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I just got back from a quick store/post office run,,, IT IS COLD OUTSIDE!!

Most times,, I do not pass people on the road I travel,, but,
it seems when it is this cold (close to single digits!!), other people want to drive REAL slow,,, :flag_of_truce:

Today, I passed 4 different cars,, they were driving about 20 MPH (my tractor will go faster than that)

Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold?? :dunno:
 

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I just got back from a quick store/post office run,,, IT IS COLD OUTSIDE!!

Most times,, I do not pass people on the road I travel,, but,
it seems when it is this cold (close to single digits!!), other people want to drive REAL slow,,, :flag_of_truce:

Today, I passed 4 different cars,, they were driving about 20 MPH (my tractor will go faster than that)

Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold?? :dunno:
The boost in power may be due to the density of the air. When air is extremely cold it is much more dense(more Oxygen per given volume of air) than when warm, so you get the boost similarly to if you had a pressurized intake like a turbo. As long as the engine computer recognizes that the engine has swallowed a more dense charge of air(more O2), it is probably injecting additional fuel.
You would probably see the same boost with diesel, however you have the extreme cold fighting against you, as a diesel utilizes heat to create ignition rather than spark. You are still gaining the advantage of the dense air, but being more dense and extremely cold, it is also cooling the cylinder better, decreasing it's effect. Also my tractor does not adjust the fuel for the temperature of the air, so there would not be any increase in fuel, so the air to fuel mixture is slightly leaner.

The above is conjecture on my part. I do not know that your truck being a 99 has the ability to adjust fuel based on air charge density. So what I wrote may be just so much BS. Perhaps someone else will chime in and correct my statements.:bigthumb:
 

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Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold?? :dunno:
Probably cause there is ice on the road..... :hide:


:laugh:

I cant say I have ever seen a increase in power when its cold.. I would say the colder air entering the intake would gain some performance, might even be enough to feel.

Also, if you had your truck since 1999, there was no 6.0 engine back then.. :unknown:
 

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I just got back from a quick store/post office run,,, IT IS COLD OUTSIDE!!

Most times,, I do not pass people on the road I travel,, but,
it seems when it is this cold (close to single digits!!), other people want to drive REAL slow,,, :flag_of_truce:

Today, I passed 4 different cars,, they were driving about 20 MPH (my tractor will go faster than that)

Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold?? :dunno:

One of the ways to boost power on a race car is to install an intercooler and make sure the fuel and the air being injected is as cold as possible. That is why you will see us dumping bags of ice in the Intercooler when drag racing.There is a show on one of the channels about Street Racing (which is actually filmed on a closed course) where the guys have large aluminum intercoolers in the trunks of their drag cars which they are dumping bags of crushed ice into. Same exact thing.--- As stated already, the colder the air and fuel, the denser it is when forced into the intake system, whether it is a super charger, or other induction assistance aid.Many Tractor Pullers often do the exact same thing if they are using s Super Charger or Turbo's.

Or perhaps you have a cold weather Nitrous Oxide kit installed on your truck that you are not aware of. But the bottles have to be refilled so after a short while, you would notice.....I am just kidding about the NOS kit on your truck. :laugh:
 

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Adding to what SulleyBear says about gas engines - diesels want cold air. Look at any modern big truck - if it has a turbo it has an aftercooler.

I think the OP experienced the computer on his vehicle adding more fuel for combustion because of the cold air.

And people driving slowly - when I first start out when it is really cold I take it really easy. Even though I warm the engine up that does not warm the trans, transfer case, rear end, etc. I can feel how stiff they are and take it easy for the first 5 miles or so. But I won't get out there and do 25mph on a 55mph road......
 

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The boost in power may be due to the density of the air. When air is extremely cold it is much more dense(more Oxygen per given volume of air) than when warm, so you get the boost similarly to if you had a pressurized intake like a turbo. As long as the engine computer recognizes that the engine has swallowed a more dense charge of air(more O2), it is probably injecting additional fuel.
You would probably see the same boost with diesel, however you have the extreme cold fighting against you, as a diesel utilizes heat to create ignition rather than spark. You are still gaining the advantage of the dense air, but being more dense and extremely cold, it is also cooling the cylinder better, decreasing it's effect. Also my tractor does not adjust the fuel for the temperature of the air, so there would not be any increase in fuel, so the air to fuel mixture is slightly leaner.

The above is conjecture on my part. I do not know that your truck being a 99 has the ability to adjust fuel based on air charge density. So what I wrote may be just so much BS. Perhaps someone else will chime in and correct my statements.:bigthumb:
You are dead on, the dense air increases power. In racing Density Altitude is referred to quite often trying to make comparisons between different areas, temps, etc a little more easily compatible.

My Trailblazer was a consistent 11.9 sec 1/4 mile rig. One fall the track opened for a special track day, it was very cool and the DA was sky high. I had to retune and add gobs of fuel. Went 11.1. Nearly a second faster.
 

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You are dead on, the dense air increases power. In racing Density Altitude is referred to quite often trying to make comparisons between different areas, temps, etc a little more easily compatible.

My Trailblazer was a consistent 11.9 sec 1/4 mile rig. One fall the track opened for a special track day, it was very cool and the DA was sky high. I had to retune and add gobs of fuel. Went 11.1. Nearly a second faster.
I probably should have added that the diesel would see the increase when it is fully warmed, provided it has the ability to add the extra fuel. But the 1025R ain't that sophisticated. Big rigs are a totally different animal and most likely would have the ability to add extra fuel when required. Not sure, but it seems logical. At least up to the point of the limitations of the design parameter of the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Also, if you had your truck since 1999, there was no 6.0 engine back then.. :unknown:
It is a '99,, and it has the 6.0 liter 300 HP, 4.10 axle,,, and a snow plow option package,,, (no snow plow,,, though)



There were only 7 of these in the state of Virginia when we bought it,, it was brand new.

Or perhaps you have a cold weather Nitrous Oxide kit installed on your truck that you are not aware of. But the bottles have to be refilled so after a short while, you would notice.....I am just kidding about the NOS kit on your truck. :laugh:
Do you see a nitrous package in there anywhere?? :dunno:

:lolol:

I would bet there is a street rodder somewhere waiting for my truck to wear out,
so they can get the engine for their build,,,:flag_of_truce:
 

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It is a '99,, and it has the 6.0 liter 300 HP, 4.10 axle,,, and a snow plow option package,,, (no snow plow,,, though) I would bet there is a street rodder somewhere waiting for my truck to wear out,
so they can get the engine for their build,,,:flag_of_truce:
Had the 6.0 in my Hummer H2 and it was a good motor. I added a supercharger Kit and changed the exhaust manifolds to Edelbrock Ceramic coated headers and also used the aftermarket CPU "Modifier". Added a fresh air kit for the cooler air. Put on a Borla Dual exhaust kit and the truck dyno'ed at 468 HP......Improved the drive ability and the fuel mileage went up significantly, when I wasn't driving with my foot to the floor. It went from 10 mpg stock to about 15.5 mpg after the changes.

Now, with the price of crate motors which are ready to go out of the box, many builds of street rods, etc,. don't even bother with motors which have lot's of miles on them. You can buy a ready to go motor which has been run on the dyno and tuned for $4,500 and up. It's not cost effective to pay for the machining and rebuild on motors with lot's of miles like it used to be.

Crate Engines/Motors at Summit Racing

Most of the new crate motors will also come with a warranty on them, even some of the motors used in racing, which is hard to believe, but they do it.

Drag Racing Engines by Engine Builder Steve Schmidt
 

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I was cheated, my tractors wont go over 20mph, closer to 18 :nunu:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was cheated, my tractors wont go over 20mph, closer to 18 :nunu:
My wife followed me home,, she said I was going over 25 MPH,,, down grades @ 29 MPH



We also checked the mileage and time,, they all agreed,,,

How else do you get your new tractor the 35 miles home on a nice summer day?? :dunno:

:laugh:
 

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My wife followed me home,, she said I was going over 25 MPH,,, down grades @ 29 MPH



We also checked the mileage and time,, they all agreed,,,

How else do you get your new tractor the 35 miles home on a nice summer day?? :dunno:

:laugh:
That is a beauty! First one I ever saw. I would have driven it home even at 16 mph! And enjoyed the ride. I am basing my mph on the tach of the 2030 and the digital readout on the 6415. 6415 a 16 speed, they also make a 24 speed.
 

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The above is conjecture on my part. I do not know that your truck being a 99 has the ability to adjust fuel based on air charge density. So what I wrote may be just so much BS. Perhaps someone else will chime in and correct my statements.:bigthumb:
Matter expands when it is heated and contracts when it is cold.

So obviously, you live in such a damn cold part of the country that your world contracts. So you think you're going faster, but it is an illusion caused by your distance between home and the tractor store (or bar) is shorter.

ps. I'm married to a physicist...I'm pretty sure she's reading about the new discovery of gravity waves and not reading this forum. Speaking of gravity waves....maybe that might explain your speed boost.
 

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That is a beauty! First one I ever saw. I would have driven it home even at 16 mph! And enjoyed the ride. I am basing my mph on the tach of the 2030 and the digital readout on the 6415. 6415 a 16 speed, they also make a 24 speed.

If your tractor does not have a speedometer readout, you can get an app to tell you how fast you are going. The app I use is called Speedview. It uses satellite tracking.

Dave
 

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I notice it in my Jetta TDI (Diesel). As mentioned, the air is more dense. It runs through the turbo where it is compressed a bit but that causes it to heat up so then it goes through the intercooler. With the really cold air blowing across the intercooler it cools the air even more. Since the emissions system is monitoring the fuel air ratio it will give it more fuel. Combine that with the winter grade fuel and it means my MPG numbers drop but the smiles go up.

We have the 6.2l in our GMC Yukon and I don't notice any difference in cold or hot. I am sure there is a slight gain but not enough that my butt dyno notices. There is no turbo or intercooler in that though.
 

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I had a '96 Dodge Dakota with the v-6 that I could tell a big difference in. It sounded like an airplane when cold. Now my Ram with the Hemi always has lots of power, don't really notice the difference.
 

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Part of it is denser air, and denser fuel, but the biggest reason the 6.0 has more snot on cold mornings, is the mapping.

It's a quirk, from the computer running the warm up settings. Timing is advanced a bit more, mix is richened up.
Mine does it too. Pay attention and you'll notice that it mellows out after the Temp gauge starts getting close to 140 degrees or so.
It's fun for a couple stop signs though.

Toss a Chip in the truck, and you can get the same effect and more.
 

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Diesels don't run "rich" like a gas engine. If you add fuel, it makes more power. If you see a diesel putting out black smoke, that means it's not running on the excess of air it normally does. You *could* call that "rich", but it's still not quite correct.

Diesels are not air throttled like a gasser. (Most) diesels do not have any restrictions in the intake of the engine unlike a gasser which has a throttle blade of some kind. Diesels use the amount of fuel injected to respond to load settings while a gasoline engine must maintain a stoichiometric or an equal mixture ratio to burn correctly. Fuel ratios must be close to 14.7:1 in a gasoline engine while a diesel enjoys a fuel ratio between about 30:1 at full tilt to about 100:1 at idle.
 
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