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Would anyone be able to tell me if I could use a Dewalt cordless miter saw to cut tile for a shower remodel if I have the right blade?
 

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Would anyone be able to tell me if I could use a Dewalt cordless miter saw to cut tile for a shower remodel if I have the right blade?
Sure you can, but it will make lots & lots of dust. Tile dust is very abrasive & not good for the saw, the area you will be cutting in or the person doing the cutting.
A wet saw is a lot better.
 

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Sure you can, but it will make lots & lots of dust. Tile dust is very abrasive & not good for the saw, the area you will be cutting in or the person doing the cutting.
A wet saw is a lot better.
In other words you wouldn't recommend it?
 

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Thanks guys, I wouldn't want to ruin a perfectly good tool! Or the mitre saw! :laugh:
 

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How many pieces do you have to cut? Do you need a tile break instead? You should be able to break a piece off as small as an inch.

You could make a poor man's wet saw with a cheap grinder. Just add a piece of small diameter hose and use an ice cream pail with a valve to control the water flow. Dewalt used to make a small wet saw like that. I cut a few thousand tile with the little Dewalt tile saw.
 

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Can it do it? Yes. Would I recommend it? No. I just sanded dry wall with my Shop-Vac with the Xtra-Protective bagging and filters. The dust ate the motor in nothing flat. :banghead:
 

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Can it do it? Yes. Would I recommend it? No. I just sanded dry wall with my Shop-Vac with the Xtra-Protective bagging and filters. The dust ate the motor in nothing flat. :banghead:
:lol::lol:
I killed a perfectly good vacuum the same way. :banghead:
 

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How many pieces do you have to cut? Do you need a tile break instead? You should be able to break a piece off as small as an inch.

You could make a poor man's wet saw with a cheap grinder. Just add a piece of small diameter hose and use an ice cream pail with a valve to control the water flow. Dewalt used to make a small wet saw like that. I cut a few thousand tile with the little Dewalt tile saw.
I'm taking out a tub and enclosure and putting in a tile shower with glass door. Are you talking side grinder like I use to clean up my welds with? I have a Dewalt sidegrinder but I wouldn't want to ruin it either. And I've eaten more than my share of ice cream but I don't know what an ice cream pail is. I'll have to look into the Dewalt wet saw.
 

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Can it do it? Yes. Would I recommend it? No. I just sanded dry wall with my Shop-Vac with the Xtra-Protective bagging and filters. The dust ate the motor in nothing flat. :banghead:
Glad you mentioned this I wouldn't want to ruin my new shop vac I just bought.
 

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Can it do it? Yes. Would I recommend it? No. I just sanded dry wall with my Shop-Vac with the Xtra-Protective bagging and filters. The dust ate the motor in nothing flat. :banghead:
I forgot who makes it but there's a bucket attachment for this; one five gallon bucket of water and a lid that accepts an in and out hose. One hose goes to the sander and one hose goes to the vac. The dust is pulled though the inlet and into the bucket of water where it is trapped. Your vac is saved. I have used this many times as I have one but to be honest, that is one job worth hiring out....

Now, back to the original OP question; I have that saw and I would vote no as well. You can rent a wet saw for not much at any DIY or hardware rental and I would go that route. As everyone else has said, too much dust going into an expensive saw. Just like the drywall.
 

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I would have to agree with the others that said not to do it. I bought a small wet saw with sliding table several years ago from Home Depot for less than $150 and it works great for small jobs. IIRC, it will not cut tile larger than 12 x 12.
 

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Don't do it. Besides for the numerous reasons already listed, you will not get good, quality, detailed cuts. With a wet saw, and the proper diamond blade, you will get smooth cuts, little to no chips, and you can plunge cut, lift the tile into the blade to clean corners, etc. You can also do long cuts, because of the travel of the tray. You can't do that with a miter saw. It would be like trying to run wood trim using a chainsaw- it isn't about whether it would work or not, but rather is it the best tool? Absolutely not. You are doing some very expensive, very permanent, aesthetic work- use the right saw. Rent one, buy new or used. But, to use something else, besides a quality wet saw with either a sliding tray or a bridge, will greatly compromise the quality of your finished job.
I built walk in showers for over 30 years. I know the difference between making an improper tool work, and using what's best.
It will cost less to use the right tool.
 

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Don't do it. Besides for the numerous reasons already listed, you will not get good, quality, detailed cuts. With a wet saw, and the proper diamond blade, you will get smooth cuts, little to no chips, and you can plunge cut, lift the tile into the blade to clean corners, etc. You can also do long cuts, because of the travel of the tray. You can't do that with a miter saw. It would be like trying to run wood trim using a chainsaw- it isn't about whether it would work or not, but rather is it the best tool? Absolutely not. You are doing some very expensive, very permanent, aesthetic work- use the right saw. Rent one, buy new or used. But, to use something else, besides a quality wet saw with either a sliding tray or a bridge, will greatly compromise the quality of your finished job.
I built walk in showers for over 30 years. I know the difference between making an improper tool work, and using what's best.
It will cost less to use the right tool.
Yep. I was looking at them online. I can get one for around $150. So I think I'll go that route.
 

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You may be able to rent one.
I will be doing some landscaping with pavers and the one I saw on line will cut those also. Is that correct or are they just blowing smoke up my pant leg?
 

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I will be doing some landscaping with pavers and the one I saw on line will cut those also. Is that correct or are they just blowing smoke up my pant leg?
While it will cut both, you may not want to do that. There are different diamond blades, and some brick/block machines use an abrasive blade, with no water. For a wet saw that would cut brick, the diamond blade may not be for fine cutting. It works well for brick, but it will not give a smoother, chip-free cut on tile. There are even diamond blades for cutting glass- a regular tile blade will not cut glass tile without chipping. So, it will be important, for the finish quality of your job, that the wet saw is suitable for tile. A tile blade will also cut brick, but a brick blade may not cut tile nicely.
 
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