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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody know what this is? Found it in my diesel cans. Seems to be a varnish type sludge. I think the filter in the nozzle of the cans has been stopping it from getting to the tractor tank (I hope:nunu:). That filter is where I first noticed it. I do use a diesel additive.
 

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Never seen that in my diesel cans but I have in my gas cans especially after letting the gas sit over the winter etc. The gas which is 10% ethanol is particularly bad about this in our area.
 

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That's really ugly! Your cans are not metal (Galvanized) are they?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is ugly. Same plastic cans I have always used. I'm starting to wonder if it came from the diesel pump that way. Other thought is maybe the small residue of diesel left in the can when empty over the winter turned into that. Also last summer I changed to a different (same major brand) diesel additive so wondering if that had anything to do with it. It is a mystery.
 

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There are types of diesel Algea that can look like that. I doubt they would grow in a 5 gallon container, but they might have come in from the pumps storage tank.

Are they jelly like? They also could have hardened up from the lack of water in your small cans.

Do you use any type of treatment in your tractors?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It is jelly like. Always use additives.
 

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I would bag it in a ziplock and take it back to the place you get fuel and ask them to tell you what it is. If it is algae, you need to treat the tanks you used the fuel in. You do not want that stuff growing in your tractor tank.
 

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I'm voting algae.
 

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:gaah::gaah::gaah:

That is pretty gruesome stuff. Hopefully you caught it in time before any real damage can occure. :good2:
 

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OK, so this diesel algae is new to me. You guys mention always running some additives. What additives do you recommend? For my 2520 I bought a 14 gallon storage tank with pump from Northern Tool so I wouldn't have to make as many trips to the gas station with my 5 Gallon can. Should I be adding something whenever I fill that? Or when I fill the tractor? What should I be adding? Thanks!!!
 

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Haven't used anything with the JD, primarily because I only use additives in winter and I bought it near the tail end of the last one. However, I also have an F-350, a TDI Jetta wagon, and A Smart car. All are diesel. I've used Power Service, but the TDI crowd are ranting about Optilube, so may have to give that a shot...

OK, so this diesel algae is new to me. You guys mention always running some additives. What additives do you recommend? For my 2520 I bought a 14 gallon storage tank with pump from Northern Tool so I wouldn't have to make as many trips to the gas station with my 5 Gallon can. Should I be adding something whenever I fill that? Or when I fill the tractor? What should I be adding? Thanks!!!
 

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Brian is the resident expert on additives for diesel fuel, I am sure he will respond soon.
 

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Sorry for the delay in response. I have been out spraying the fields...

This thread contains more than you will ever want to know about diesel fuel additives. It contains a study that I was involved in and shows what fuel additives add the most lubricosity to the diesel since our new ultra low sulfur diesels lack that.
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?631-Fuel-Filter-change&highlight=soyshield

Opti-lube is great stuff, but it will force the water to the bottom of the tank. Fine if you use your ride often and you change filters but in my opinion not something I would use in my tractor since it sits so much. The water would fall to the bottom of the tank.

In my opinion, you need something that will help to keep the water suspended in the fuel and allow it to be "burned". With that said, our current tractors do not have high pressure injectors and depending how you run them (high pressure injection engines) suspending water could be bad. (but only in extreme situations)

So what does all this have to do with what you have? Well first, the last thing you want is to trap water in the bottom of your tanks since you already have introduced algae to the system. 90% chance says that is you use a good emulsifier, (Emulsifiers break the water into microscopic droplets and prevent the droplets from joining together. The water is suspended in, and carried along with, the fuel. The volume of droplets is not great enough to block lines or damage injectors. FPPF is a typical emulsifier.) things will be OK. I would try to run your fuel tanks close to empty then fill them with clean diesel.

Read that thread I linked. A ton of good stuff in there. Many, many people like Power Service. Its easy to purchase and they put a ton of $$$ in marketing. Those people should just add some Kerosene to their tanks and save money. I used to be good friends with a guy who was high up there. Very nice guy and taught me a lot, including what they sold. Don't waste your money on it.

The only additive I use is FPPF along with some soysheild from Schafers. Soyshield is not easy to find but well worth it. One could run only soyshield if they wanted.

I need to shower off these chemicals. Let me know if I can help any more.
 

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Thanks Brian, lots of good info. in this, and the other thread you link to...

Sorry for the delay in response. I have been out spraying the fields...

This thread contains more than you will ever want to know about diesel fuel additives. It contains a study that I was involved in and shows what fuel additives add the most lubricosity to the diesel since our new ultra low sulfer diesels lack that.
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?631-Fuel-Filter-change&highlight=soyshield

Opti-lube is great stuff, but it will force the water to the bottom of the tank. Fine if you use your ride often and you change filters but in my opinion not something I would use in my tractor since it sits so much. The water would fall to the bottom of the tank.

In my opinion, you need something that will help to keep the water suspended in the fuel and allow it to be "burned". With that said, our current tractors do not have high pressure injectors and pending how you run them (high pressure injection engines) suspending water could be bad. (but only in extreme situations)

So what does all this have to do with what you have? Well first, the last thing you want is to trap water in the bottom of your tanks since you already have introduced algea tot he system. 90% chance says that is you use a good emulsifier, (Emulsifiers break the water into microscopic droplets and prevent the droplets from joining together. The water is suspended in, and carried along with, the fuel. The volume of droplets is not great enough to block lines or damage injectors. FPPF is a typical emulsifier.) things will be ok. I would try to run your fuel tanks close to empty then fill them with clean diesel.

Read that thread I linked. A ton of good stuff in there. Many, many people like powerservice. Its easy to purchase and they put a ton of $$$ in marketing. Those people should just add some Kerosine to their tanks and save money. I used to be good friends with a guy who was high up there. Very nice guy and taught me a lot, including what they sold. Don't waste your money on it.

The only additive I use is FPPF along with some soysheild from schafers. Soyshield is not easy to find but well worth it. One could run only soyshield if they wanted.

I need to shower off these chemicals. Let me know if I can help any more.
 

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Sorry for the delay in response. I have been out spraying the fields...

This thread contains more than you will ever want to know about diesel fuel additives. It contains a study that I was involved in and shows what fuel additives add the most lubricosity to the diesel since our new ultra low sulfur diesels lack that.
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?631-Fuel-Filter-change&highlight=soyshield

Opti-lube is great stuff, but it will force the water to the bottom of the tank. Fine if you use your ride often and you change filters but in my opinion not something I would use in my tractor since it sits so much. The water would fall to the bottom of the tank.

In my opinion, you need something that will help to keep the water suspended in the fuel and allow it to be "burned". With that said, our current tractors do not have high pressure injectors and depending how you run them (high pressure injection engines) suspending water could be bad. (but only in extreme situations)

So what does all this have to do with what you have? Well first, the last thing you want is to trap water in the bottom of your tanks since you already have introduced algae to the system. 90% chance says that is you use a good emulsifier, (Emulsifiers break the water into microscopic droplets and prevent the droplets from joining together. The water is suspended in, and carried along with, the fuel. The volume of droplets is not great enough to block lines or damage injectors. FPPF is a typical emulsifier.) things will be OK. I would try to run your fuel tanks close to empty then fill them with clean diesel.

Read that thread I linked. A ton of good stuff in there. Many, many people like Power Service. Its easy to purchase and they put a ton of $$$ in marketing. Those people should just add some Kerosene to their tanks and save money. I used to be good friends with a guy who was high up there. Very nice guy and taught me a lot, including what they sold. Don't waste your money on it.

The only additive I use is FPPF along with some soysheild from Schafers. Soyshield is not easy to find but well worth it. One could run only soyshield if they wanted.

I need to shower off these chemicals. Let me know if I can help any more.
Excellent info. Thanks!
 

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It is always good to get info like this, especially when one is storing diesel and thinking of storing even more :D
 

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When identifying diesel contamination issues, there are two areas to examine: biological and chemical. The presence of "algae" in diesel fuel is actually a chemical reaction that produces asphaltenes, a diesel sludge that resembles what we know as algae. This sludge might look like algae, but real algae cannot grow in diesel fuel

Read more: How to Test Diesel Fuel for Algae | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7383533_test-diesel-fuel-algae.html#ixzz1SOToeQtI



Again --- This sludge might look like algae, but real algae cannot grow in diesel fuel
 

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When identifying diesel contamination issues, there are two areas to examine: biological and chemical. The presence of "algae" in diesel fuel is actually a chemical reaction that produces asphaltenes, a diesel sludge that resembles what we know as algae. This sludge might look like algae, but real algae cannot grow in diesel fuel

Read more: How to Test Diesel Fuel for Algae | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7383533_test-diesel-fuel-algae.html#ixzz1SOToeQtI



Again --- This sludge might look like algae, but real algae cannot grow in diesel fuel
???:unknown: Micro-organisms can and do grow in diesel fuel. You are only looking at the chemical side normaly called bio-degradation. Micro-organisms, bacteria and enzyme activity, fungus, yeast and mold cause diesel fuel degradation and the formation of waste products.

While the main trouble with these creatures is the waste they create and the solids then created in the fuel. Somewhat like the process of turning milk into cottage cheese.

Here, the unlucky end user filled up his fuel tank and got this debris delivered as a part of his diesel fuel.

There is no doubt that micro-organisms can and do grow in diesel. They may not look like the algea we see in water, but thats how they are classified.
 
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