether they are tricycle type,single or adjustable wide axle front wheels.
And a pic showing the front axle and rear wheels being adjustable.

7EFA6235-78CD-49AC-AD92-FFE5E71D53DB.jpeg
 

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Was thinking about this. Now I have zero experience farming, so....

I remember on my 2010 the front axle was adjustable. You had bolts you could loosen and adjust each wheel in or out by sliding the axle pieces.

So maybe it is considered a row crop of the wheels are adjustable to suit different row widths?

Edit to add: found this as a definition of row crop -



And a pic showing the front axle and rear wheels being adjustable.

View attachment 491482
Interesting. Then by that definition the old Ford 9N/8N was a row crop since it had adjustable wheel spacing front and rear. Although I've never heard of those tractors referred to as row-crop. I seem to recall the Ford 940 being the first Ford tractor referred to as a row crop.

Sorry - I know we've taken this thread a bit off topic.
 

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Row crop tractors

Interesting. Then by that definition the old Ford 9N/8N was a row crop since it had adjustable wheel spacing front and rear. Although I've never heard of those tractors referred to as row-crop. I seem to recall the Ford 940 being the first Ford tractor referred to as a row crop.

Sorry - I know we've taken this thread a bit off topic.
I don't know the definition but I suspect it's a tractor with 2 point hitch, remotes and enough power to pull implements used in crop production. When I was a kid, that might have been a 35 hp tractor. Now, it's quite a bit more. See:

https://www.deere.com/en/tractors/row-crop-tractors/

Yesterday's Tractor has this definition:
Definition of Row crop - Yesterday's Tractors

There seems to be a lot of confusion over the definition.

Treefarmer
 

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Was thinking about this. Now I have zero experience farming, so....

I remember on my 2010 the front axle was adjustable. You had bolts you could loosen and adjust each wheel in or out by sliding the axle pieces.

So maybe it is considered a row crop of the wheels are adjustable to suit different row widths?

Edit to add: found this as a definition of row crop -



And a pic showing the front axle and rear wheels being adjustable.

View attachment 491482

You may not have farming experience and I am not old, maybe, but you hit it on the head. Narrow front or wide front does not matter. What matters is that the wheels front and rear can be spaced or adjusted to different row widths. It really does not make much of a difference on how much crop is run over during cultivating. As an old neighbor told me years ago, there is a lot of rows.
 

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My 67 1020RU is considered a row crop. Look up model number and after the "RU" suffix they always say row crop. Both the swept back wide front and the rear wheels are adjustable with the original rear wheels are power adjustable. The power adjustable means you loosen the wedges on both wheels and drive the tractor either forward or backward to move them in or out. Other adjustable rear wheel types you have to turn the wheel or rims around to adjust the width.
 

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My 67 1020RU is considered a row crop. Look up model number and after the "RU" suffix they always say row crop. Both the swept back wide front and the rear wheels are adjustable with the original rear wheels are power adjustable. The power adjustable means you loosen the wedges on both wheels and drive the tractor either forward or backward to move them in or out. Other adjustable rear wheel types you have to turn the wheel or rims around to adjust the width.
In their day the "RU" tractors were advertised as "Rowcrop Utility"!

"Utility" being a lower to the ground tractor than the normal "row crop" tractors.
 

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My 67 1020RU is considered a row crop. Look up model number and after the "RU" suffix they always say row crop. Both the swept back wide front and the rear wheels are adjustable with the original rear wheels are power adjustable. The power adjustable means you loosen the wedges on both wheels and drive the tractor either forward or backward to move them in or out. Other adjustable rear wheel types you have to turn the wheel or rims around to adjust the width.
drifterbike---don't forget about the ones that can be slid on the axle. my jd model 50 is slid on the axle-loosen up some bolts and then u can adjust to what ever width u wanted-worked for plowing-cultivating, etc. on the back of my seat box was a chart that showed u where to set ur wheels at for certain things. i never moved mine as it had the loader on-and i never got to plow with it any, in the fields.
i did get to plow with our old 38 jd B-and for that-my pap just slid the drawbar to the far side-and made it stay there by inserting a bolt back into the frame of the drawbar. both my paps had what was called a hillside hitch on their drawbars. u could adjust it by just reaching around to the handle and squeezing the handle it unlocked the drawbar to let u slide it from side to side-used this on a hill plowing. something i don't own-but do know where one had been at.
 

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Big Jim, glad to hear from you! I read your post yesterday but forgot to say something then. Batter late than never.:good2:
 

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Big Jim, glad to hear from you! I read your post yesterday but forgot to say something then. Batter late than never.:good2:
:bigthumb: thanks-yes-my brain is doing a lot better. but-oh-man-something squishy comes on tv-i can do this easy:cray::cry: i try to stay away from that watching. wife is happier with me too-so thanks.:good2:
 

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Sliding wheels

drifterbike---don't forget about the ones that can be slid on the axle. my jd model 50 is slid on the axle-loosen up some bolts and then u can adjust to what ever width u wanted-worked for plowing-cultivating, etc. on the back of my seat box was a chart that showed u where to set ur wheels at for certain things. i never moved mine as it had the loader on-and i never got to plow with it any, in the fields.
i did get to plow with our old 38 jd B-and for that-my pap just slid the drawbar to the far side-and made it stay there by inserting a bolt back into the frame of the drawbar. both my paps had what was called a hillside hitch on their drawbars. u could adjust it by just reaching around to the handle and squeezing the handle it unlocked the drawbar to let u slide it from side to side-used this on a hill plowing. something i don't own-but do know where one had been at.
I seem to remember sliding the wheels on an Oliver 1600 or 1650 once. It sounds easy but with a cast iron center wheel and the tires loaded there was a lot of weight to slide plus of course you had to jack up the tractor first. I've forgotten exactly why they needed to be moved, probably to match a plow but it wasn't something to look forward to.

The Allis Chalmers WD-45 had spin out wheels. Take the chocks out and put it in gear. Lock the brake on the other side and it would slide the wheel out. That worked pretty well but the rear end was a lot lighter than the Olivers.

Treefarmer
 

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My 60 is probably a lot like Jim’s 50. Loosen a couple of wheel wedge bolts on the axle, then using a socket, turn the pinion that moves the wheel in or out depending on which way you turn it. It’s much easier if you jack that side up first. The wedges can also be a PIA if they were over-tightened or seized.
 

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Was thinking about this. Now I have zero experience farming, so....

I remember on my 2010 the front axle was adjustable. You had bolts you could loosen and adjust each wheel in or out by sliding the axle pieces.

So maybe it is considered a row crop of the wheels are adjustable to suit different row widths?

Edit to add: found this as a definition of row crop -



And a pic showing the front axle and rear wheels being adjustable.

View attachment 491482
You got it. Either a narrow front or an adjustable front, and adjustable rear wheel spacing made it a "row crop" tractor.
Generally they also had a slightly higher stance than a "utility" tractor and were fitted with narrower tires/wheels as well.
 

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My 60 is probably a lot like Jim’s 50. Loosen a couple of wheel wedge bolts on the axle, then using a socket, turn the pinion that moves the wheel in or out depending on which way you turn it. It’s much easier if you jack that side up first. The wedges can also be a PIA if they were over-tightened or seized.


when i put new tires on my jd model 50-- yrs ago. i wanted to make sure they was able to slide in or out. what a hr job should of been-turned into a 2 day nightmare. no rim or tire on-and it took 2 of us beating on the hub-while using the torch to heat things up. that one broke loose that evening finally-ran it out past where i had sat for however many yrs-and never seized everything. ran the hub back and forth so the never seize would coat good.

the right side--we gave up after the next evening it just would not budge. just walk around a tractor show-and talk to the old timers-lots of horror stories to be heard about getting them to slide in and out-if not moved yrly.
 

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[/B]
when i put new tires on my jd model 50-- yrs ago. i wanted to make sure they was able to slide in or out. what a hr job should of been-turned into a 2 day nightmare. no rim or tire on-and it took 2 of us beating on the hub-while using the torch to heat things up. that one broke loose that evening finally-ran it out past where i had sat for however many yrs-and never seized everything. ran the hub back and forth so the never seize would coat good.

the right side--we gave up after the next evening it just would not budge. just walk around a tractor show-and talk to the old timers-lots of horror stories to be heard about getting them to slide in and out-if not moved yrly.
We had the same on a 4630. Had been set for row crops and wanted to spread it for haying, after a day of beating on it and swearing and a can of WD-40, we ended up just leaving it as is.
 
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