Green Tractor Talk banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a 2032r in late November, and I'm starting to kick myself. Here's the story:

I had a used 2010 2305 with 700+ hours on it and used it mostly for mowing with some really light loader work. I have to be honest, I thought it was woefully inadequate for what I wanted to do, but I just avoided those projects. I loaned it out to my dad, and my step brother fried up the 4wd. Fun.... Needless to say, I was pretty upset given I had a perfectly fine working tractor and now had nothing to clear snow with or mow my yard with.

After much consideration, my dad agreed to chip in on the down payment for a new tractor, since my 2305 was going to cost more to fix than it was worth (still planning to sell as is, or part out). With that in mind, the local dealer had a 2032r which i thought would be perfect. I could still mow fairly adequately, and loader work would be much better and more stable (all true).

However, we have 15 acres, mostly wooded, and have been throwing around the idea of clearing some trees or purchasing another 5-6 acres so that we can have pasture land and have horses and hopefully a couple beef cows. I know that my 2032r can't move round bales, and square bales would be no problem but they sound limited in access and more expensive.

Should I have tried to find a used 5 series and a z turn? 0% financing and a tractor that I thought could do just about everything I wanted was so hard to turn down, maybe hindsight is 20/20..

So let's hear it. Can i still use my 2032r for horses if we decide to get them? My wife has horse fever right now, but would be irate if I told her my tractor with 14 hours on it won't do the job.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JKR and BigJim55

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Well... not trying to sound sarcastic or anything but keeping and caring for horses, including clearing pasture land, was accomplished by people without tractors at all in the past...

Only you can be the judge of the cost/time ratio.
MASSIVE (literally) difference between a 2 series and a 5 series...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,484 Posts
You never know until you try.

Aside from moving bales you are probably fine. I don't know anything about the round bales, everything we bailed was the traditional rectangular bale, but don't they come in a couple sizes? Any option of moving a smaller round bale with the 3 point? Maybe a trailer like they use to move big propane tanks but with hydraulics to lift the bale?

I wouldn't say anything to your wife about it. Especially about it being too small....:lol:

Put it to work. If it is too small of a tractor, she'll see it as well. Then it will be her idea to upgrade. :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,538 Posts
Yes. . .

Pretty much everyone buys too small of a tractor because you can always see something else you could do if only you had more power, traction, lift capacity etc. The real answer is whether you can afford an upgrade.

You might want to check with the dealer and see how bad a hit you could take by upgrading now. 14 hours is an extended try out but not really an issue on the machine. It's possible that you can walk into a sweet deal if Deere wants to sell the larger machines but can't keep yours in stock. No guarantees but you never know unless you ask.

I think your machine is not really adequate for land clearing, although it will work for that. It will be slower, move smaller chunks and you will have to be very careful about ground clearance or end up bashing in something important on the underside of the tractor. If you need to move logs and the bigger tractor isn't in the cards, you could buy a forwarding trailer or log arch. Hakmet - ATV Loader Trailer

ATV Log Arch A | Hud-Son

An option for moving big round bales of hay is a tumblebug: Product - Tumble Bug

I bought a used one and until the brakes locked up in snow, it worked surprisingly well. I need to fix the brakes but just haven't gotten round to it since we have larger tractors to move hay anyway. I also used the tumble bug to move firewood. I cut logs to length to fit across the tumble bug and stacked them up. When I got to my barn area, I could dump the whole cart in about 10 seconds and cut to firewood length there.

In short, more tractor is probably better but you also have other options if you keep what you have.

Treefarmer
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
46,312 Posts
IMO, if you go with a bigger tractor you should also have the BH attachment.
I also don't think getting a few horses is a good reason to have/need a bigger tractor unless you are planning to do your own hay. Having the land/duties is a good reason.
Note: Do you think you will need a bigger tractor once the land is cleared?

With all that, I would have had a bigger tractor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
At our last place, I kept 20 sheep, 25 chickens, 10 acres of pasture, 80 acres of woods, and 20 acres of hay field under control with a 66 year old model M and a model G. No loaders, no live pto, no 4x4, not even a cup holder! The folks who lived there before ww2 did all the same work without any tractor at all. There is a difference between needing something to make a job easier, and needing something because it is the only way to get a job done.

Small tractors can simply do things which big ones can't. A good example: My M can fit into so many tight places. It was great for working in the woods. Sure the G could have skidded twice as many logs in one go, but it was also huge by comparison and simply couldn't fit between trees once you got off the trail. It was also a lot more difficult to get un-stuck if it found soft ground.

If you are creative enough, small tractors can also do the same work as the big ones. The log arch and hay bale mover provided Treefarmer are great examples. I had several bizarre little gadgets like that which I built to compensate for my tractor's shortcomings. You don't need a loader to move rocks if you have a strong lever and a stone boat. I moved rocks that would give a 5Series a run for its money without the need for a loader, let alone a grapple bucket.

And then there is the cost. Big tractors come with big price tags. Not just to buy; they demand more fuel, more oil, more hydraulic fluid, larger filters, bigger tires, a bigger place to keep them, a bigger truck and trailer to move them, and sturdier attachments to hook to them. I always figured that my G cost me a minimum of double the operations cost of my M no matter how I looked at it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,746 Posts
WELL I just read my new FURROW magazine that came in the mail. I couldn't believe the price jd has listed for a 5045e-jeez!

for $19,697.00 suggested price with a 9x3 tranny. no loader for that, buy jimmy crickets, I thought that was a low price, even if had no cab. now isn't that even lower than the 2032r's going for. oh--yeah, and it has a up-and down stack too-haha!!:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the advice. It seems that as long as I can find/stomach the increased price of square bales, I'm ok with my current tractor?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,080 Posts
However, we have 15 acres, mostly wooded, and have been throwing around the idea of clearing some trees or purchasing another 5-6 acres so that we can have pasture land and have horses and hopefully a couple beef cows. I know that my 2032r can't move round bales, and square bales would be no problem but they sound limited in access and more expensive.

Before you start looking at other machines, find out what size round bales are actually available in your area. You say a 2032R can't move round bales but that isn't quite true. There is HUGE difference between doing the actual haying and trying to lift bales from the field and stack them 2-high on a trailer and moving an occasional bale that is on the ground to another spot on the ground.

Round bales typically come either 4' or 5' wide and either 4', 5' or 6' in diameter. A 4'x4' round bale should weigh right about 575 lbs and can be moved with a 2023R. If you use a 3pt bale spear it shouldn't be a problem to pick one up and drive it to where you need it. In theory, you should be able to handle all but the 6' diameter bales with your 3pt.

Now, you aren't going to be able to load or unload a truck that way but if you can get the bales delivered and dropped to the ground (or onto pallets) you can move them from there. I wouldn't want to waste my time trying to harvest or bale hay with my 2032R, but moving a bale once a week is easy enough to do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,207 Posts
Have you guys had horses before? If not, that might make a good thread on its own. Lots of folks here with a lot of info.

As for the tractor, I know a bunch of horse owners that just have a small one or don't have one at all.

You can feed round bales without a tractor at your place. Lay a strap or chain in the bed of your truck, have the seller load the bale from the side so it wants to roll out the tailgate. When you get home, pull your strap over the top of the bale and use a chain to hook both ends of the strap to a tree, big fence post, etc. Drive away and let the strap pull the bale out. Once you unhook it, you can pull the strap and bale strings off with it on the ground. It's not as convenient as carrying one out with the tractor and putting it down, but it does work. Square bales are also an option, and probably what most hobby horse owners do. It's what we did for years because even though we had a big enough tractor we didn't have storage space for big round bales. It's also easier to find "horse quality" square bales, a lot of round bales aren't as high quality because most folks are just feeding them to cows.

As others have said, the smaller tractor actually has an advantage. It will fit in whatever type shelter you have planned to clean it out better.

For years, the ranch out here only had an 855 John Deere tractor, but cared for 5-6 horses and 40+ cow/ calf pairs. Your tractor certainly can do whatever is needed for horses, it just may mean a little more work on your part feeding hay for a few months.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,207 Posts
Now, you aren't going to be able to load or unload a truck that way but if you can get the bales delivered and dropped to the ground (or onto pallets) you can move them from there. I wouldn't want to waste my time trying to harvest or bale hay with my 2032R, but moving a bale once a week is easy enough to do.
Before I had the 5320 out here, we were loading bales out the the field with a big Ford, and then unloading them with the JD 855 by using the bucket to roll them off the trailer. That might be an option for him also. I wouldn't count on getting bales delivered without a big tractor to pick them up off the trailer, but if he could haul their own then it could work. I don't know how well a 2 series could move much bigger than a 4x4 bale though. The weight is so far back on the hitch it has a lot of leverage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,919 Posts
While I certainly agree with most here that your rig will do the job, I lean towards the larger the better. I personally needed to upgrade from a 1 series to a 4 series due mostly for stability and horsepower. We have very hilly, uneven land here in East TN, and one pass in the pasture with my 1025R was enough for me to realize stability was going to be a problem. I nearly rolled the tractor over when the front wheel found a "gopher hole" hiding in the tall grass.

The 4105 fit my needs as it has really big tires set out wide. I had no need for a MMM, as we cut lawn grass with a zero turn. Loader capacity, PTO power, 3PH lift capacity, etc. we're all in line with what we needed. I also have a carport attached to the house that it fits under and most of my implements fit there too.

And the 4105 with loader and 6' brush hog cost just about $8K more than my 1025R which seemed reasonable to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Doesn't sound like this is your livelyhood, so if you're having small square bales done, me and Mr. 1025r have pulled around fully loaded hay wagons with 200 bales on them. Sometimes it's a little interesting to get that load moving. :) other related to the horse activities: is spreading manure, resurfacing the mud pasture with the box blade, and unloading pallets of bedding from the pickup. Horse bedding comes off in 12 bag increments using loader and pallet forks.

You can basically do it all. Sometimes it takes a little creativity. It always takes patience and seat time and that's where the cup holder comes in. :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
You can feed round bales without a tractor at your place. Lay a strap or chain in the bed of your truck, have the seller load the bale from the side so it wants to roll out the tailgate. When you get home, pull your strap over the top of the bale and use a chain to hook both ends of the strap to a tree, big fence post, etc. Drive away and let the strap pull the bale out. Once you unhook it, you can pull the strap and bale strings off with it on the ground. It's not as convenient as carrying one out with the tractor and putting it down, but it does work.
I'd suggest removing the tailgate from the truck before doing this. The new trucks don't have as beefy of a tailgate as the older trucks did and rolling a large load of the end of it is likely to buckle it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
you could get a new 5E for the sale price of that 2032R. if you can swing it, do it!:thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,155 Posts
However, we have 15 acres, mostly wooded, and have been throwing around the idea of clearing some trees or purchasing another 5-6 acres so that we can have pasture land and have horses and hopefully a couple beef cows. I know that my 2032r can't move round bales, and square bales would be no problem but they sound limited in access and more expensive.

Should I have tried to find a used 5 series and a z turn? 0% financing and a tractor that I thought could do just about everything I wanted was so hard to turn down, maybe hindsight is 20/20..

So let's hear it. Can i still use my 2032r for horses if we decide to get them? My wife has horse fever right now, but would be irate if I told her my tractor with 14 hours on it won't do the job.
I am trying to understand how a larger tractor would help with clearing trees. Even a 5 series won't push trees over - they need to be cut and skidded. I've taken down many trees, cut into 10'-15' lengths, and skidded them out with my 2520 with no problems. The stumps are another part of the equation - for me a one time operation like that would have me either rent or hire a larger track-hoe and just get it done.

And this - "if we decide to get horses".....that sounds like a pretty big "if". Does the tractor you presently have fulfill your needs? If so then use it and be happy. They make tractors every day so sometime down the road if you do get some large livestock then you can assess what size tractor you need then having a much better idea of what needs to be handled.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,207 Posts
I'd suggest removing the tailgate from the truck before doing this. The new trucks don't have as beefy of a tailgate as the older trucks did and rolling a large load of the end of it is likely to buckle it.
Good point. I sometimes forget about tailgates...:flag_of_truce:

Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Car Transport


My friend in TN moves all his hay this way, but he has an early 90's Dodge. That thing has more steel in the tailgate than some newer trucks have in the frame. :laugh:
 

·
Bonehead Club Lackey
Joined
·
11,653 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,080 Posts
Hmmm... They comment that the baler is "6 ft wide" and the bales are 5.5' in diameter but Massey says that baler produces bales that are 39" wide by 52" diameter. So they are essentially 4x4 small round bales.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gizmo2 and BigJim55

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,207 Posts
I'll agree with Jim, those are 4x4 bales. If you notice, the spear actually extends completely through the bale and in the shot at the end of the guy leaning on it, it's just about chest high. Bale weights can vary greatly depending on the baler used, type and condition of grass, and density of the bale. They claim the the video their bale weighs 500 lbs. That's in the ballpark for a 4x4 according to Georgia Forage, they say depending on density a bale that size can weigh 400-600 lbs.

The trouble will be finding anyone baling that size. I've never found anyone baling smaller than a 5x5 bale unless it was someone with a small tractor baling for their own use. For most people in the business of selling hay it's too much cost per bale when you can roll a bigger one for about the same cost and it takes fewer bales (less handling) to move the same amount of hay. Depending again on density, grass type, how well the baler is set up, etc a 5x5 can weigh 880-1180 lbs. I'd be surprised if a 2 series could move one, even on the three point. Add 100 lbs for the spear and best case scenario you've got almost 1,000 lbs on the hitch hanging 5' off the back of the tractor.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top